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brimmer
12-17-2014, 06:06 PM
Just a quick survey of the uke world... How many of you have celtic/irish/scots tunes in your repertoire? Or american fiddle tunes?

I prefer campanella fingerstle, a la my all time uke hero, John King. I've worked thru all the celtic books/ebooks I can find (Rob MacKillop, Wilfried Welti, Ken Middleton, and a few others) but found myself hankering for more (and more challenging) tab arrangements. I've worked out about 40 tabs of tunes, mostly Irish, but now adding in some tunes from Scotland, Brittany, and Cape Breton & Prince Edward Islands.

So I am curious, is there an interest for this kind of music? I would like to offer my tabs but feel I should have a youtube or mp3 demo, and I'm still working on my recording techniques. If there's interest I'll create a website, but don't want to go to the trouble if the interest is lacking...

Also if you are a celtic fan, PM me for some great websites for OOP albums in MP3.

kypfer
12-17-2014, 09:40 PM
brimmer asked:
How many of you have celtic/irish/scots tunes in your repertoire?If by "scots tunes" you include traditional highland bagpipe music, then, yes, several, if not many!

Highland bagpipe music is nominaly written in Amix (not Amin) which has two sharps, the instrument itself having a range of nine notes, a low G then the mixolydian scale A to A. These tunes can be easily transposed down to "one sharp" and played on a D scale with a low C ... on a ukulele from the open C string up to the fifth fret on the A string.

If you're interested, a zip file containing some 1400 bagpipe tunes in ABC format can be found here http://web.archive.org/web/*/http://membres.multimania.fr/corneymusers/dl/ABCTUNES.zip

As for American fiddle tunes, Barry Sholder's clawhammer ukulele book http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Clawhammer-Ukulele-Tablature-Book-Thumpin-on-the-Old-Time-Uke-Barry-Sholder-/230857741246 does it for me :)

fynger
12-18-2014, 12:34 AM
Similar to a celtic tune ( ish ).......anyone have a tab for " The Lampton Worm " ( D'Ampton Worm ) ??

IamNoMan
12-18-2014, 01:28 AM
Ma Cushla Ma Crea, Tis it Celtic Fiddle toons ye wish t' bae Tabbing? Try this site for one: O'Neill's Music Of Ireland
http://www.freesheetmusic.net/oneills8.html
Na pick yer gob off the floor. and get Craich'n.

brimmer: Are you daft? Surely you jest? Does anyone here not like Celtic, Scottish or American Fiddle Tunes? You do know The Tune to the Star Spangled Banner was written by O'Carolan? The Tune Soldiers Joy had a totally different name before Robert Burns penned this little ditty:

When the shrill trumpet sounds on high,
And wide the floating banners fly,
When the fierce foe with dire alarms,
Provoking, menaces to arms:
When glittering swords and cannons play,
And death in triumph guides the fray,
The foe to slaughter and destroy:
This is alone the soldier's joy.
I have communicated with several people on this site, this week, who are preparing Songs for Burns Night: http://www.mildenhall.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123377553

As I type this I'm gazing at a picture of the beautiful Natalie MacMaster, Queen of the Cape Breton Fiddlers. A Tab for " I'sa Boy" would be appreciated by me for one. Oh yeah that reminds me I need to work on "Old Ebenezer Scrooge" this week. Bill Monroe wrote that one.

I think it fair to say at least one person at UU is interested in this kind of music.

Cornfield
12-18-2014, 01:44 AM
Are you using DGAD tuning or other version of DADGAD on the uke? This is a pretty common Celtic guitar tuning.

CeeJay
12-18-2014, 01:44 AM
och ,More of a Rangers fan me-self yer ken..

IamNoMan
12-18-2014, 02:04 AM
Are you using DGAD tuning or other version of DADGAD on the uke? This is a pretty common Celtic guitar tuning.I use Double C tuning on my banjo when I am playing fiddle tunes with a group that doesn't change key every tune. For the uke I find it much easier to use gCEA for fiddle tunes. The big advantage here is when playing D and A tunes your reentrant sounds an A drone anyway and if you are playing up the neck you can use another finger to drone an A on the first string.

kypfer
12-18-2014, 04:13 AM
och ,More of a Rangers fan me-self yer ken..

Nice one CeeJay ... I'll guess it'll go well over the heads of our trans-atlantic cousins :cool:

brimmer
12-18-2014, 04:16 AM
Thanks for the responses! I have a bunch of books I work out of - O'neilll's 1001 and Music of Ireland, the Roche collection (online), Ceol Rince na Eireann, The Atholl collection, and a few excellent books from Cranford Publishing out of Cape Breton Island. The Schott world series has nice fiddle books of scots and welsh tunes with excellent recordings. Even Colin Tribe has two british isles uke books on Schott...nice arrangments of folk songs, but not many fiddle tunes. Plus I sometimes cross check with versions online on the session.org. So much music so little time.

I try to retain the original keys but often transpose down to F or C - which aren't session keys. I can't think of the uke as a session instrument unless amplified. Even mandolins can be hard to hear in a session! Instead, I play them as solo arrangements, as many great trad musicians used to, or with a guitar backing. I tried sticking with original keys but found myself taking too many trips up to fret 14, and I want the tabs to be accessible to ukers with only 12 frets.

Also I didn't think of alternate tunings for the uke, thanks for the tip. I do play this music on guitar, sometimes in DADGAD but usually in standard or dropped D. I am afraid the alternate tuning would bust my brain wokring out new campanella scales. Also, I'll check out the pipe site. I love pipes and have a few pipe tunes completed. I still haven't figured out how to render the scots snap on the uke. Straspeys will have to wait.

I'll try and polish a few arrangements up and get them posted on UU, with or without a demo, within a few weeks! Thanks again for the feedback...

Robin Harrison
12-18-2014, 04:55 AM
Don't forget there are loads of trad English tunes out there too. Good punchy, dancy tunes they are as well.
Here's a page from our Toronto session book. I put all the tunes together......this is one of our favourite sets.
I would like to see you put a web site up with your sheet music/ tabs.
I too like the campanella style ( early days for me though) but my main music thing is trad. English music with concertina/button accordion so I would be fascinated to hear what the ukulele can bring to these traditional folk areas. Go for it....do it and people will come.
74213

Down Up Dick
12-18-2014, 05:19 AM
This'll be no help to anyone at all, but I play Celtic music a lot. However, I play it on my flutes and whistles and not on my Ukes. I really like to play Irish slow Airs and Scottish songs. For faster pieces I use my fifes or piccolos. If there was a group for Ukes, I might sign up, though I'm kinda disappointed with the groups--not much action.

See? No help at all. :old:

brimmer
12-18-2014, 05:20 AM
Thanks! I could work those out and keep them in the original key. I'll let you know if I get a decent result...

I suppose by tuning up a whole step one could play C and F arrangements in their original key. The brighter sound from a higher tuning might cut thru the fiddles a bit more.

fynger
12-18-2014, 05:41 AM
I found this,........ http://chordify.net/chords/tony-wilson-folk-song-from-the-north-east-the-lambton-worm-thebanj

IamNoMan
12-18-2014, 06:12 AM
Brimmer, Please reconsider the notion of transposing to F and C. I really like playing in C and I can transpose C or F on the fly but not at sessiun tempo.. The Old Time crowd will be upset with F and a lot of fiddlers and mandolinists really don't like C for some reason. The uke is very accessible to D,A and G tunes. If we want to get the ukers more involved in the types of music you are endorsing they might as well learn it in the Keys they will encounter in the reel world of sessiuns. You and I know how tetchy some of the Irish and OT crowd can be and how easy it is for enthusiasm to get crushed by snarkiness and overawed by Fleadh Cheoil caliber playing. Nuff said.

Do you have a Tab for "Johnny I hardly knew you"? Heard a woman from a Polish Chanty Group do it once. It was in polish but there wasn't a dry eye in the German club where the after hours Ceilli was held for the Mystic Sea Music Festival.

brimmer
12-18-2014, 06:30 AM
iamnoman, what do you think about tuning up a whole step, whick would put the tune back in the right key. I always try to preserve the original key but only succeed about a third of the time. Later I'll post the bag of potatoes, which I kept in a key with 2 sharps.

IamNoMan
12-18-2014, 06:44 AM
If i'm playing the banjo - no problem
If I'm playing a diatonic accordion no way. A german accordion is just as appropriate here as a uke.
On the uke it is problematic.

If I am wandering around and encounter a sessiun with my uke I probably don't have a capo. This frequently happens with banjo too but I can deal with it. Most of the uke crowd I play with don't even know what a capo is. There is an additional problem. A lot of older ukers have rheumatiz or big hands or other issues. The sudden shift in scale length is not going to make their playing easier or better. Since I play by ear I can probably transpose on the fly, right about by the time somebodies foot goes up. For BlueGrass or Irish fiddle tunes I have enough difficulty keeping up to tempo already.

brimmer
12-18-2014, 08:03 AM
If you tuned the uke ADF#B (once a standard uke tuning) then a tune arranged in F would be in G, and a tune in C would be in D. No need to transpose, no capo needed.

I'll look up Johnny I Hardly Knew you and see if I can tab it.

brimmer
12-18-2014, 10:56 AM
OK, four tunes posted in the tabs section. Sorry, no demos yet. Feedback always appreciated, but please be gentle - this is a hobby, not a career for me!

Gotta to get a hornpipe uploaded to round out the set...

pritch
12-18-2014, 11:30 AM
Nice one CeeJay ... I'll guess it'll go well over the heads of our trans-atlantic cousins :cool:

It works down here though :)

IamNoMan
12-18-2014, 11:36 AM
My friends from BU can't even say the word right. Of course they are Hockey players.

Luke El U
12-18-2014, 03:10 PM
Are you using DGAD tuning or other version of DADGAD on the uke? This is a pretty common Celtic guitar tuning.

Here's a related note I sent to Rob MacKillop and his response:

"Now, Iíve been working on transposing for Gbdg uke some of the Scottish lute music you have transcibed for DADF#AD guitar. A few of them work well IMHO. In your Scottish Guitar book you mention the manuscripts of some 500 Scottish lute works of the 17th century. Is any more of that available to the public? Iíd like to try to find more pieces that might work on uke.

Bill

Rob MacKillop | November 28, 2014 at 7:27 am | Reply
Good for you, Bill.
The arrangements in my Scottish Guitar book are copyrighted by Mel Bay. You should not use them. They are also my arrangements. If you really care about the music, and Iím sure you do, then you should track down copies of the original lute tablatures and transcribe them before arranging them for ukulele. Thatís what I would do. My arrangements are adaptations for the guitar in Open D tuning, necessitating a few changes from the originals. Any new arrangements must come from the original lute tabs. Some of the Scottish lute mss are turning up on Scribd. Good luck!"

itsme
12-18-2014, 04:07 PM
Here's a related note I sent to Rob MacKillop and his response:

"Now, Iíve been working on transposing for Gbdg uke some of the Scottish lute music you have transcibed for DADF#AD guitar. A few of them work well IMHO. In your Scottish Guitar book you mention the manuscripts of some 500 Scottish lute works of the 17th century. Is any more of that available to the public? Iíd like to try to find more pieces that might work on uke.

Bill

Rob MacKillop | November 28, 2014 at 7:27 am | Reply
Good for you, Bill.
The arrangements in my Scottish Guitar book are copyrighted by Mel Bay. You should not use them. They are also my arrangements. If you really care about the music, and Iím sure you do, then you should track down copies of the original lute tablatures and transcribe them before arranging them for ukulele. Thatís what I would do. My arrangements are adaptations for the guitar in Open D tuning, necessitating a few changes from the originals. Any new arrangements must come from the original lute tabs. Some of the Scottish lute mss are turning up on Scribd. Good luck!"
I think maybe Rob misunderstood your original request... I read it that you were inquiring about the availability of manuscripts. He seemed a little defensive of his copyrights.

But whatever, I do admire his work and he did get back to you and offer encouragement. :)

There's a lot of raw material out there for you to work with. I love fingerpicking and campanella, and look forward to seeing your arrangements. :)

Cornfield
12-18-2014, 04:42 PM
You may get a bit of information from this site: http://mudcat.org/

brimmer
12-18-2014, 04:51 PM
Luke, that's also how I read your request - you were looking for a source of manuscripts. In the end, he sent you to Scribd. Don't know why he was so concerned about your trying to play his guitar arrangements on the uke. I guess when you used the term "transposed" he assumed you were prepping them for distribution. Rob is one of my uke heros, my style of arrangements is based on what I learned from his Celtic uke book.

I enjoy Scottish lute music, and if you can track down some old tablature and work them out for uke, I would love to see/play them. I hunted for scottish lute tab but came up empty. But I didn't try Scribd.

brimmer
12-18-2014, 05:01 PM
Luke, Here are some pieces from the Balcarres lute book, in the original tab. Good luck deciphering it, but the image quality is good. They also have pieces from the Skene manuscript.

http://www.cs.dartmouth.edu/~wbc/tab-serv/tab-serv.cgi?Balcarres

Luke El U
12-19-2014, 12:14 AM
Luke, Here are some pieces from the Balcarres lute book, in the original tab. Good luck deciphering it, but the image quality is good. They also have pieces from the Skene manuscript.

http://www.cs.dartmouth.edu/~wbc/tab-serv/tab-serv.cgi?Balcarres

Many thanks for the great link, Brimmer! Do you also have a link for the Skene manuscript?

Here's the first half of my note to MacKillop:

Bill | November 28, 2014 at 2:09 am | Reply
Hello Again Rob,

I’ve transposed 20 other pieces from Briggs and made them available weeks ago to members of Ukulele Underground. They’re only in notes for gCea tuning, no tabs, no CD. Sorry it took me so long to get around to informing your readers here. They can be found at:
https://www.mediafire.com/?s273n5cyv1llgx0

I'm a huge fan of MacKillop also. He's a fantastic musician, and I would never think of ripping him off. There is a book of the Balcarres MS published, but it costs about $150USD. I'm not sure it will all work on the uke, and I'm not intending to make any money from arrangements.

I've paused my work on the Balcarres work and instead refocused on the Sanz baroque guitar material. There are dozens of other pieces that Mackillop didnt arrange for uke. Sanz works very well on the uke. Have you seen my post on the easy steps to arrange his music for the uke?

Cornfield
12-19-2014, 02:00 AM
Here is another link with good fiddle tunes and more http://slippery-hill.com/

brimmer
12-19-2014, 03:51 AM
Luke,

http://www.cs.dartmouth.edu/~wbc/tab-serv/tab-serv.cgi?Skene

That's the link to Skene. If you hunt around on that site you will find an explanation of how to read the tab. Good luck, I look forward to the result!

Yes, I saw that Sanz thread, but didn't realize it was you. I would love to have more Sanz to play. Rob's book is just enough to make me want more...

Bill, thanks for the tip on tinwhistles. I have the Clarke book and also one by Geraldine Cotter, and I have used them for reference. Another good source of tunes.

IamNoMan
12-19-2014, 04:23 AM
You may get a bit of information from this site: http://mudcat.org/Mudcat is a wonderful site. The Digital Tradition is my number two goto for finding song lyrics. My number one goto for song lyrics is the wife of one of the two guys that started Digitrad: "knows more songs than Cooney", Judy Cook. The Mudcat forum is, craich aside, loaded with good scholarship and knowledgeable people. If you are planning a road trip to UK to to a "Pub Crawl" tour of the FolkClubs there. this is a good resource. For song finding and general folklore concerns this is the best one stop site on the Web.

Here is another link with good fiddle tunes and more http://slippery-hill.com/John what a marvelous site.I can see I'll be able to fill a lot of gaps in my fiddle tunes repertoire from this.

Edit: I wish there was a good way to index fiddle tunes the way poems or songs are by the first line. There are so many names for the same fiddle tunes.

Down Up Dick
12-19-2014, 04:42 AM
I read all the scholarly confab about the different keys one could use for Celtic ukulele music, but almost all of my Celtic music is in G or D and sometimes A. Once in a while it's in Bb. Why can't ukuleles just play in those keys? Why are you changing it to C or (the much hated) F?

Where are my darned keys? :old:

kypfer
12-19-2014, 05:11 AM
... but almost all of my Celtic music is in G or D and sometimes A. Once in a while it's in Bb. Why can't ukuleles just play in those keys? Why are you changing it to C or (the much hated) F? It's usually all down to the overall musical range of the tune. The normal 12-fret re-entrant ukulele has a range of an octave and 5 notes, much the same as the easily available range on a recorder (yes, I know you can squeeze out a few more notes on a good instrument if you're good at playing it). If the tune has a couple of low "lead-in" notes, or drops "below the octave" in the middle of the tune, it becomes necessary to choose a higher key (than C or D) to squeeze them all in. The same is true of a tune originally in F or G that extends up into the second octave, on the ukulele you simply run out of notes, hence the need to transpose the tune to fit the ukulele.

Having said all that, there are a lot of good tunes that will fit perfectly well on the ukulele as usually played, so celebrate the little instrument for what it can do, and if you need a few more frets ... there's always a concert or tenor ... or even re-string a soprano in "fifths", like a mandolin or fiddle ... a solution I favour, it still sounds like a ukulele :)

Down Up Dick
12-19-2014, 05:40 AM
However, I understood the thread was about playing Celtic music with a Celtic group. If the group is playing in G or D how can one be playing in C or F on his little ol' Uke?

As far as running out of notes is concerned, one can always double the highest note or drop down to a lower note that will "fit" with the other players. I don't think one would be playing a soprano Uke with an Irish band anyway.

I once saw a flute book for high school band members with Bach's "Minuet in G Major" written in the key of F major so the flutes could play with the brass--heresy! If the instrument can't play the music properly, maybe the player should pick different music. Or maybe he could get the band to retune to his key--Ha!

Ya gotta fit in! :old:

brimmer
12-19-2014, 05:53 AM
What Kypfer said is exactly the issue I run into. If I stick with the original key, I run out of notes below the low C, or the melody takes me up to the 14th fret and beyond. When the melody goes over high A, sometimes I transpose it down a whole step, from D to C, or from G to F. That way I can play the tune on my old Martin. My definite preference is to keep the original key, but I only have 12 frets on most of my ukes, so I prefer to stay within that range. All this discussion about tuning, I have to say traditional players do what they want with these tunes - they change keys, ornamentation, whatever to suit their fancy. That's the folk process I guess. Where traditional music is concerned there are conventions, but no rules. From the comments I'm getting here, I've learned that retaining the original key is mainly important for session playing, because everyone knows the tune in the conventional key.

Also CeeJay's suggestion would work. If you tune in ADF#B, a tune transposed to F from G, or to C from D, would be back in the original key.

That said, here's another tune I just tabbed, and I didn't have to change the key. Fits on the uke fretboard like it was meant to be there. Enjoy!

https://www.dropbox.com/s/3dgxt5hoa9kceh5/Island%20Boy.pdf?dl=0

Cornfield
12-19-2014, 07:30 AM
Sometimes when I'm in a folk jam, if I can't get the key, I'll actually stop and listen to the others occasionally.

Tootler
12-19-2014, 07:50 AM
I play in a folk band and we play both for dancing and for concerts.

Traditional dance music of the British Isles is largely played in D and G these days (well quite a lot of it is modal but is still based on scales with one or two sharps in it). Scotland is something of an exception as it is more likely to be D and A.

The tunes tend to be within the range of D at the bottom of the stave to B above the stave, a range of an octave and a sixth. If you are playing melody, it is possible to cover this range on a 12 fret ukulele tuned ADF#B but not on one tuned GCEA as you will need 14 frets so you can play melody on a soprano tuned ADF#B, for GCEA you need a concert or tenor. A few tunes, more often slow airs, go below D and sometimes down to G - the bottom of the fiddle's range (these are largely fiddle tunes, after all). To play those you will need a low G fourth string. It is possible to move up or down an octave for short sections. That's usually OK in fast tunes but can spoil slow tunes.

If you want to play a chordal accompaniment to the melody playing of other instruments, while ADF#B may seem superficially attractive I find GCEA is actually easier. The chords you will mostly need for D & G are D, G, C, A, Am, Em & Bm. You may occasionally need others but they are rare. All of these, apart from Bm I find straightforward and I find I can usually get away with Bm7 (2222) in a fast dance tune. I find a simple strummed accompaniment works pretty well. In fact when I was out with the band on Wednesday, our fiddler made a comment to that effect. If you get tunes in A then you will need to add E and F#m and, of course, we all know about the E chord :) (I usually play it 444x for fast dance tunes)

Down Up Dick
12-19-2014, 08:08 AM
Sometimes when I'm in a folk jam, if I can't get the key, I'll actually stop and listen to the others occasionally.

Right! That's what I would do, though I don't play with groups. Music for Euphoniums (supposedly low bass instruments) frequently soars into atmospheric heights. When it did, I with my old withered embouchure, just couldn't hack it. So I didn't play that tune. I eventually traded the Euphonium for a baritone (horn) which I can handle. Flutes can't play below B, so, if the band does, one has to adjust somehow or stop playing.

Of course, if one is a bedroom soloist, he can play in any darned key that pleases him/her. :old:

IamNoMan
12-19-2014, 08:17 AM
What Kypfer said is exactly the issue I run into. If I stick with the original key, I run out of notes below the low C, or the melody takes me up to the 14th fret and beyond. When the melody goes over high A, sometimes I transpose it down a whole step, from D to C, or from G to F...traditional players do what they want with these tunes - they change keys, ornamentation, whatever to suit their fancy... the original key is mainly important for session playing, because everyone knows the tune in the conventional key. This is all on the nut as far as it goes. I run into the problem of running out of notes on the low end frequently. What I do in these cases is jump up an octave. If I can I'll do a quick run up the scale or something to keep continuity else I just jump.

Brimmer a question what does a whistle player or piper do when they run out of notes on the low end? They don't stop and listen too often as John Sargent sagely pointed out.

I'm a traditional musician and I play ukulele.* What i do is improvise or better yet change the arrangement to suite the ukulele.


I want to observe something here. It may not be valid but it is my experience in playing Irish music with traditional Irish music players. They DO object to not doing it the traditional way. Actually it is much worse in traditional Irish storytelling circles that observe Gaeltecht conventions. As a Shannachy myself I respect the tradition but I will knock the block off of any Irishman, (or anybody else), who trys to tell me how to tell my stories.



*I guess that makes me a traditional ukulele player. Where's my grass skirt? I have one some where.

Uke Republic
12-19-2014, 08:19 AM
74230

Aye!!!!!

IamNoMan
12-19-2014, 08:21 AM
Tootler: Amen, Amen, Amen, Can you say Hallelujah!

brimmer
12-19-2014, 10:43 AM
OK, I get the point from Iamnoman and Down Up Dick that changing the keys of these tunes violates the tradition and/or is a bad choice because it excludes uke players from sessions. I'm getting input advising to either redo the tunes in their original keys, by substituting high notes for low ones beyond the range, and/or including high notes right up to the soundhole. The main thing is not to change a tune from the "original key" of one sharp or two sharps, because those are the keys the session players use, and because those are the keys the tunes are meant to be in. Nor does it matter how much more difficult the tune will be to play, when you have to negotiate triplets and fast eighths between the 12th and 15th frets.

Here is my position: I tabbed these for my own use, to play solo, not to take to sessions. I'm sharing them with others that might have a desire to play solo arrangements of celtic tunes. If you regularly play sessions with your uke, and you're looking for session arrangements of these tunes, look elsewhere. As a solo player, I don't give a rip what key the tune is in, as long as the melody is right and its fun to play. If trad music purists object to my arrangements, so be it. If the celtic undergods beneath the sod roil in their outrage because I tinkered with the mystic harmonies of the universe, let them roil.

I must admit, the feedback I'm getting for changing keys in my arrangements is starting to rankle. I'm sharing these tabs with those who want them. I'm not charging a nickel for them, and never will. If they suit you, play them for your enjoyment. If not, play something else you enjoy.

twentytabby
12-19-2014, 10:55 AM
Brimmer, what you're doing would work fine for me. If I play any celtic uke with anyone it would most likley be with other uke players, so easiest key for uke would work.
When I play in sessions, I usually play accordion or occasionally a D whistle. Both are loud enough that I can here myself during a session.
When playing american fiddle tunes I either play accordion or banjo, for the same reason as above. I did bring a uke to one jam and just chorded along as loud as I could and still couldn't hear myself.

I am working out quite a few old time american fiddle tunes on my own on the uke, usually in the key of C, some in G and some in Dm. If I was to play them at a jam, I'd probably use a kapo.

I understand folks desire to have the tabs in traditional keys for tunes. I'm just saying what works for me.

itsme
12-19-2014, 11:09 AM
As a solo player, I don't give a rip what key the tune is in, as long as the melody is right and its fun to play.
I'm totally with you there. The uke, especially in re-entrant tuning, has a very limited range. Trying to shoehorn something into a key that doesn't fit well within its range, just seems awkward and unnecessary.

Tootler
12-19-2014, 11:43 AM
Tootler: Amen, Amen, Amen, Can you say Hallelujah!


Hallelujah! :music:

kypfer
12-19-2014, 12:08 PM
brimmer wrote:
Here is my position: I tabbed these for my own use, to play solo, not to take to sessions. I'm sharing them with others that might have a desire to play solo arrangements of celtic tunes. If you regularly play sessions with your uke, and you're looking for session arrangements of these tunes, look elsewhere. As a solo player, I don't give a rip what key the tune is in, as long as the melody is right and its fun to play. If trad music purists object to my arrangements, so be it. If the celtic undergods beneath the sod roil in their outrage because I tinkered with the mystic harmonies of the universe, let them roil.
Once again, thank you for your efforts. I'm in the "fortunate?" position of being able to play tunes I like on a variety of instruments. Should the need arise I've got a mandolin, a banjo and a variety of guitars that I can play "in the proper key", but I often choose to play a ukulele because I like the ukulele :) Being offered arrangements of tunes I know (and even better, tunes I don't know) that fit and work on the ukulele means I can get on and play without having to transpose first :)

Please don't be put off by those who appear not to appreciate your efforts. I feel you can be assured there's a silent majority who do fully appreciate your work !

cdkrugjr
12-19-2014, 12:10 PM
Well heck, I'd just tune to a convenient key. Stevie Ray tuned his guitar starting with Eb rather than E, much to the confusion of guitarists everywhere.

If it's good enough for SRV (and VH, occasionally), it's good enough for me.

Tootler
12-19-2014, 12:19 PM
Here is my position: I tabbed these for my own use, to play solo, not to take to sessions. I'm sharing them with others that might have a desire to play solo arrangements of celtic tunes...

As a solo player, I don't give a rip what key the tune is in, as long as the melody is right and its fun to play...


Quite right.

If you are arranging for your own pleasure or to play with a like minded friends, play in what key you like. One fiddler said as much to me once when I was talking about playing a tune in C on my bass recorder as it made it doable as I could play the top note in C but not in the usual key of D.

Apparently, the G & D convention is relatively recent and there is still a tradition of playing in C in East Anglia. Many 19th century Northumbrian Fiddle tunes were originally written in Bb. in fact Bb seems to have been quite a popular fiddle key at one time.

brimmer
12-19-2014, 12:23 PM
Thanks for the helpful feedback, kypfer & tootler. I also play celtic tunes on the guitar and whistle right out of the book, but I like the challenge of doing campanella arrangements for uke. I would like to get a mandolin, but my wife put her foot down pretty hard on that possibility.

ALSO - I added MIDIs to the five tabs I posted yesterday.

IamNoMan
12-19-2014, 02:29 PM
Hey Brimmer, your explorations and efforts the last couple of days Have opened a lot of eyes and ears up to the ukulele possibilities of Anglo-Celtic Fiddle tunes. Let that be a salve upon your frayed nerves.

I have been puzzled by the concentration on D and G tunes to the exclusion of A. Lot of A tunes in the Scots tradition. I offer an idea for those of us who have difficulty keeping up to speed with the triplets and grace notes. The reentrant G and A are but a full tone apart. Use of Split Stroke or other techniques should allow triplets to be played more easily alternating between these two strings.

vonbiber
12-20-2014, 09:39 AM
Right now I just play 2 Irish tunes:
Garryowen and Larry O'Gaff (just the 1st part now)
and I plan on learning more

IamNoMan
12-20-2014, 06:01 PM
Regarding "Gary Owen" do you sing this or just play the tune. I ask because I do "Gary Owen" in a Storytelling piece I do/am developing on the Irish Brigade. The tune I use at various points in the piece sometimes a couple bars sometimes more. There are a couple sets of lyrics around. with various different verses illustrative of different aspects of soldiering life. Not all verses are suitable for general performance. I am always looking for more. The same goes for "Green grow the Laurel/lilacs/etc" I wish to do a mash-up of "Johnny hardly knew you/Johnny comes marching home" "JIHKY" is done acapella and gets the audience joining in quickly. I do JCMH first and last verse with an ironic twist. I need a simplified or dumbed down version of the tune to JCMH to maximize the impact. Help or ideas welcomed.

vonbiber
12-21-2014, 02:22 AM
Regarding "Gary Owen" do you sing this or just play the tune.

I just play the tune. I didn't even know it was a song as well.

IamNoMan
12-21-2014, 04:52 AM
Gary Owen means born of the yew tree. It is a park located in the east end of Limericktown.

The lyrics are given in "Show More"

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IKI4GQ4c9g0

It is a quickstep march. and used to plan and move armies and soldiers in unison and quickly. There is something to be learned musically from this. Every regiment has its own March. On the march the band plays to keep the soldiers in sync. A march is typically conducted at 120 beat/minute. YMMV: Scottish regiments march to bagpipes at 112 bpm. The French foreign Legion was formed when March time was 70 bmp. They still march at this rate. The march tune of the FFL came later when most armies marched at 120. bmp. When the legionaires sing their march they stand at attention because a 120 bpm song can't be sung while marching at 70 bpm. English light and rifle regiments quick step march at 140 bpm. Presumably Gary Owen should be played at 140 bpm

Double time (180 bpm), cut time (120 bpm but the pace is cut from 30" to 15") - 1/4 notes are treated as 1/8 notes. etc.

Roman soldiers were called Milos. 1000 paces is a mile. From this we can deduce the romans pace was 5.28 feet.

Edit: I checked GO is sung at 120 bpm cuttime in the video, (the rhythm is a little ragged). When the band starts the tempo picks up somewhat but my metronome app is set up for italian conventions not Anglo-Celtic military convention so I couldn't verify 140 bmp.

Down Up Dick
12-21-2014, 05:09 AM
Gary Owen is a ball to play on a piccolo or fife. I play it all time. My piccolos are always fun to play, except on damp winter days. They're wood, and they waterlog. I suppose one of these days they're gonna crack.

I love all kinds of band music. I've been thinking of going back to college and majoring in music so I can play in the band.

:old:

IamNoMan
12-21-2014, 05:10 AM
What tempo do you play it at on fife dick?

Down Up Dick
12-21-2014, 05:36 AM
I don't know; I never measured it. I just play it at whatever speed I feel like playing. I suppose I'd play it in 120 if I got out the ol' metronome.

Hut, two, three . . .:old:

vonbiber
12-21-2014, 07:57 AM
Gary Owen means born of the yew tree. It is a park located in the east end of Limericktown.
The lyrics are given in "Show More"

Thanks for the info.
I can see you did your homework.
I knew that it was Custer's favorite tune. I always play it thinking of Sitting Bull kicking Custer's ass at Little Big Horn.

There's a great version (instrumental) on the guitar by Martin Simpson.

Laouik
12-21-2014, 08:14 AM
I'm Breton... and have a couple of pieces. "Keltische Musik mit der Ukulele" has a lot of super easy, fun little Celtic pieces that are in the lute direction. Videos here - http://www.ukulele-arts.com/keltische-musik-mit-der-ukulele/?lang=en

IamNoMan
12-21-2014, 08:27 AM
This isna getting me back to ma uke but craich is craich: Gary Owen is the regimental march of many regiments, see Wiki, Most notably the 7th US Cavalry and the Fighting Irish of the 69th NY - oldest militia regiment in the states. Many cavalry associations.

When Susan and I arrived in Ireland we rented a car, drove to Limerick and decided to take a nap. Jet lag, beautiful soft Sunday morning. Parked by a Stone bridge at the north end of town. (Gary Owen is a park east end of Limerick). Shortly thereafter a herd of wild horse came thundering through town and over the bridge! Tinkers' horses probably.

Notre Dame's sports teams are of course known as the Fighting Irish as is the 69th New York. Father Corby was the 3rd president of ND. and the chaplain of the 69th during the Civil War. During the battle of Malvern Hill the Louisiana Tigers and the 69th had a Donnybrook over a battery of Cannon. (LA Tigers were maybe 40% irish dock workers. Stonewall called them "Most wicked Fellows"). Both were crack fighters of fearsome reputation. The 69th (re)captured the battery. When RE Lee heard of this fight he is said to have observed: "Now we know just who are the Fighting Irish".

Down Up Dick
12-21-2014, 08:42 AM
I wish the Football Team had fought harder this year. The game against USC was a heart breaker. :old:

IamNoMan
12-21-2014, 12:31 PM
Thanks for the link bill. does anyone know what system the tune description Legend comes from. Some of the letter designations for the tune information is unclear to me.

brimmer
12-21-2014, 03:17 PM
Glad to see so much activity in this thread. Anything we can do to keep these tunes alive, I'm all for it. I'm up to 50 tunes tabbed, working now on some scots tunes from the Athole books. The reels are pretty straightforward, but the strathspeys are another matter. Still working out if there is a way to render those rhythms on the uke. Campanella is good for jigs and reels, but when the rhythms get more jagged, it gets tricky.

I'll make everything available early next year, maybe I'll just zip all of them and post them here.

Anyone know a way to import ABC format into Guitar Pro?

brimmer
12-21-2014, 05:01 PM
Thanks, Bill. I'll see what works with GP and ABC. Would save me a lot of time. Manual entry is tedious, especially when the rhythms are complex.

Also, to Laouik, I have that celtic ebook too, by Wilfried Welti, and like it very much. The O'Carolan arrangements are nicely harmonized.

twentytabby
12-21-2014, 06:44 PM
Speaking of ABC format, one of my favorite sites of all time for a very many celtic and other tunes is:
http://trillian.mit.edu/~jc/cgi/abc/tunefind
You type in part of a name and if it has indexed it, it finds it. This site scours the web and links to any tune it finds in ABC format. It's even picked up some ABC I've done off of my own websites. This site can then display the ABC in standard notation in gif, pdf, etc. and also play it as a midi. The number of tunes it has indexed is absolutely huge.

When I write or modify a tune using ABC, my intent is aways to create a nice readable pdf in standard notation. My favorite site for that is:
http://www.mandolintab.net/abcconverter.php
You can just drop your ABC on this site and get a nice pdf file or midi file. The above site is great for transposing a tune written in ABC. I use it all the time for that.

ABC was developed back in the days of acoustic coupled modems* so the files could be sent without using a lot of bandwidth. I thought it would die with the incredible increase in bandwidth these days, but there's still so much music out there in this format.

*Yes, I am that old.

vonbiber
12-21-2014, 07:33 PM
Anyone know a way to import ABC format into Guitar Pro?

I don't know about Guitar Pro. But there is another typesetting system called lilypond that has a tool
(abc2ly) that converts an abc file into a lilypond file, which could be manually edited to add a tablature staff
to the standard music staves...
http://lilypond.org/

IamNoMan
12-21-2014, 07:56 PM
Thanks for the Heads up on the ABC Format. Little confusing about the ABC format regarding lower case for octaves and the reentrant G 4th string. You cited [C] as gCEc Is this xxx3 or 12 xx3 or in other words how do you notate the fourth string above the 12th fret. DO you understand my confusion?

Tabby: your only as old as the ukulele you play. Or do you only play vintage ukes. ;)

kypfer
12-21-2014, 09:29 PM
Further to the "ABC to TAB" queries in this thread, Tabledit http://www.tabledit.com/ will import ABC and produce tabs for the ukulele, as well as other instruments. I've not used it extensively. You'll still need to edit the output to account for the re-entrant tuning where appropriate, but it does do the job. The program is not free, but there is a "try-before-you-buy" option to be able to check it out.

Hope this helps someone, I'm a great fan of ABC and use it a lot to produce printed notation. Just remember, ABC is effectively a programming language, not an "alternative" music notation. You're not being expected to learn it to play directly from an ABC script, though I've heard of whistle players who can do this!