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WKerrigan
01-03-2015, 11:10 AM
When looking for uke chords for a particular song on the internet, I often find chords like E/G#. What does that mean? That I can play either chord? That I need to switch quickly from one to the other? Or are these some kind of hybrid chords? Thanks for any help you can provide.

Kanaka916
01-03-2015, 12:04 PM
http://liveukulele.com/chords/ukulele-slash-chords/ . . . you can also search UU using this parameter [site:forum.ukuleleunderground.com] and adding a topic or subject after the dot com.

OregonJim
01-03-2015, 01:05 PM
It simply means that you play the first chord in such a way that the second note is the bass (lowest) note of the chord. If the second note isn't in the chord to begin with, then you still voice the chord in a way that makes the second note (the one after the slash) the lowest note.

In your example of E/G#, it means to play an E chord (E-G#-B) in a way that makes the G# the lowest sounding note of the three.

CeeJay
01-03-2015, 01:46 PM
What to "slash" chords mean?

To the OP. Sorry.

Do....... what "Do" etc.....sorry, sorry, sorry, really sorry ........pedant alert.....had to offload my OCD .....Do ...Thank You for your indulgence in this matter.:bowdown:

OregonJim
01-03-2015, 02:06 PM
What to "slash" chords mean?

To the OP. Sorry.

Do....... what "Do" etc.....sorry, sorry, sorry, really sorry ........pedant alert.....had to offload my OCD .....Do ...Thank You for your indulgence in this matter.:bowdown:

Speaking of OCD, your use of ellipses... seven dots, then five, then eight, then five, then five again, then three... :D

CeeJay
01-03-2015, 02:12 PM
Speaking of OCD, your use of ellipses... seven dots, then five, then eight, then five, then five again, then three... :D

Dramatic pauses and emphases.... I am some thing of a drama ................Queen............................. .........dontcha know...?
(just a "Drama" Queen...'kay ??)lol




PS

Hang on ..? You noticed them !!!!! ;)

OregonJim
01-03-2015, 02:19 PM
Dramatic pauses and emphases.... I am some thing of a drama ................Queen............................. .........dontcha know...?
(just a "Drama" Queen...'kay ??)lol

...'kay. A thread about slash chords never amused me before now. :D

Jim Yates
01-03-2015, 02:30 PM
CeeJay, I was taught to always use three dots and it seems that Wikipedia agrees with my teachers. I must admit, that although I do always use three dots, I don't separate them by a space. Probably that rule was made after the advent of computers. My schoolwork was all hand written.

The most common form of an ellipsis is a row of three periods or full stops . . . or a precomposed triple-dot glyph . . . Wikipedia
If an ellipsis ends the sentence, then there are three dots, each separated by a space, followed by the final punctuation. Wikipedia
************************************************** ************************************************** ************************************************** ******************
Back to the topic of the thread:

The slash chords often indicate a moving bass line. An example is the opening chords of Mr. Bojangles. If you play in C, It might be written C / /, CMa7 / /, C6 / /, C / /, but if we wanted to show the bass line, we would probably write it C / /, C/B / /, C/A / /, C/G / /.

If another instrument is playing, it's often best to leave the bass line to them. Slash chords are difficult to use on ukuleles with re-entrant tuning, since there is really no bass. You could indicate the moving line on the first and second strings: C-0003 CMa7-0002 C6-0000 C-0033
I'd be tempted to either play the chord before the slash or else include the note after the slash somewhere in the chord, but not worry about it being the bass note.

OregonJim
01-03-2015, 05:17 PM
If another instrument is playing, it's often best to leave the bass line to them. Slash chords are difficult to use on ukuleles with re-entrant tuning, since there is really no bass. You could indicate the moving line on the first and second strings: C-0003 CMa7-0002 C6-0000 C-0033
I'd be tempted to either play the chord before the slash or else include the note after the slash somewhere in the chord, but not worry about it being the bass note.

I think that is a very good compromise, especially on a limited-range instrument like a uke. In fact, it's good advice for any instrument that is accompanied by a bass, most of the time.

Louis0815
01-04-2015, 11:12 PM
Actually the ukulele almost never cares about bass notes, not even about the root note being the lowest in a chord - it eventually happens, that's all. We are limited by four strings and re-entrant tuning, even linear tuning doesn't really help that much.

Well, with low g (linear tuning) you could at least play a "proper" E/G# as 1402 or 1442...
And Mr. Bojangles could be something like 5433 (C), 4433 (C/B), 2003 or 2433 or 2430 (C/A), 0003 (C/G)...