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View Full Version : It is wrong to mix Fremont Blackline low G with Aquila strings?



tenniscoach
01-04-2015, 04:03 PM
Hi,
It is bad technique to mix the Fremont Blackline low G with Aquila strings (CEA)? I'm trying to cut corners by not replacing the other three strings, but maybe I'm also mixing an apple and three oranges. Thus, creating a bad mix of sounds b/c the strings are different brands?
Please tell me what you pros recommend.

Thank you,
Gary

Andy Chen
01-04-2015, 04:09 PM
I don't know about the combination you mentioned, but I have and matched South Coast with D'Addario Pro Arte, Orcas low G with D'Addario T2, etc.

As long as it sounds fine to you, go for it.

tenniscoach
01-04-2015, 04:23 PM
Thanks, now my new low G string is stretching out…
I keep having to re-tune that string, did I not stretch it out correctly?
How do you stretch it out?

Thanks

OregonJim
01-04-2015, 04:39 PM
I keep having to re-tune that string, did I not stretch it out correctly?
How do you stretch it out?

It'll take a few days of playing to stabilize.

Andy Chen
01-04-2015, 04:40 PM
Some recommend twisting the string between your index finger and thumb somewhere in the middle of the strings. Others (like Ken Middleton of Living Waters strings) warn against it.

I used to twist. Now what I do is, I tune it sharp by half a step and repeat for a few days.

Doc_J
01-04-2015, 05:27 PM
Hi,
It is bad technique to mix the Fremont Blackline low G with Aquila strings (CEA)? I'm trying to cut corners by not replacing the other three strings, but maybe I'm also mixing an apple and three oranges. Thus, creating a bad mix of sounds b/c the strings are different brands?
Please tell me what you pros recommend.

Thank you,
Gary

If it sounds fine to you, that's all that matters. I have had good luck mixing strings from multiple makers.

I might have used a Fremont Soloist low G, or possibly an Aquila low G.

Jon Moody
01-05-2015, 03:13 AM
Some recommend twisting the string between your index finger and thumb somewhere in the middle of the strings. Others (like Ken Middleton of Living Waters strings) warn against it.

Intentionally twisting the string (mainly on a wound one) is running the risk of damaging it, since you can force the wraps to come undone from the silk/nylon core prematurely.



I used to twist. Now what I do is, I tune it sharp by half a step and repeat for a few days.

That's a more recommended method. Or, tune the string to pitch, fret the 12th fret and gently pull on the string. Re-tune, and repeat.


And to the OP, there is NOTHING wrong with swapping different strings/makers on the same uke; classical musicians have been doing this for decades, if not longer. The end result should be a uniform sound on your uke, so however you need to achieve that is the way to go.

NewKid
01-05-2015, 03:24 AM
If loving Fremont Soloist Low G strings is wrong then I don't wanna be right.

SteveZ
01-05-2015, 03:59 AM
One of these days I'm going to take some of my leftover strings and string up a uke (probably my Flea) with one black, one red, one white and one clear. Why not?

Tootler
01-05-2015, 05:28 AM
Some recommend twisting the string between your index finger and thumb somewhere in the middle of the strings. Others (like Ken Middleton of Living Waters strings) warn against it.

I used to twist. Now what I do is, I tune it sharp by half a step and repeat for a few days.

Definitely tune it sharp when you leave it. That way it stretches evenly. Depending on the instrument you should be able to go more than a half step. I usually go a whole step.

wayfarer75
01-05-2015, 06:03 AM
If loving Fremont Soloist Low G strings is wrong then I don't wanna be right.��

Hear hear!