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View Full Version : New Deering ukebanjo!



hendulele
01-14-2015, 02:16 AM
From Facebook: Deering will sell a banjo uke including "technology" from Jens Kruger, the Swiss-born banjo ace from the Kruger Brothers!

https://www.facebook.com/Kruger.Brothers/photos/a.526023277483344.1073741827.333213796764294/765616603524009/?type=1&fref=nf&pnref=story

I confess, I'm a bit biased: The Krugers are fantastic players and terrific guys and they've lived for years in Wilkes County, in the foothills of Western North Carolina where I was born. Even so, when this hits the market, it could be a keeper.
:D

RichM
01-14-2015, 02:19 AM
Intriguing! During my banjo days, Deering quickly became my favorite, and the only banjo I still own is a Deering Maple Blossom. I'd definitely give one of these a try.

SteveZ
01-14-2015, 03:14 AM
Wow! I've got a Deering Goodtime 17-Fret tenor banjo and it's a favorite. This new entry into the Deering line could be a big winner.

PhilUSAFRet
01-14-2015, 03:32 AM
Deering Goodtime banjos an amazing value for the money. I guess I'll be selling the two banjo ukes I have and getting a Deering. Hope they sell a matching case for it. On a similar vein, Goldtone will install a concert or tenor banjo uke neck on their 11" rim.

fynger
01-14-2015, 03:37 AM
looks real nice

spookelele
01-14-2015, 03:54 AM
Not meant to be a criticism at all... but I don't understand banjolele's.
Maybe someone can help me understand.
If you wanted to make a banjo sound... why not just get a banjo?

Part of the reason I picked a dark wood uke's, avoid spruce/cedar tops, and wound strings, is that if I wanted a small guitar, I'd just play a guitar, and capo the 5th.

Shouldn't a uke sound like a uke?

It's not going to out-banjo a banjo, or out-guitar a guitar.
It seems to me a uke should sound like a uke.

I want to stress Im not trying to start an arguement. I'm just trying to understand. Also, I came to uke from guitar, because a uke doesnt sound like a guitar.

hendulele
01-14-2015, 04:12 AM
Check out George Formby or even George Harrison. Originally they became popular because they projected better than unamplified ukes. Now, some people just enjoy playing them.

RichM
01-14-2015, 05:06 AM
Not meant to be a criticism at all... but I don't understand banjolele's.
Maybe someone can help me understand.
If you wanted to make a banjo sound... why not just get a banjo?

Part of the reason I picked a dark wood uke's, avoid spruce/cedar tops, and wound strings, is that if I wanted a small guitar, I'd just play a guitar, and capo the 5th.

Shouldn't a uke sound like a uke?

It's not going to out-banjo a banjo, or out-guitar a guitar.
It seems to me a uke should sound like a uke.

I want to stress Im not trying to start an arguement. I'm just trying to understand. Also, I came to uke from guitar, because a uke doesnt sound like a guitar.

It's just a different approach to making music. To me, a banjo uke has a unique sound and feel. In many ways, the banjo uke speaks to me of an earlier time; they appear a lot in the pop music of the 1920s and 1930s because they were cheap, portable, and LOUD at a time when amplification was unreliable or unavailable. I've also become a huge fan of George Formby, and the banjo uke is so associated with his sound.

If it doesn't speak to you, no worries; lots of other instruments to play! That's the beauty of music-- there are many ways to get there.

river_driver
01-14-2015, 05:33 AM
If it doesn't speak to you, no worries; lots of other instruments to play! That's the beauty of music-- there are many ways to get there.

Eloquently stated, Rich!

SteveZ
01-14-2015, 05:38 AM
Not meant to be a criticism at all... but I don't understand banjolele's.
Maybe someone can help me understand.
If you wanted to make a banjo sound... why not just get a banjo?

Part of the reason I picked a dark wood uke's, avoid spruce/cedar tops, and wound strings, is that if I wanted a small guitar, I'd just play a guitar, and capo the 5th.

Shouldn't a uke sound like a uke?

It's not going to out-banjo a banjo, or out-guitar a guitar.
It seems to me a uke should sound like a uke.

I want to stress Im not trying to start an arguement. I'm just trying to understand. Also, I came to uke from guitar, because a uke doesnt sound like a guitar.

Every instrument family has it's share of "strange cousins." Guitars have a very diverse family. Mandolins come in a variety of shapes. Banjos can be almost bizarre at times. Ukuleles have just adapted to desire for more from a smaller package.

The banjolele (to me, anyway) is a reduced-size tenor banjo with nylon strings, no different than a parlor guitar is to a dreadnaught. The banjolele may be part of the ukulele family, but it's also part of the banjo family. The banjolele is convenient for travel and play in confined circumstances.

Cross-over instruments (such as the banjolele and the tenor guitar) come from a musical need satisfied by enterprising folk wiling to go "out of the box" to fulfill the need.

PhilUSAFRet
01-14-2015, 10:18 AM
Not difficult to understand if one wants to understand. Just sayin. :2cents: