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Brenda Wong
01-29-2015, 09:05 AM
It's snowing in Toronto (Canada) , stuck in the house so I decided I might as well do something - like changing strings on my new concert Kanile'a !

I followed the instruction from previous posts (see link below) + a super nice member emailed me with tips. Aaron from HMS already shown me how to do it when I was there. I have changed strings on my old Kala. No big deal. I can do it. :-)

Step 1: Decided to start with the G, it's the toughest, it should not snap .
I cut the Oasis string in half because that's how they came in. I think the half string is too long for my concert but too afraid to trim .

Step 2: carefully pulled out the original G . Follow the same style of knot and drop in the Oasis. Placed the pin back with the side that has a gap facing the bridge. Check to make sure it is at the same level as the other three pins. There is nothing to turn. You just push the pin down in place.

NIGHTMARE STARTED:
Step 3: start tightening the string
Step 4: heard a sound but nothing happened
Step 5: continue to turn , suddenly the string and the pin popped out of the slot.

Tried again, same thing happened. At this point I already worked up quite a sweat.

I quickly put the original string back in the hole . Start tightening the string, same thing happened , popped out of the slot as soon as it starting to tighten up. (I have the peg turner but choose to use my hand instead so it's not turning too quickly)

Second try, this time nothing popped but the string feels like it has reached the tightest max in F# . Too afraid to keep tuning to G. (I use digital tuner)

Will I hurt the uku neck by tuning too much if the string looks to be reaching it maximum tightness?

What did I do wrong? I am so scare. Now the uku just sit in the stand with a F# instead of G.

Local music store will charge $16 but I prefer to do it myself. It's one of those things you have to learn and get past the fear. Below is link to previous posts by others. Its sound so simple yet I can't do it. Am I the only dumb dumb?

http://forum.ukuleleunderground.com/archive/index.php/t-5681.html

deschutestrout
01-29-2015, 09:28 AM
If it's at F#, it is not at it's maximum tightness, as this string gauge is designed as a G ... are you sure it's not a low g and you're attempting to tune it to high g? In that case, STOP! Sometimes with the bridge pin style, you have to apply light pressure on the pin when you're tightening the string, or as you found out, it likes to pop out until it has some pressure from the tightened string to hold it in place. Hope this helps!

Brenda Wong
01-29-2015, 09:36 AM
If it's at F#, it is not at it's maximum tightness, as this string gauge is designed as a G ... are you sure it's not a low g and you're attempting to tune it to high g? In that case, STOP! Sometimes with the bridge pin style, you have to apply light pressure on the pin when you're tightening the string, or as you found out, it likes to pop out until it has some pressure from the tightened string to hold it in place. Hope this helps!

No it's a high G because I put back the original string when the new one keeps popping. New one is High G also but I have not gotten that far yet. I just developed this fear . It will take me days to make another attempt.

deschutestrout
01-29-2015, 09:50 AM
Are you positive you didn't already pass the correct pitch an octave ago? I would think the string would break in that case ... but maybe not. Compare it to the 1st string (A) on your other uke ... it should be tuned a step LOWER than that at G ... if it is in fact lower in pitch than the A on a properly tuned uke, but at F# ... you should be able to bring it up to proper G pitch. On the other hand, if it is HIGHER in pitch ... you passed the octave and are WAY to tight. Why do you think the string has reached maximum tension? If it's at the correct octave, your tuner is telling you otherwise.

Brenda Wong
01-29-2015, 09:56 AM
Are you positive you didn't already pass the correct pitch an octave ago? I would think the string would break in that case ... but maybe not. Compare it to the 1st string (A) on your other uke ... it should be tuned a step LOWER than that at G ... if it is in fact lower in pitch than the A on a properly tuned uke, but at F# ... you should be able to bring it up to proper G pitch. On the other hand, if it is HIGHER in pitch ... you passed the octave and are WAY to tight. Why do you think the string has reached maximum tension? If it's at the correct octave, your tuner is telling you otherwise.

The string feels very tight so I am afraid to keep tuning. No it did not pass the octave , I am sure of it.
I am talking about the original string that came with the uku NOT the new Oasis string I attempted to change. I was too afraid to change the Oasis so I put the original string back and that's when it feels tight by the time it reaches F#. I let it sit for a while, may be the string will stretch a little more. I knew it's trouble when I have nothing better to do this morning. :-(

peewee
01-29-2015, 09:59 AM
My advice is this:

The string should hold even without the pin. Knot the end of the string. Insert the knot in the hole. Use a bamboo skewer or similar to engage the string in the tiny notch that in the fretboard end of the hole. While keeping light tension so that the string and knot stay where they are, put a light amount of tension on the string using the tuner, just enough so it stays in place by itself (no hands). Then insert the pin. Then bring it up to tension. The pin is almost unnecessary, the knotted string should be holding on its own.

Unless you are tuning way too high, there isn't much to be afraid of. The worst I've had is the pin flying across the room and disappearing beneath a piece of furniture, or the knot coming untied. Have everyone wear safety goggles I suppose :)

good luck

WhenDogsSing
01-29-2015, 10:00 AM
Hold the pin down firm with your right thumb while you're tuning the string to pitch. You won't hurt anything by pushing down on the pin while you're tuning it up.

Brian1
01-29-2015, 10:02 AM
I don't know if this will help but my tuner has a setting for other instruments as well as for ukulele double check and make sure your settings on the tuner are either set to chromatic or for ukulele. If it is set for an instrument that doesn't normally tune to a G string it could show as an F# because the tuner does not expect to be tuning a "G".

For example if My tuner is set to Gutiar I play the C string and it shows as B even if my C string is tuned correctlly.

Also if there are any numbers you want the numbers to be 440.

Brenda Wong
01-29-2015, 10:05 AM
I don't know if this will help but my tuner has a setting for other instruments as well as for ukulele double check and make sure your settings on the tuner are either set to chromatic or for ukulele. If it is set for an instrument that doesn't normally tune to a G string it could show as an F# because the tuner does not expect to be tuning a "G".

Also if there are any numbers you want the numbers to be 440.

It's a tuner for ukulele only. It is very accurate. I can probably turn back to G , the string just feels very tight already so didn't want to take a chance. If the string snap, I would have to change all four strings .

Brenda Wong
01-29-2015, 10:07 AM
Hold the pin down firm with your right thumb while you're tuning the string to pitch. You won't hurt anything by pushing down on the pin while you're tuning it up.

I should try this. Thanks

Brenda Wong
01-29-2015, 10:08 AM
My advice is this:

The string should hold even without the pin. Knot the end of the string. Insert the knot in the hole. Use a bamboo skewer or similar to engage the string in the tiny notch that in the fretboard end of the hole. While keeping light tension so that the string and knot stay where they are, put a light amount of tension on the string using the tuner, just enough so it stays in place by itself (no hands). Then insert the pin. Then bring it up to tension. The pin is almost unnecessary, the knotted string should be holding on its own.

Unless you are tuning way too high, there isn't much to be afraid of. The worst I've had is the pin flying across the room and disappearing beneath a piece of furniture, or the knot coming untied. Have everyone wear safety goggles I suppose :)

good luck

I am also afraid of the pin flying across the room or break because it's plastic. Won't be able to buy part. Gosh I wish I could bring Aaron home !!! Where is he when I needed him. LOL

deschutestrout
01-29-2015, 10:16 AM
You'll get it. just follow all the advice posted here, then tune your uke ;)

Telperion
01-29-2015, 10:22 AM
This topic comes up periodically on the forum. When I got my first uke with a pin bridge, I had the same thing happen to me too. It's a little startling, but it shouldn't be a big deal. I seriously doubt you are damaging the neck or anything like that. Stringing a pin bridge starts with a good, and sufficiently bulky knot. I typically use a figure 8 knot, and for thin very gauge strings, I'll add an extra overhand knot to the figure 8. Next, insert the string into the pin hole, and feed a couple of inches into the body of the uke. The pin hole should have a slot cut on the side closest to the saddle. Make sure the string is in this slot, then insert the pin. Seat the pin with moderate pressure (not too hard, but enough to wedge it in). Next pull the string tight, and if it is properly fitted in the slot, it should slide until the knot makes contact with the pin. There is a very good diagram on this old UU thread (I even think it is a Kanilea that is depicted!).

http://forum.ukuleleunderground.com/showthread.php?32269-Bridge-Pin-Missile-Yikes

I hope this helps. Good luck, and don't give up! You will get it!

-Steve

Edit: Just saw Peewee's advice, and it is good advice. The only difference for me, is that I actually put the pin in place before I attach the string to the tuner. The bottom line is that the string needs to be in the slot, and the knot ends up trapped against the side of the pin. It sounds like the knot is contacting the bottom of the pin in your case, thus pulling the pin out of the hole. Best of luck!

strumsilly
01-29-2015, 10:22 AM
You'll get it. just follow all the advice posted here, then tune your uke ;)
This is why , though attractive, I dislike pin bridges.
make a big knot, but not too big to go through the hole. put the pin in , and while holding the pin , pull on the string till no more slips out.. then put it through the peg and tighten while pressing on the pin. you should be good to go.

Brenda Wong
01-29-2015, 10:42 AM
You guys made it sound so easy. :-( I need to work up the courage to give it another go. At least now I know I should keep a finger on the pin while I tighten the string ( hope I read it right).
This strings changing 'move' is very frightening and intimidating. :-)

Brenda Wong
01-29-2015, 10:54 AM
This topic comes up periodically on the forum. When I got my first uke with a pin bridge, I had the same thing happen to me too. It's a little startling, but it shouldn't be a big deal. I seriously doubt you are damaging the neck or anything like that. Stringing a pin bridge starts with a good, and sufficiently bulky knot. I typically use a figure 8 knot, and for thin very gauge strings, I'll add an extra overhand knot to the figure 8. Next, insert the string into the pin hole, and feed a couple of inches into the body of the uke. The pin hole should have a slot cut on the side closest to the saddle. Make sure the string is in this slot, then insert the pin. Seat the pin with moderate pressure (not too hard, but enough to wedge it in). Next pull the string tight, and if it is properly fitted in the slot, it should slide until the knot makes contact with the pin. There is a very good diagram on this old UU thread (I even think it is a Kanilea that is depicted!).

http://forum.ukuleleunderground.com/showthread.php?32269-Bridge-Pin-Missile-Yikes

I hope this helps. Good luck, and don't give up! You will get it!

-Steve

Edit: Just saw Peewee's advice, and it is good advice. The only difference for me, is that I actually put the pin in place before I attach the string to the tuner. The bottom line is that the string needs to be in the slot, and the knot ends up trapped against the side of the pin. It sounds like the knot is contacting the bottom of the pin in your case, thus pulling the pin out of the hole. Best of luck!

Thank you for the link but now I am even more confused. Shooting up the ceiling? LOL
The diagram helps . Thanks

keod
01-29-2015, 11:08 AM
I have a couple of Islander ukes (laminates made by Kanilea) with bridge pins- the design is slightly different than on the the solid Kanilea's but the principle is the same.
I too was really nervous the first time I changed strings. The discussion link that Telperion quoted above helped a lot. And the Ashley Stopper Knot was a godsend LOL. I was so worried about trying to tune an octave too high I got the free ipad app Instuner which shows the octave. But the advice given above is bang on (bring to slight tension and/or hold down the pin), you won't hurt anything - once you do it once successfully it becomes second nature.
One thing I have found is that it seems harder and the tension higher than anticipated when the humidity is low.

deschutestrout
01-29-2015, 11:16 AM
The string isn't smart enough to know whether it's held in place by a knot and pin, or run through a hole and wrapped around itself. It just wants tuned ;)

deschutestrout
01-29-2015, 11:30 AM
It's possible that your uke is giving you problems because you keep referring to it as a "parasitic louse" ... that's the meaning of the word "uku" wink wink with tongue sticking out

Booli
01-29-2015, 02:11 PM
Hi Brenda,

One thing to realize is that the pin is not supposed to hold the string tension, instead the bottom of the bridge is supposed to hold the string tension, and the pin merely holds the string in position so that the string knot can rest against the underside of the bridge.

If your bridge pin pops out, it is because the knot is pushing against the end of the pin, which is incorrect installation, as others have mentioned here, you should have a large enough knot, and have the knot pull up against the underside of the bridge, and NOT against the pin.

It takes a little finesse to feel that the string has 'locked' in.

If instead you have the string knot pulling up the bridge pin, there's simply no way that a friction-fit tapered bridge pin is going to resist the approximate 15lbs of transverse tension force from the string, and NOT pop out.

Pls let me know if this makes sense to you. If not, I will try to find another explanation (or video) and provide you a link.

-Booli

SweetWaterBlue
01-29-2015, 02:15 PM
I used to have this problem with my guitars that have bridge pins like your uke does. It helps if you understand that the purpose of the pin is not to hold the string in. Instead, it is supposed to hold the knot against the soundboard. The knot or in my case a ball on the end of the string then holds the sting in. The pin just keeps it from moving into the hole and popping out. On my guitar, I can of course put my hand inside and feel it, but with a uke you just have to learn to do it by feel.

mm stan
01-29-2015, 04:01 PM
Aloha Brenda,
It has happened to me too on certain ukes just as you described
Since I cannot have your uke In front of me it is hard to evaluate the
Issue you may have, while others are being helpful they cannot have
The uke in their hands, strings could have been packaged wrong or
Mislabeled, mis stringed or you are a octave high to the next g.. your friend, stan
While I could give suggestions, I will not at this time, as I don't want
To be responsible if anything goes wrong I would feel bad if you damaged
Your uke in the process. Go to a shop to have your strings installed
By a qualified, luthier..it is cheap and if anything goes wrong they will
Be responsible. . After the strings are Installed check the action on
The 12th fret if it was same as before. .no higher good luck
As for the shooting bridge pins, if the hole is loose put a thin piece
Of fabric as a shim to tighten the pin and set.

good_uke_boy
01-29-2015, 04:35 PM
When it comes to ukulele string knots, I've found this link to be helpful:
http://www.pohakuukulele.com/pages/t_knots.html
I've never owned an instrument with a bridge pin, and haven't used this knot when stringing up a bridge pin.

anthonyg
01-29-2015, 04:38 PM
Bridge pin bridges work GREAT with steel strings with ball ends. NOT so great with nylon strings without ball ends. As has been stated, the knot you tie in the string needs to catch on the underside of the bridge. The pin only pushes sideways to prevent any chance of the string dislodging. Its a STUPID system on a ukulele. Its good for 2 things however, It looks COOL so its a fashion statement. Also, on a sightly more practicle note the design means that there is NO chance of the bridge lifting off due to string tension.

Try making you own "ball ends" with some sinkers or something such and the bridge pin system will work a little better.

Anthony

deschutestrout
01-29-2015, 04:48 PM
And...where's Brenda Wong? :D

Brenda Wong
01-29-2015, 04:52 PM
Hi Brenda,

One thing to realize is that the pin is not supposed to hold the string tension, instead the bottom of the bridge is supposed to hold the string tension, and the pin merely holds the string in position so that the string knot can rest against the underside of the bridge.

If your bridge pin pops out, it is because the knot is pushing against the end of the pin, which is incorrect installation, as others have mentioned here, you should have a large enough knot, and have the knot pull up against the underside of the bridge, and NOT against the pin.

It takes a little finesse to feel that the string has 'locked' in.

If instead you have the string knot pulling up the bridge pin, there's simply no way that a friction-fit tapered bridge pin is going to resist the approximate 15lbs of transverse tension force from the string, and NOT pop out.

Pls let me know if this makes sense to you. If not, I will try to find another explanation (or video) and provide you a link.

-Booli
Hi Booli
Oasis string is much thinner than the set of Aquila that came with the Kanile'a . I will tie a bigger knot once I work up the courage to make another attempt.
I finally got the Aquila string back in tune after I let it rest for a while so I didn't lose any practise time tonight.
Still want to get over this string changing fear!

Brenda Wong
01-29-2015, 04:54 PM
And...where's Brenda Wong? :D

Hiding under the cover ! Ha ha.

deschutestrout
01-29-2015, 05:00 PM
Hiding under the cover ! Ha ha.

Nothing to be afraid of. Go for it. Restring, re-tune and uke away!

Brenda Wong
01-29-2015, 05:07 PM
I
Aloha Brenda,
It has happened to me too on certain ukes just as you described
Since I cannot have your uke In front of me it is hard to evaluate the
Issue you may have, while others are being helpful they cannot have
The uke in their hands, strings could have been packaged wrong or
Mislabeled, mis stringed or you are a octave high to the next g.. your friend, stan
While I could give suggestions, I will not at this time, as I don't want
To be responsible if anything goes wrong I would feel bad if you damaged
Your uke in the process. Go to a shop to have your strings installed
By a qualified, luthier..it is cheap and if anything goes wrong they will
Be responsible. . After the strings are Installed check the action on
The 12th fret if it was same as before. .no higher good luck
As for the shooting bridge pins, if the hole is loose put a thin piece
Of fabric as a shim to tighten the pin and set.

Nothing is cheap in Canada . :-).
I need to get over this fear! First worry is the risk of damaging the uku. Second worry is Oasis string is not available here. If it snap, I am in trouble! :-(

Brenda Wong
01-29-2015, 05:08 PM
When it comes to ukulele string knots, I've found this link to be helpful:
http://www.pohakuukulele.com/pages/t_knots.html
I've never owned an instrument with a bridge pin, and haven't used this knot when stringing up a bridge pin.


I like this, very clear instruction on the knot technique ! Thanks

Brenda Wong
01-29-2015, 05:10 PM
In addition to the stuff about the pin, check the octave of the G string which seems too tight. With a tuner you can end up in a higher octave and it wont show on the display. First make sure your E string is tuned. Then find the note at the third fret which is G, fret the note and play it against your G string. You will notice straight away if the G string in in a high octave and you need to loosen it.
So get ready to try again. First get the knot to sit in the pin as described. Then check the octave of the G string and adjust if necessary. Next get out your spare string so you can see it. Also get a clean handkerchief. Now you are ready to try again. The string should break or pop out before any wooden part will break.
So start again, but when you are winding the tuner, put the handkerchief over the pin, then if it does pop it wont go anywhere, and the string wont fly up and hit you. When the string has settled then take off the handkerchief and check the tuning, keep repeating until you get the string in tune. Soon you will be playing and complaining how long it takes the strings to settle.

So true about complaining strings don't stay in tune! Very very true. Lol

deschutestrout
01-29-2015, 06:28 PM
String and tune your uke. You'll be so happy when it's done :-)

Booli
01-29-2015, 06:43 PM
So true about complaining strings don't stay in tune! Very very true. Lol

re: strings staying in tune, you might want to read my posts here:

http://forum.ukuleleunderground.com/showthread.php?101051-How-often-do-you-change-strings&p=1586357#post1586357

and here:

https://www.reddit.com/r/ukulele/comments/2a7kgg/want_to_get_a_new_tuning_mechanism_for_my_makala/cisgldx

mm stan
01-29-2015, 10:07 PM
Aloha Brenda,
I've strung alot of ukes, most times a thinner string does not affect the tightness of the peg in the hole, if the pegs and diameter of the holes are consistent, more times
The peg height are the same. ..BUT not always push them in until they feel tightly secure.
Also high tension is not good sign and should be taken seriously, a bent neck is a serious structural damage
And costly to fix, go with caution. . If you think it may be the strings, try another brand and go with
Light or medium tension. Good luck

Brenda Wong
01-30-2015, 04:29 AM
Aloha Brenda,
I've strung alot of ukes, most times a thinner string does not affect the tightness of the peg in the hole, if the pegs and diameter of the holes are consistent, more times
The peg height are the same. ..BUT not always push them in until they feel tightly secure.
Also high tension is not good sign and should be taken seriously, a bent neck is a serious structural damage
And costly to fix, go with caution. . If you think it may be the strings, try another brand and go with
Light or medium tension. Good luck

Thanks MM Stan (and a much belated Happy Birthday too) . The string felt tight is actually the string that came with the Kanile'a . I took it out to install the Oasis when it failed I put the original back in that's when I notice the string felt tight sitting in F#. It's all good now after I let it sit for a few hours.
Oasis is much thinner but I have not gotten that far to install and tune . I need more time to work up that courage to give it another go. For now I am back to using what came with the Kanile'a. :-(

Brenda Wong
01-30-2015, 04:31 AM
re: strings staying in tune, you might want to read my posts here:

http://forum.ukuleleunderground.com/showthread.php?101051-How-often-do-you-change-strings&p=1586357#post1586357

and here:

https://www.reddit.com/r/ukulele/comments/2a7kgg/want_to_get_a_new_tuning_mechanism_for_my_makala/cisgldx


Yes it takes about the same 3 weeks you mentioned in the above thread. It is annoying but we all get used to it after a while. :-)

HBolte
01-30-2015, 04:45 AM
Hold the pin down firm with your right thumb while you're tuning the string to pitch. You won't hurt anything by pushing down on the pin while you're tuning it up.

Exactly what I do...

Brenda Wong
01-30-2015, 04:57 PM
I am a determine person! Finally got all four strings changed with the help of my equally determine husband who obviously paid more attention to Aaron at HMS than me.
Thank you for all the great advises and sharing your experience. I carefully read every single suggestion before I worked up the courage. :-)
The A string popped once but managed to re-string. These Oasis strings are almost invisible , clear and very thin. I really like the crystal clear sound from these strings. I guess you can say mission accomplished for now unless one of the strings snap in the middle of the night which had happen before on the Kala.
I am now good for at least a few months before I have to repeat the same process again! Have I overcome the fear? Probably not ! The not able to see and feel drop pin system made me very uncomfortable !

deschutestrout
01-30-2015, 05:19 PM
yaHOO! Well done!

tangimango
01-30-2015, 05:36 PM
love the happy ending. now play away

mm stan
01-31-2015, 12:33 AM
Thank you for the b day greetings. Yes a lighter Guage string is usually lower tension
Better playability but you sacrifice on rich tone, some prefer the bright tone and comfort of them.

Kekani
01-31-2015, 11:11 AM
It's possible that your uke is giving you problems because you keep referring to it as a "parasitic louse" ... that's the meaning of the word "uku" wink wink with tongue sticking out
I already tried. Obviously, not being heeded. One of my friends was frustrated with his buzzing uke (long long story of EVERYONE who tried to look at it and fix it - must be harmonic). One day I told him he needs to love his instrument, and he did. Now its back in his rotation.

Sorry for the derail, but I thought this to be important as it seems the OP will have a long relationship with `ukulele, hopefully.


Yes a lighter Guage string is usually lower tension
Better playability but you sacrifice on rich tone, some prefer the bright tone and comfort of them.
Be careful with this one Stan. We just discussed in the Lounge string preferences, and some builders had more than one favorite, myself included. Personally, I like higher tension strings with my Spruce tops - I can usually (not always, depends on the build) get away with lower action, which makes for easier play. Normal tensions I usually set higher, but once you play high tensions, the normals seem floppy. YMMV.

Back on track, I like bridge pins (was wondering what a "drop pin" was), used to do them myself. Cannot beat the break angle, unless you go pinless. But, was a PITA because I layed a CF sheet under the bridge, just for longevity. Of course, I did this with pinless as well. Once upon a time.

Dan Uke
01-31-2015, 04:01 PM
It's possible that your uke is giving you problems because you keep referring to it as a "parasitic louse" ... that's the meaning of the word "uku" wink wink with tongue sticking out

yeah, people in HI says they got ukus (lice) in their hair and play ukes.

peterbright
01-31-2015, 05:36 PM
You are way too funny

Brenda Wong
01-31-2015, 06:50 PM
Changing strings is not the scariest part. It's the tuning back to pitch that scare me . When the string starts to tighten up, I just wait for that pop or string snapping sound. So glad I am good for a few months for now!

deschutestrout
01-31-2015, 07:33 PM
Just beware of lice. :rolleyes:

mm stan
01-31-2015, 11:41 PM
Changing strings is not the scariest part. It's the tuning back to pitch that scare me . When the string starts to tighten up, I just wait for that pop or string snapping sound. So glad I am good for a few months for now!
nothing better than your own intuition and judgement , go on what you feel is right....after all tell me someone online really knows what your particular
situation is without holding the ukulele themselves... at least they keep the luthiers busy :)

Booli
02-01-2015, 02:49 AM
Changing strings... So glad I am good for a few months for now!

Where did you learn that strings wear out in 'months'? I've never seen this information anywhere, and I am suspect that it is bad advice.

Unless you wear the strings out, by playing really hard (maniacally agressive strumming) for like 3-4 hrs per day, and/or live in extreme cold or extreme heat, and unless you break a string, your strings should last a LONG time, like maybe even like a year before the sound changes significantly.

However, do you play EVERY day? and for how long? The number of hours that the string is vibrating will determine it's useful life before they 'go bad' and dont sound or feel good any more.

I'd bet that Jake Shimabukuro, when he's on tour and doing performances 6 nights per week, as well as workshops 6 days per week can easily put 80-100 hrs of play time on a set of strings, and as such probably changes them WEEKLY, and if one breaks, even more often, so you might want to use this as a reference...

Brenda Wong
02-01-2015, 03:12 AM
Where did you learn that strings wear out in 'months'? I've never seen this information anywhere, and I am suspect that it is bad advice.

Unless you wear the strings out, by playing really hard (maniacally agressive strumming) for like 3-4 hrs per day, and/or live in extreme cold or extreme heat, and unless you break a string, your strings should last a LONG time, like maybe even like a year before the sound changes significantly.

However, do you play EVERY day? and for how long? The number of hours that the string is vibrating will determine it's useful life before they 'go bad' and dont sound or feel good any more.

I'd bet that Jake Shimabukuro, when he's on tour and doing performances 6 nights per week, as well as workshops 6 days per week can easily put 80-100 hrs of play time on a set of strings, and as such probably changes them WEEKLY, and if one breaks, even more often, so you might want to use this as a reference...


I practise quite often , average an hour in the morning, an hour or more in the evening . That's wonderful news that I am good for more than a few months. thanks! My friend has been asking me to change hers, I told her I can do it but she has to do the tuning (strings tightening) final step. Not going there!

Booli
02-01-2015, 03:35 AM
I practise quite often , average an hour in the morning, an hour or more in the evening . That's wonderful news that I am good for more than a few months. thanks! My friend has been asking me to change hers, I told her I can do it but she has to do the tuning (strings tightening) final step. Not going there!

Maybe I am mistaken and was incorrect in my comments. I'm sorry.

Assuming that there is any level of merit at all to my analogy of Jake's playing...:)

Taking into account your schedule, and if you aligned it with 100 hrs of play time, divided by 2 hrs per day, that gives you 50 days.

So maybe, in like 2 months you should 'check' your strings in see if they need to be replaced.

Again, you are more on the ball with this than I, and I am sorry if I misspoke or gave improper advice.

Brenda, please accept my apologies.


I play at least 1-2 hrs per day, like 5-6 days per week, but that playing is spread across several ukes, and I change strings all the time to try new sets, and I've never gotten to the point where the strings seem worn out, so I really have no idea what that sounds like, or feels/looks like, since I save all the strings that I've removed (when done trying them out) in the packages, and later test them on other instruments. For sets of strings that I dont like, they get a few weeks to settle in, then if I dont like them, they get removed, but maybe only have like 20-30 hrs of play time on them at that point.