PDA

View Full Version : Outside of the box



Kekani
01-31-2015, 11:20 AM
So, since Beau and I are derailing a thread, I thought I'd just start a new one.

Background: we've be in some discussion on building techniques, which we've been stealing off each other (thanks to his awesome vids). Of course, this is nothing new, with Pete's vids, and Chuck's commentary, Rick's input, et al.

In this thread, I plan on taking pics of my oft questioned M&T neck angle jig, and the accompanying jigs as well. I call this outside the box, because I don't think its a normal way to build, and I'm sure others have the same if they care to share.

Current question from Beau in the other thread: Do you butt the end of your fingerboard up against the headstock veneer then have the nut sitting on a half depth step in the end of the fingerboard???- This is beginning to sound like a great idea to me.

Yes. I didn't create this. Since I started playing bass, my Fender MIM PBass has this, and I've seen it before as well. Since I started binding the FB with BWB purfling (v without, as I've usually done it), I actually inset the nut between the binding, but not the purfling. Andrew has a shot of this on one of his old listings http://www.theukulelesite.com/aaron-oya-custom-spruce-maple-tenor.html

With just the binding, I actually did a cutout of the binding, so the nut would be completely seen from the side. I did a few on the inside, but because I beveled the binding at the time, I thought it was a little too thin at the top where the binding met the nut.

Note: because I butt the end to the veneer, and I bind the soundhole end, the 1/8" slot under the fretboard runs end to end. I used to stop before the ends, but not needed since its covered anyway. Much safer to do on the router table.

Beau Hannam Ukuleles
01-31-2015, 11:40 AM
So, by setting the your (1/8"?) nut between the binding, was your neck at the nut about 4-6mm wider?, assuming you kept the normal string spacing at the nut or did you just have less bone from nut edge to string???

I do 4mm from nut edge to string center.

Kekani
01-31-2015, 12:45 PM
3/16" nut (I use a Tusq guitar blank) actually got narrowed since I put it between the bindings. Normal string spacing means less material from the edge to the string.

However, once upon a time, I increased the width of my fretboard 1/32" on each side. THEN I added on 1/16" binding outside of the fretwire, so yes, my necks are wider than most (if not all) factory instruments, but the string spacing is the same. Now, I extend the fretwire to the edge over the binding (like you do).

If I did a "normal" width fretboard, I'd do the cutout of the binding, otherwise I think there would be too little material from the edge to the string. Be sure the binding and purfling are glued WELL. Ask me how I know?

I guess this would qualify as an out of the box way to do things, as far as the wider neck. I have a theory - if you play with good technique (like a classical guitarist - and since you're spending over $1K on an instrument I think you should - just like I think I shouldn't have to put a 3rd fret marker) a wider fretboard shouldn't matter. Add in a D shaped neck (which I can make thinner because of the CF), a wider fretboard shouldn't matter. And, it allows pulling of strings without pulling off.

I guess my theory, for me, works. I've had no complaints, so far, about the wide neck. If I did, then I'm not really the builder for them. Of course, I know of a certain factory that changed their neck profile on their customs to one similar to mine (actually, they got theirs to go thinner). Their customers notice the difference, and I heard of at least one that asked for the different profile. This is why when I see discussions about strings spacing in Uke Talk, it sort of just passes me by because that's a variable that can be changed a lot on a wider neck.

Beau Hannam Ukuleles
02-01-2015, 08:22 AM
Using a guitar saddle as a nut is a good idea. My nuts are usually 4mm- 5mm.

Your CF is 1/8" by 3/8" right?

I use a CF 5mm x 6mm (or sometimes 1/4" x1/4") but id like to do 3/8 x 3/8 to be about to get a super thin neck without the worry. Actually, as the strength of CF is more in the depth of it, not the width, your 1/8 x 3/8" would probably just be as strong.

Kekani
02-01-2015, 12:19 PM
Using a guitar saddle as a nut is a good idea. My nuts are usually 4mm- 5mm.

Your CF is 1/8" by 3/8" right?

I use a CF 5mm x 6mm (or sometimes 1/4" x1/4") but id like to do 3/8 x 3/8 to be about to get a super thin neck without the worry. Actually, as the strength of CF is more in the depth of it, not the width, your 1/8 x 3/8" would probably just be as strong.
I actually use a guitar nut blank, only because my teacher used 3/16. I like it because it gives a little more heft towards the edges, and I've never had an issue with the nut cracking (did I say that?) vs. 1/8" nuts.

I've used the StewMac .200 in the past (in fact, used my last piece last week to reinforce my son's OC Paddle. I didn't want to be "locked in" to their router bit. So yes, it's now 1/8" x 3/8". From a hand flex perspective, its just as stiff as the wider StewMac. Totally unscientific.

Once, I actually sanded through to the CF (the current ones). This is what made me install it a little shallower, read: proud of the neck. And then I thought, why should I sand it back down? Just leave it there and run a slot in the bottom of the fretboard. There's your story of how that started. From a mistake. . .

I think 1/4" x 3/8" would work well for you, especially if you ever build a M&T neck angle jig - you could use it to line up guitar necks as well (aren't guitar truss rods 1/4"). I'd just use an adapter (1/8" to 1/4") for a guitar neck. Yes, I built my jig big enough for guitars.

Why do I use 1/8"? Because its cheaper, and it works. And I'd rather run a small 1/8" slot in the bottom of the fretboard.

Kekani
02-22-2015, 08:12 AM
Been a little busy. Here's a pic of my basses; custom on the left, Fender on the right. These show the nut "full width" of the fretboard. My custom has my "old style" binding on (with no purfling).
76463

And here's how it translates to `ukulele with a bound fretboard.
76464

Kekani
02-22-2015, 08:28 AM
There was conversation recently on saddles, compensation, and angles.

Here's what I mean when I angle it back 7 degrees. Created by Rick Turner (as I understand), and printed in an advanced installation technique by Fishman, for pickup installations. All of my instruments have this, for reasons other than just pickups.
http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll290/kekani427/Mobile%20Uploads/3742E6F0-509D-4550-A80E-ED7CE2B12F1E_zpsex2ng37f.jpg (http://s291.photobucket.com/user/kekani427/media/Mobile%20Uploads/3742E6F0-509D-4550-A80E-ED7CE2B12F1E_zpsex2ng37f.jpg.html)

For compensation, a 1/8" saddle will take care of A to low g on a tenor. Sort of difficult to see, but if you look at the edges, you can see the peak on the 1st string is opposite of the peak on the 4th string. Not so out of the box, but also not so common on production instruments.
http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll290/kekani427/Mobile%20Uploads/A5D24AA7-4919-49B6-B472-51289F79D902_zpsaay7spac.jpg (http://s291.photobucket.com/user/kekani427/media/Mobile%20Uploads/A5D24AA7-4919-49B6-B472-51289F79D902_zpsaay7spac.jpg.html)

Allen
02-22-2015, 09:17 AM
I've been building with the same tipped back saddle for over 7 years now as well. And yes, there are all kinds of reasons to do this.

It's one of those "little things" in building that turns out to be a really big thing.

Kekani
02-22-2015, 07:33 PM
It's one of those "little things" in building that turns out to be a really big thing.
I think that should be a subtitle to this thread. As I think about it, I realize the "little things" that turn out big, is the stuff you don't see in plans, or basic instruction/construction.

As suggested at the start of this thread, here's a quick pick of my Mortise & Tenon neck angle jig.
Note: Initially, I was going to make it really simple and leave out the "angle" part of the jig. I'm glad I didn't.
And, I think I made it big enough to fit guitar necks, though the body may be tight, or it won't fit at all. I'll cross that bridge when I get to it - the mortise is easier to jig up than the tenon, imo.
http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll290/kekani427/Mobile%20Uploads/A3C8133C-55D7-4BFE-8DE4-30D053E4F7F3_zpsxw1iemyb.jpg (http://s291.photobucket.com/user/kekani427/media/Mobile%20Uploads/A3C8133C-55D7-4BFE-8DE4-30D053E4F7F3_zpsxw1iemyb.jpg.html)

Kekani
02-28-2015, 05:58 PM
How to cut a side profile (linked from side cutting sled thread). Not for the meek.
http://forum.ukuleleunderground.com/showthread.php?105120-side-trimming-sled

Kekani
03-14-2015, 08:30 AM
Back to the neck angle jig. I don't use it often since its only one step in the process (okay, 2 steps), but I used it today. Starting with the Tenon on the neck, you can see where the 1/8" slot in put in the neck for the Carbon Fiber rod is used to line up for this jig.
77396

Of course, I actually have the inserts installed, so this is a mock-up, but you get the idea.
77397

Kekani
03-14-2015, 08:41 AM
Because this is not just a tenon cutting jig, but a "neck angle jig", this is where to set that angle, with the body on top.
http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll290/kekani427/Mobile%20Uploads/25F6D042-D34D-408D-92A9-AF715311AE49_zpscpv2lkqt.jpg (http://s291.photobucket.com/user/kekani427/media/Mobile%20Uploads/25F6D042-D34D-408D-92A9-AF715311AE49_zpscpv2lkqt.jpg.html)


And you can see my high tech knob and bolt assembly, including high speed bearings (because I adjust it so fast. . . )
http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll290/kekani427/Mobile%20Uploads/BA1799AA-988F-46CE-94B1-6997FCE3E8A6_zpsp5xowdzz.jpg (http://s291.photobucket.com/user/kekani427/media/Mobile%20Uploads/BA1799AA-988F-46CE-94B1-6997FCE3E8A6_zpsp5xowdzz.jpg.html)

And may as well show the mortise end as well. Again with high tech knob assembly. The cradle in the back that squeezes the body to hold it is not only concave to match the radius, but is also lined with cork. By the way, laser cut templates are courtesy of some guy in Kalihi, runs an `ukulele factory. But the factory is moving, so they won't be in Kalihi for much longer.
http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll290/kekani427/Mobile%20Uploads/B3D9564F-A43E-4715-B286-AFD749ADA83C_zpspypgauhr.jpg (http://s291.photobucket.com/user/kekani427/media/Mobile%20Uploads/B3D9564F-A43E-4715-B286-AFD749ADA83C_zpspypgauhr.jpg.html)

Kekani
03-21-2015, 10:31 PM
Many ways to cut binding ledges, here's mine. I made it like this to specifically address my intent to retain the DeWalt bearing foot, which allows me infinite adjustments for the binding, although I only use it in two positions (I should actually build another one, which I may in the future).

Also, its made with scrap Baltic Birch ply, so most of the pieces came from offcuts. Function before form certainly applies here.
http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll290/kekani427/Mobile%20Uploads/5B16F459-A194-47CC-AC6A-DFA149D27957_zpsrodwwwu0.jpg (http://s291.photobucket.com/user/kekani427/media/Mobile%20Uploads/5B16F459-A194-47CC-AC6A-DFA149D27957_zpsrodwwwu0.jpg.html)

Here's what the bearing foot looks like - I modified it for a skateboard bearing with another bearing spaced out to do it horizontally, like Taylor does it, but I like this way much better.
http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll290/kekani427/Mobile%20Uploads/720AB79E-2284-4DCB-AB7E-4D98F7410C49_zpsyvuqjsmo.jpg (http://s291.photobucket.com/user/kekani427/media/Mobile%20Uploads/720AB79E-2284-4DCB-AB7E-4D98F7410C49_zpsyvuqjsmo.jpg.html)

This is obviously mocked up, but you get the gist of where the bearing rides, where the top contacts, and where the bit cuts.
http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll290/kekani427/Mobile%20Uploads/2912E9BB-9598-4881-B55E-CB9CF17BB22E_zpsz7okvahw.jpg (http://s291.photobucket.com/user/kekani427/media/Mobile%20Uploads/2912E9BB-9598-4881-B55E-CB9CF17BB22E_zpsz7okvahw.jpg.html)

The cradle is very simple, with 3 posts glued snug, and one that has a small piece of wood clamped to keep it tight. This is where its nice to have the parallelogram type of jig to extend the laminate trimmer out to clear the clamp as it comes around (I could affix a screw, but its good and easy as it). I have a small 1/2" spacer under the upper bout, concaved to match the radius for when the top is being cut (hard to see in this pic).
http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll290/kekani427/Mobile%20Uploads/9E2DCA10-2EF7-4178-9167-51516EB82118_zpsmomqzuvc.jpg (http://s291.photobucket.com/user/kekani427/media/Mobile%20Uploads/9E2DCA10-2EF7-4178-9167-51516EB82118_zpsmomqzuvc.jpg.html)

Sorry, duplicate pic below. Not sure how to delete it.

Kekani
03-22-2015, 01:37 PM
Since I did some binding today, without getting into the taping details, which I use MUCH less now, you can tell by the pics how its done. Admittedly, if I didn't have kids and they didn't have bikes, I'm not sure I would've actually gone out and bought this. I would've probably bought rope at some point, but now, I'd actually buy tubes when these are no longer serviceable.
77746

Beau Hannam Ukuleles
03-23-2015, 03:32 AM
Jig master- i laughed when i saw your 45 degree reinforcements cut like steps as thats exactly what i did!

Kekani
03-23-2015, 07:17 AM
Jig master- i laughed when i saw your 45 degree reinforcements cut like steps as thats exactly what i did!

Pure woodworking technique. I actually had those as clamping jigs when I built my bass and PA cabs.

I bet if we spent a session together just going through our processes, they'd be similar enough that we'd steal tips and add them to our own style, without having to implement a completely different change.

Kevin Waldron
03-23-2015, 02:50 PM
Not to rain on you guys parade but there is a commercial jig made for doing tenon, dovetail, floating tenon, and several other styles in addition to allowing for neck angle.... it's pricey but excellent quality and it will work for a multitude of instruments with guitar-ukulele style necks.... we've probably cut several thousand necks with the jigs...... usually about a 5 minute process. We typically would do dovetail but tenon is as simple.....( maybe a little slower because you have to tap the necks for brass insert and insert them prior to cutting the tenon is the easiest and least destructive method...)

http://www.luthiertool.com/page76.html

Including some pictures one shows one of our employee's with a guitar box setup to get the neck angle correct for the top.... the other shows my son Jon cutting a ukulele dovetail on a neck. Angle cheeks are easy to do by hand for the rounded body shapes on the ukulele but it can also be accomplished in the jig....

Blessings,

Kevin

7776977770777717777277773

Beau Hannam Ukuleles
03-23-2015, 03:50 PM
$749 !!!!!!!!!!!!!

Kevin Waldron
03-23-2015, 04:46 PM
15 instruments...... or necks = $50 per .......30 units = $25...... doesn't take long to pay for the investment if your doing this regular enough to merit the jig...... As I said takes very little time and takes a difficult part of the build and makes it simple. The jig also allows for center line layout corrections.

One could also use a plywood jig produced by John Simpson..... templates could be made to fit the ukulele....... jig is good but not in the same league as the all metal jig.... by LT but it does work well.

http://www.jsimpsonguitars.com/jigs/neckjig/neckjig5.html

We've stopped making everything excepting acrylic templates....... we averaged about 4 ukulele neck sells a week either through necks alone or kits..... if you have a desire to offer a good quality neck there is a market....

Blessings,

Kevin

Kekani
03-23-2015, 05:57 PM
If I were building full time, I'd find a need for the LT metal jig - that thing is bad ass. For me, and most of the guys here I would presume, it'd be a long time before ROI would be gained. Of course, this is me being a hypocrite - just dumped $760 on a Fuji Minimite 4.

After all, in the end, those with the most tools. . . wins!:cool:

Either way, M&T and/or Dovetail joints have not been as prevalent in `ukulele building as much as they are in guitars, by my best guesstimation. For me, it completely changes the way my instrument comes together, if only because I've built a bunch of my jigs around the "centerline" concept (being redundant of course).

At this point, and I may be wrong, but I think M&T's qualify for "out of the box" in this forum (not so at OLF of course), even though Ken is the dovetail king. . .

And thanks Kevin, for linking LT, just in case someone here reading this thread can gain something from there, if not the neck jig, maybe the self aligning binding jig - neat stuff.

Beau Hannam Ukuleles
03-31-2015, 08:01 AM
Here is my cheap ass tenon maker (or is it mortise??- i cant remember which is which- the female part.

The running enigma is that Aaron and I seem to build stuff either at the same time or with similar details- note my "Aaron like" step side reinforcements- i ripped them off when i had to use this jig for a guitar.

I route mine on the routing table and move the jig with the uke/guitar clamped in it (2 G clamps through the sound hole onto the transverse brace)
Most others seem to move the router around a stationary jig.

A few reasons why a fixed jig version is probably better is that,
1- I can't do neck sets on this and, (not a prob for ukes which are easy anyway)
2- you could have a dedicated router for it where as i have to muck around changing router bits on my table which i use for truss rods channels, trimming top/backs, general stuff.

7799377994

And aarons steps

77995

Kekani
04-12-2015, 08:29 PM
I just picked up a mini router - Dewalt DWP611 with the plunge base - now I can leave my PC810 in the router table. Neat router, great features, NOT a laminate trimmer.

Anyway, here's Sven's resawing technique, by hand (hope you don't mind):
http://forum.ukuleleunderground.com/showthread.php?106388-Resawing-by-hand

dustartist
04-12-2015, 09:20 PM
I love my Fuji Mini-Mite 4. Good investment.

Kekani
05-14-2015, 05:10 PM
Putting my new DWP611 to use. I actually picked up another one just because I like the vertical adjustment.

Because Beau asked, here is my new "infinitely adjustable" (as I've seen elsewhere) bearing foot. This particular setup is for headstocks, but I'm going to do the same for my body binding jig, and swap out the DeWalt laminate trimmer with a DWP611 and this type of setup.
79562

Here you can see the zero bar in use. No, its not adjustable, but I guess I could make it like that to fine tune.
7956379564

Beau Hannam Ukuleles
05-15-2015, 11:13 AM
Here are my 3x hand held routers - Grizzly and HF.
1- HF- (with purple bit) For routing off top and back over hang (dont need a $100 router for this job)
2- HF- For single depth cut of headstock binding/purfling channel with 1/4" down cut spiral bit.
3- Grizzly- For purflings with 1/4" down cut spiral bit.

Both the Grizzly and HF routers come with that side guide thingy (not sure what its called)- i WISH the Ridgid or Bosch Colt came with that as they are fantastic.
Grizzly router- http://www.grizzly.com/products/Trim-Router-Metal-Body/H7790

My 4th router is in a binding tower
4- Ridgid- with lmi bit and bearing (for .080" cut) and teflon rider thingy (the white stuff)- Teflon on ebay here:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/PTFE-Teflon-Film-Sheet-Plate-Thickness-0-3-0-5-1-2-3-4-5-6-8-10mm-B6R-/171446229097?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&var&hash=item27eafdd869

7959379594795957959679597

Kekani
12-08-2015, 04:56 PM
Because Beau asked, and I didn't want to hijack the other thread (which we already did), here's the bridge slotting jig, with back angle insert.
Here's all the pieces:
86225
With the angled insert for the saddle slot
86226
86227
Without the insert for the tie channel, added a spacer strip to push the router "out". Note the guidelines for "start" and "end"
86228
Probably one of my better pics showing the angle, with the insert underneath.
86229

It seems non-adjustable for my one size bridge. I've used it for my larger tiple bridge. The main thing is the "hold" piece is slightly smaller than the smallest bridge, as shown in the 4th pic, which doesn't have the insert.

And its clamped to my router table.

Clear as mud?

sequoia
12-08-2015, 06:10 PM
Ok. I sort of get it and it isn't as murky as mud. Your pictures are good. What I don't really get is why cut an angle at all into the bridge saddle slot. I'm assuming this is for compensation? Why not just cut a straight 90 degree saddle slot (like I do) and move the whole bridge back to compensate? What advantage is there in an angled slot? Does this have to do with torque and angle rotation? I hope not because it starts to give me a headache when I go there.

Thanks.

Kekani
12-08-2015, 09:01 PM
Ok. I sort of get it and it isn't as murky as mud. Your pictures are good. What I don't really get is why cut an angle at all into the bridge saddle slot. I'm assuming this is for compensation? Why not just cut a straight 90 degree saddle slot (like I do) and move the whole bridge back to compensate? What advantage is there in an angled slot? Does this have to do with torque and angle rotation? I hope not because it starts to give me a headache when I go there.

Thanks.
Posts #7 & #8 in this thread, Allen states it best. If you've built a number of instruments, and installed UST's, you'll immediately get the "why" of it.

Compensation? No, this is NOT the primary purpose. For me, it started specifically because most of my instruments have UST's installed.

What's really going to "bake your noodle"* is figuring out if the rotational axis under the bridge shifts, based on the angle of the saddle. And if it does, do you make any changes?

Some schools of though place the leading edge of the bridge patch in alignment with the front edge of the saddle, when its installed at 90 degrees. What happens when the lever angle of the saddle is tweaked (assuming the saddle acts as a lever)?

Don't ask me - my son is in AP Physics. . .

*The Oracle

Beau Hannam Ukuleles
12-09-2015, 04:00 AM
Cool Aaron- thanks heaps for the pics!!!!

1-So when you place a bridge blank in the routing jig- do you screw the ply down it snug fit the bridge with those angles holes???
2- And you ride the router only along that 1 front edge???

My bridge patches (CF only) are always bigger then my bridge- that they be at least 1/8" larger to the front and back of the bridge i consider important.- to the sides isn't as important.

Kekani
12-09-2015, 04:46 AM
Cool Aaron- thanks heaps for the pics!!!!

1-So when you place a bridge blank in the routing jig- do you screw the ply down it snug fit the bridge with those angles holes???
2- And you ride the router only along that 1 front edge???

My bridge patches (CF only) are always bigger then my bridge- that they be at least 1/8" larger to the front and back of the bridge i consider important.- to the sides isn't as important.
1. No, the moving piece is clamped; doesn't take much. The holes are Kreg to butt joint the ply.
2. Yes. Like I said, simple.

My patch is smaller front & back, but wider, which I consider more imprtant.
Finally, something we differ on.:D

Beau Hannam Ukuleles
12-09-2015, 04:54 AM
My patch is smaller front & back, but wider, which I consider more important.
Finally, something we differ on.:D

hahaha-
Doing that would promote the long diapole and lesson the cross diapole but only if the patch goes out pretty far to the sides.

Kekani
12-09-2015, 06:09 PM
Damn if I didn't have to look that up.

Beau Hannam Ukuleles
12-16-2015, 05:12 AM
Aaron- I'm making this saddle slot jig today- i'm going to call it "Myaaron", the female Camelot version of your fine name.
Perhaps Myarion" ???

Kekani
12-19-2015, 01:28 PM
Vacuum pressing. . .

While not necessarily out of the box, as there are a number of builders that use vacuum pressing. Anyway, I ordered the parts for this a while ago from Joe's, and it took a while for me to put together, just because of what I wanted to do with it, not just bridges, but also braces. I deviated from his 4" PVC plans and used what I had, and made a bed.

While I'm still working out the frame for to use it for braces, here's the bridge press in action. Unfortunately, there's a leak somewhere, so it "recharges" every minute, BUT, the compressor doesn't kick on as much as when I used to spray with it (now I have a Fuji, hence the past tense). There an extra piece of mesh that goes over the bridge to prevent damaging it from the coupling. Yes, there's so much pressure that it'll leave an indention in the bridge.

Beau, I actually worked with another Aaron. Imagine my surprise when I found out he was a she. Well, maybe she should've been a he, but lets not go there. . .

86607

Kekani
02-28-2016, 09:08 AM
Sometimes we create problems that don't exist. Or not. But that would be the crux of jigging I guess. What's wrong with a drill for side markers? Nothing, unless you don't have a the exact bit of .093", or smaller, which I can't find a pilot point for.

I have one of my odd "inlay bits" that spec out at .090, which is perfect for my .093 side dots. May as well jig it up for the drill press. Not sure why it took me so long to glue and screw together 3 pieces of wood.

Actually, I know why. It took me a sidetrack from ukulele to building speakers, bass cabs and guitar cabs to realize the value of Baltic Birch ply (I may have mentioned this already).

This should really be self explanatory, and not ground breaking. I'm sure most builders have a version of this to drill side dots. . .

8880488805

Beau Hannam Ukuleles
02-28-2016, 09:29 AM
i use 2mm side dots with a brad point bit- no jig- i used to measure it all out but I eye ball it now. I measure the fingerboard face dots though.

Allen
02-28-2016, 07:04 PM
I clamp the fret board in my milling vise and use the DRO on my milling machine. It can get a bit pedantic by looking at the 3rd decimal place but I always do a batch of boards at once and it goes pretty quick.

Kekani
03-07-2016, 08:45 PM
I clamp the fret board in my milling vise and use the DRO on my milling machine. It can get a bit pedantic by looking at the 3rd decimal place but I always do a batch of boards at once and it goes pretty quick.
If I ever get the room for a mill, I'm sure to find some uses for it.

In the meantime, and another not so out of the box, is my plate joining jig, Spanish style, so I'm told.
Many variations on the same take, but all self explanatory. Showed it to a friend who couldn't believe the simplicity, and made a bunch for production, out of Koa scraps. Go figure. . .
89049

Kekani
05-01-2016, 02:32 PM
Sometimes we create problems when one doesn't exist. I didn't have an issue with my tuning machines digging into the finish or getting loose like steel strings, but since I just finished 2 Tiples, I thought it couldn't hurt to address the tuning machine holes. And no, I didn't spring $80 for the StewMac step bit, although I'd did search high and low for a more cost effective version.

Here's what I came up with - Metric step drill with 4/6/8/10/12 mm steps, ground off the 12mm section, and marked for depth. Image has a new bit (just got in an extra bit, $5; actually, got 3 more), the ground bit, and a Hipshot closed gear tuning machine.
90771

If you look closely in the hole you'll see the step. Is it "perfect" like the StewMac probably is? Nah, but it's really snug compared to before. Just saying.
90772

Kekani
09-16-2016, 11:27 AM
Rare event - a build video from me.

Here is how to install the brass inserts into the Neck Tenon for the bolt-on M&T neck joint, using a Self-centering Doweling Jig.

Thanks Beau!


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=62B0T4dImJ8

Kevin Waldron
09-17-2016, 04:18 AM
Question..... why wait so long to put the inserts in?........ We place inserts in place prior to cutting the tenon!

If your using a template to cut the tenon this is not a problem....there is never tear out and the wood is always supported.......I'd also recommend using a glue that will take on the brass and the wood...... (we use Roo-Glue) glue works as a lubricant when treading the insert in place and also helps with not being able to pull the threaded insert out or stripping the wood fibers after you place the bolt in place (nothing worse than stripping your insert from the wood) ..... You can also get taps that are the same thread if you look at machine supply outfitters. In wood larger threads are always preferred....... finer threads intend for metal...

kw

Beau Hannam Ukuleles
09-17-2016, 08:19 AM
I fit the neck, about 90% of the way before i put the inserts in.
My tenons are about 20mm wide, but my heel is wide. I'd recommend using the widest tenon you can to minimize the tenon sides from blowing out.

Kekani
09-17-2016, 11:02 AM
Question..... why wait so long to put the inserts in?........ We place inserts in place prior to cutting the tenon!
Thought about doing that, specifically to eliminate tear out. I would agree, much better end result from a tearout perspective.

Because everything is registered off my centerline (for the CF rod), which is registered off one side, I haven't thought of how to get the holes for the inserts centered to incorporate into my process, yet. How do you center your holes on your neck blank?

I used a jig in the past to support the tenon cheeks, but the doweling jig is just, cool.

Kevin Waldron
09-18-2016, 02:42 AM
Our system is a commercial jig made by LuthierTools.......... not easy to show how it works.........have some pictures but want show the important stuff.....

Check this tool out...... our jig works on the same principle........ http://www.bridgecitytools.com/default/tools/drilling/drilling-jigs.html...... by the way this company has been making these type of fixtures for more than 25 years..... originally they started making them as center line scribes.....

kevin

Kekani
09-19-2016, 12:44 PM
I scoped out their block plane in the past. I'm thinking of getting the chopstick, just for fun, and for the plane.

Let me move some ukes first. . .

Kekani
09-25-2016, 08:48 PM
Because Beau asked, and I didn't want to hijack the other thread (which we already did), here's the bridge slotting jig, with back angle insert.
Here's all the pieces:
86225
With the angled insert for the saddle slot
86226
86227
Without the insert for the tie channel, added a spacer strip to push the router "out". Note the guidelines for "start" and "end"
86228
Probably one of my better pics showing the angle, with the insert underneath.
86229

It seems non-adjustable for my one size bridge. I've used it for my larger tiple bridge. The main thing is the "hold" piece is slightly smaller than the smallest bridge, as shown in the 4th pic, which doesn't have the insert.

And its clamped to my router table.

Clear as mud?
Ok, I finally did a video. Its fairly long, so just fast forward through the actual routing, when the dust collector is on.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PWVyTLI2q4Q

finkdaddy
08-19-2017, 05:20 AM
This thread has been a fantastic read! I've been away from building for a while, and now I'm beginning to remember all of the terrifying problems that I never truly addressed on my prior builds. I'm getting nervous just thinking about it!

Kekani
08-19-2017, 10:56 AM
Ok, I finally did a video. Its fairly long, so just fast forward through the actual routing, when the dust collector is on.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PWVyTLI2q4Q

UPDATE! I cleared this through Rick, because I like giving credit where it's due... The Turner Tilt-back Saddle originated when Rick came up with it for a guitar that was in his shop (belonged to Peter Frampton at the time).

Kekani
10-01-2017, 10:49 AM
Just another way to cut a headstock scarf joint. Been using the table saw for a long time. Had the sliding miter saw for a long time. Now I get to do this in 1 pass (even though the vid shows two - it was only the 2nd time I used it).


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5sw18X5VeI0&t=45s

sequoia
10-01-2017, 06:31 PM
Thanks Kekani. Good video. I get it.

Pete Howlett
10-01-2017, 10:38 PM
I use a drill to give me a 'known' and accurate depth...