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Timbuck
02-02-2015, 08:40 AM
I've just been reading some info on Titebond glue...Did you know it can stand freezing in the bottle up to 5 times and thawing out again.

It can be thinned by adding up to 5% water without affecting it's bonding strength.

And it can be stained to any colour using certain types of dye.

orangeena
02-02-2015, 11:56 PM
Glad you mentioned that as I just went down to the garage and it is flipping perishing! I have been concerned about it's abilities to cope with extremes. Do you know if it has a "best by" shelf life? I could go and look at the bottle, but as I said before the garage is flipping perishing ;-)

Wildestcat
02-03-2015, 03:33 AM
Glad you mentioned that as I just went down to the garage and it is flipping perishing! I have been concerned about it's abilities to cope with extremes. Do you know if it has a "best by" shelf life? I could go and look at the bottle, but as I said before the garage is flipping perishing ;-)

The info is all there on the Titebond website, but essentially the production date is a 10 digit code on the bottle : aymmddbat#
Where the y is the last digit of the year, "mm" represent the month and "dd" the day of the month.
Titebond original has a life expectancy of at least 2 years, but as long as the glue remains fluid and without a drastic change in appearance, then it is useable.

orangeena
02-03-2015, 05:38 AM
Thank you Paul

Pete Howlett
02-05-2015, 02:27 AM
It smells sour when it is off....

ThomD
02-06-2015, 06:03 PM
I use it elsewhere around the shop. For a while it was hard to get, but now I have several local suppliers. As of that, I get a new bottle every year. It is cheap in the smallest size, and in years when I go through a lot the larger sizes are crazy cheap. I don't want glue to ever be in question, so I get the fresh stuff. I really liked the LMII stuff I got, but it was very hard to keep around, and expensive.

Hluth
02-09-2015, 12:34 PM
I used to use LMI white "luthiers glue" before they stopped selling it last year (they said their supplier stopped offering it). Before that I used Lee Valley fast-set white glue until they discontinued it. I liked these glues because they were fast-setting and pleasant to use. I get my fingers into the glue a lot to control thickness, squeeze-out, etc., and since white glue's not too sticky, it wipes off your fingers easily. It also cleans up well next to joints before and after drying. So I switched to yellow glue and found that the clamping times were longer, it was sticky when spreading and wouldn't easily wipe off my fingers. Trying to clean up dried glue sometimes resulted it taking out the wood along with it. I now buy gallon jugs of the fast set white glue from an industrial supplier I found on line (didn't LMI know about them?). I know fast set white isn't as strong as yellow glue, but I'm not gluing on table legs, and haven't had a single issue with it's strength. The only place I don't use the white glue is for joining rosewood and cocobolo plates - I use CA for that, but hear that yellow glue works well too.

Jim Yates
02-09-2015, 03:03 PM
Hluth may have answered my question. I have always used yellow carpenter's glue for building/repairing instruments, but often see the term "Titebond" used. Is this just a specific brand of yellow carpenter's glue, or is there something unique about Titebond? The brand name on the bottle I have now is Home-Bond.
I can't seem to find the Titebond brand in Canada.

Pete Howlett
02-09-2015, 08:43 PM
Titebond is an Aliphatic resin type glue. Look up properties on their website as implied in Ken's introduction. It still is, as far as I know, the industry standard for those of us who don't need buckets of specialist industrial formulated glue...

Timbuck
02-10-2015, 05:57 AM
Fine advisor I am....Last night the temp dropped to 1 degree C and I left the Titebond in the workshop :uhoh:...At about noon today I glued a top on...when it had cured a couple of hours later I found that the glue squeeze out had turned a chalky white instead of the usual clear/opaque colour ...The bottle lable says don't use at temp below 50 F = 10 C, I checked the bottle temp 6 C :(...luckily the joint seems to be solid and the white can be sanded out ....So I'll see how the job goes....I could end up scrapping it. I hate the winter ! :wallbash:

**EDIT**
I just had another look at the spec: and it says this about it.

Chalk Temperature
When glue dries, the loss of water pulls the adhesive particles together with
enough force to form a continuous film. If the drying temperature is below a
critical point, water evaporation is not sufficient to pull the particles together,
leaving them in the joint. The dried film in the joint will appear whiter than
normal. This is known as "chalking" and the critical temperature is the "chalk
temperature." When chalking occurs, the glued joint loses strength and could fail.

Pete Howlett
02-10-2015, 07:17 AM
Scrap it Ken - it will save you embarrassment in the future....

Timbuck
02-10-2015, 07:33 AM
Scrap it Ken - it will save you embarrassment in the future....
I'll just take the top off , clean it up , and re glue. :)

Timbuck
02-11-2015, 01:51 AM
I warmed up the glue and the parts to aprox: 60 F on a second soprano, and glued it up with no problems this time. So lesson learned don't guess the temperature "Check it" ;)

Lapsteel
09-16-2015, 05:23 PM
Lee Valley sells Titebond in Canada.

FarmerBill
09-17-2015, 03:33 AM
I use a lot of Titebond, mostly #1 and #3 but they also make no-run no-drip fast set glue that is great too. I use it for trim because I can put a drop in a joint and hold it and it will set fast. I have it labeled as trim and tack but now they call it no-run no-drip, try it.
http://www.titebond.com/product.aspx?id=a1e18a48-c721-4b0b-8f63-259c477919e0

Bill

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
09-17-2015, 06:10 AM
Back up a minute. It's winter already?

chuck in ny
09-17-2015, 09:13 AM
all i use is titebond. it's versatile and good to use from 50* up. titebond 2 actually does a bang up job with gluing end grain quite remarkable in that respect. people rarely need the high water resistance and you can use the original as well.
it's best to use within a year but stored cool it will last for years.

Hikina
09-27-2015, 11:10 AM
New glue = cheap insurance. Don't ask how I know :(