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Hluth
02-06-2015, 06:34 AM
I just started a page on my website about building techniques, equipment, etc. It contains small, informal articles in pdf format. Click on "Luthiers" when you get there. I'll be adding to it as time allows.

Jerry Hoffmann
http://hoffmannlutherie.com/

Booli
02-06-2015, 09:54 AM
Thanks for sharing. I especially like the idea of the cantilevered saddle/bridge.

Some very creative, out-of-the-box thinking there.

Very nice :)

Matt Clara
02-06-2015, 03:42 PM
Really interesting work you have there. Thanks for sharing. Looking forward to seeing you around the forum more.

Habanera Hal
02-07-2015, 06:38 AM
Nicely done and very thought provoking. As an amateur trying to learn and understand luthier theory and design, I have a question regarding the cantilevered saddle/bridge design.

The strings on a traditional bridge/saddle "break" over the top edge of the saddle, which is where one would measure the scale length to the nut, and adjust compensation by filing the saddle's edge to move the break point if necessary. If I understand your drawing correctly, the strings pass through holes drilled in the saddle in a straight line, without exerting pressure over an edge (the pressure is exerted at the rear of the saddle where the knotted strings end). Where is the correct location then to measure scale? Do you measure at the knotted end behind the saddle? How does this design effect intonation? Wouldn't you get buzz from the strings vibrating as they pass through the holes?

Other than the adjustability of string height, what is gained by this design?. You certainly have more experience than I do, and I appreciate your sharing this. I'm just trying to understand how this concept is an improvement over traditional design.

Hluth
02-07-2015, 07:08 AM
Good question. Sometimes I get emails that start out with "I have a buzz". I thought if the player could easily make adjustments that would correct a problem just by raising the saddle a little, then they don't have to take it somewhere to be fixed or send it back to me. They can also adjust the action height for their individual playing style. This makes it a lot easier for players. The drawing didn't show it, but the holes are drilled at a 15 degree angle so they make contact at the bottom of the hole in front of the saddle. Compensation is made by setting the saddle at an angle. I also thought about making a thicker saddle, set it square, and step drill the holes based on how much compensation is needed for each string.

JustVince
02-07-2015, 12:41 PM
Thank you very much Jerry for taking the time to share these. -Vince

Hluth
02-09-2015, 10:19 AM
Last though: this idea isn’t something I’m going to incorporate into new ukuleles. It worked well, but it’s more trouble to make than a standard bridge/saddle, and making the required jigs/tooling isn’t high on my list. Its value for me is in taking an idea to reality to see what happens. You often learn something new when you do that, and it adds to your level of experience and knowledge of the instrument.

Booli
02-09-2015, 11:34 AM
Last though: this idea isn’t something I’m going to incorporate into new ukuleles. It worked well, but it’s more trouble to make than a standard bridge/saddle, and making the required jigs/tooling isn’t high on my list. Its value for me is in taking an idea to reality to see what happens. You often learn something new when you do that, and it adds to your level of experience and knowledge of the instrument.

While there's lots of value and importance in doing something 'the tradional way', there's also important value in testing what is possible. Sometimes things are done one way, just because nobody else thought to try something different, and other times they've tried it and it turned out to be a mistake, and that's why it's not more common.

Kudos to you for showing some fresh ideas. I like observing the creative thinking of others. :)