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View Full Version : Any Oahu Ukulele Factory/shops need a extra worker?



kanikapila
03-03-2009, 06:07 PM
Aloha, I see there's some ukulele factory/shop owners here so I thought I ask to see if you guys need an extra worker?

kanikapila
03-08-2009, 09:11 PM
haha 83 views no replies:shaka: not even a shop sweeper:eek:

dnewton2
03-09-2009, 01:22 AM
You might try to contact them directly instead of going to a ukulele forum where they may or may not be a member. Good luck with the job hunt.

Pete Howlett
03-09-2009, 03:12 AM
What do you expect? This is hardly an employment forum. I think I'd want anyone interested in my business to come and see me to present their case, not for me to go grovelling after them, resume unseen and little apparent commitment to the business. I'm sorry, uless this is an attempt at humour/irony, it is an inappropriate and lazy posting. You'd have to knock very hard on my door for even the workshop cat to give you a look in:nana:

herbsandspices
03-09-2009, 05:58 AM
You'd have to knock very hard on my door for even the workshop cat to give you a look in:nana:

He should probably send his resume to the cat, Pete - they're the real bosses. Obviously.

john

anomoly40
03-09-2009, 07:35 AM
I would get a job at a fast food place or a local restaurant and save enough money to go to a luthier school on the islands. Then ask where they'd reccomend to apprentice at. Bam, you could be a real help to a luthier.

cpatch
03-09-2009, 07:59 AM
What do you expect? This is hardly an employment forum. I think I'd want anyone interested in my business to come and see me to present their case, not for me to go grovelling after them, resume unseen and little apparent commitment to the business.
I'm with Pete...at the very least I'd expect someone looking for an unsolicited job to do some legwork, find out as much as they can about each company they're interested in, then send a resume (or at least a letter) and follow up with a phone call. (Not everyone has time to meet in person, so I'd leave that as a last resort.)

seeso
03-09-2009, 08:48 AM
Any hot chicks out there need a extra filipino guy?

Pete Howlett
03-09-2009, 09:09 AM
If someone came to my workshop without introduction looking for a job, I would not turn him/her away per se because they would have shown the first great strength in a builder/employee - initiative!

Next and very important point. It costs an awful lot of money to train someone and if they have anything about them, they will learn the trade and then set up on their own. So if a potential apprentice came to my door they would have to PAY ME to train them as in the old days. This then 'binds' the apprentice to the master and ensures that you, the employer are not out of pocket. This is known as an indentured apprenticeship.

Third, they would have to work long and hard hours on boring stuff. Not many people can do that and it would surely break most youngsters today who want everything instantly. A good friend of mine has just taken on a business partner - a retired banker. he knew nothing about building but was practical with his hands and was keen. ideal - Dave said "Do this" and he went away and did it - no questions, no agenda.

So young felow think long and hard - your current approach is lame:smileybounce:

cpatch
03-09-2009, 09:10 AM
Any hot chicks out there need a extra filipino guy?
Check here (SFW):

http://tinyurl.com/dxk6hq

Kaneohe til the end
03-09-2009, 09:50 AM
What do you expect? This is hardly an employment forum. I think I'd want anyone interested in my business to come and see me to present their case, not for me to go grovelling after them, resume unseen and little apparent commitment to the business. I'm sorry, uless this is an attempt at humour/irony, it is an inappropriate and lazy posting. You'd have to knock very hard on my door for even the workshop cat to give you a look in:nana:


If someone came to my workshop without introduction looking for a job, I would not turn him/her away per se because they would have shown the first great strength in a builder/employee - initiative!

Next and very important point. It costs an awful lot of money to train someone and if they have anything about them, they will learn the trade and then set up on their own. So if a potential apprentice came to my door they would have to PAY ME to train them as in the old days. This then 'binds' the apprentice to the master and ensures that you, the employer are not out of pocket. This is known as an indentured apprenticeship.

Third, they would have to work long and hard hours on boring stuff. Not many people can do that and it would surely break most youngsters today who want everything instantly. A good friend of mine has just taken on a business partner - a retired banker. he knew nothing about building but was practical with his hands and was keen. ideal - Dave said "Do this" and he went away and did it - no questions, no agenda.

So young felow think long and hard - your current approach is lame:smileybounce:

okay. i agree that this approach may not be altogether successful, but pete, you are being a jerk again. im sorry to say it. there are other ways to say it. ie, this may not be the best approach.
pete,
i work at KoAloha. ive only been there for about a month and a half, however i got to work there partially because of ukulele underground. i have no resume, no experience with woodworking, but someone found it in the kindness of their heart to hire a good for nothing stupid kid with weird hair in a time when i needed it most.
about the training stuff, i actually get paid to be trained, everyone at the shop is like that. we build, so we are not "out of pocket," we have fun, and we all bond together. the kind of comradery we have is unheard of anywhere else. we would do anything for each other. and about the long hours doing boring stuff, im only 18, i want to do things quickly, but i am not afraid to work. i am doing the same things over and over, but my hours are neither long, nor boring. in my opinion, if you find any aspect of building to be boring, maybe YOU should consider another path in life. as far as i know, there is nothing Paul doesnt love about building.

Kanikapila,
when i met you, you were a cool dude. keep trying, never give up, you will find something.

acabooe
03-09-2009, 02:15 PM
Here here kane'ohe.
Pete, I respect you as a builder, but there are nicer ways of getting your point across.

There are many different ways to be a luthier.
I went graduated from Hana Lima Ia, so I know how to build ( though not as well as the best I'll admit ). But, before I ever went to Hana Lima, I was working at G String Ukulele Co. ( no longer there though ), and I have nothing but good things to say about my time there.
The way that i got hired there was I just drove up one day, and asked if they were hiring. They asked if I had ever made an ukulele before, and I said yes and showed them ( it looked like crap, but what can you expect from a first time builder who had no teacher ).
Then I was told that I would start to work there the next day, and also to forget what I "thought" I knew because i was about to lear how to do it their way.
So, I did, and I learned alot. It was a very meaningful experience in my life.

By the way, from what I have heard, not many big production company bosses come on UU ( save Paul Okami *Howzit Brah*) so, I agree that it would be best to go to the companies website, or go there in person to apply for a job instead of here.
Bob

cpatch
03-09-2009, 02:29 PM
I went graduated from Hana Lima Ia, so I know how to build ( though not as well as the best I'll admit ). But, before I ever went to Hana Lima, I was working at G String Ukulele Co. ( no longer there though )
I think you just made Pete's point for him where he said:

"It costs an awful lot of money to train someone and if they have anything about them, they will learn the trade and then set up on their own."

kanikapila
03-09-2009, 02:41 PM
Wow I just typed that yesterday and see I knew you guys wanted to put your 2 cents in on this thanks for all the info. As for pete you grumpy old English man be nice with your words because all your hate and bad talk will reflect in your instruments "ALoha" is the word!!!!!!!!!!:shaka:

1014
03-09-2009, 05:16 PM
`auwe! Pete was giving straight dope. sure, he was blunt, but that's the real. nobody gets free rides. put in the work, young buck! you in o`ahu, right? hit the spots. face to face>message board posts any day. for reals, i don't think these small businesses, no matter much product they drop can rely on a message board post to give what few jobs they have (if they have any).

kaneohe, you lucked out, but did you just post a blanket "get job or wot?" or you did the dirty werks and you went after it. then good for you. you earned it and nobody's getting on your case.

kanikapila
03-09-2009, 06:52 PM
:shaka:
`auwe! Pete was giving straight dope. sure, he was blunt, but that's the real. nobody gets free rides. put in the work, young buck! you in o`ahu, right? hit the spots. face to face>message board posts any day. for reals, i don't think these small businesses, no matter much product they drop can rely on a message board post to give what few jobs they have (if they have any).

kaneohe, you lucked out, but did you just post a blanket "get job or wot?" or you did the dirty werks and you went after it. then good for you. you earned it and nobody's getting on your case.

Auwe kanaks I was juss messing around I have big respect for Pete as for all the builders and you who are you? do you build?or buy:shaka:

HumbleSounds
03-09-2009, 08:12 PM
IMHO

Its all relative. Yes, posting here for a job is not the most effective approach to acquiring a job/apprenticeship. In the opposing relative position, this shot in the dark might find a target audience. Crazier things have happened.

All the best to both sides of the debate. Don't get too hardened in your position or there is bound to be suffering.

Malama pono
:shaka:

Pete Howlett
03-09-2009, 10:41 PM
Now I have got your attention (and hey, thanks for the 'grumpy old man' tag - I'm working on it :shaka:) let me explain...

Building is a hard job that any old Jo/Jane will struggle to do well in. You have to have the right temperament to take the rough with the smooth and engage in often boring and repetative tasks (if you are a production company). The rewards come little and often most days and fill you with exhaustion and anxiety. It is often a very scary ride - ask anyone who starts rubbing out after days of careful preparation only to find a spec of dust in what was originally thought of as a perfect finish.

There are very few people out there in this climate who can afford the time and energy to take on an unskilled apprentice (one off builders who often need an apprentice but because of cash flow pressures just can't do it) and provide them with a rewarding experience. If you employ someone it is an 'investment' that you want to see a return on and in many cases, as an individual luthier you will not see because once your apprentice has your knowledge, they up and leave and set up in competition to you. I sort of did that but was in a business partnership where the other party was less than honest. I left and took the ukulele business because he never was involved in it so I squared that one with my conscience... It would spell disaster for me here in the UK if an apprentice did that to me (to my former business partner it had no impact) where the market itself is very small and where I spend at least 2 hours a day/night networking to get business and still often have to find 'other' work to pay the bills for 30% of my work week.

I honestly wish you well and hope you get to live your dream. If you do, recognise the sacrifice your employer is going to make and be sure to return the goodwill that has come your way. If you simply see it as an opportunity to set up on your own in short measure, be clear in your mind that this will be seen as a betrayel by someone who put a lot a trust in you. If you live in a small community as I suspect you might classify the Island of Oahu, this is going to go bad for you. Please read this advice in the spirit it is given - remember my opening comment? You have initiative - something all employers are looking for. Use it to take the advice given on this thread and with clear objectives and an honest heart get to do your thing :love:

And hey you guys, if I am feeling down or my brain is not in gear, I don't go into the workshop to build ukes - I do something else. Check out my website (http://uklectic.com) to see some of my latest offerings to the music world... I may come across as harsh but ask those who meet me what I'm really like :biglaugh:

Kaneohe til the end
03-09-2009, 10:52 PM
Now I have got your attention (and hey, thanks for the 'grumpy old man' tag - I'm working on it :shaka:) let me explain...

Building is a hard job that any old Jo/Jane will struggle to do well in. You have to have the right temperament to take the rough with the smooth and engage in often boring and repetative tasks (if you are a production company). The rewards come little and often most days and fill you with exhaustion and anxiety. It is often a very scary ride - ask anyone who starts rubbing out after days of careful preparation only to find a spec of dust in what was originally thought of as a perfect finish.

There are very few people out there in this climate who can afford the time and energy to take on an unskilled apprentice (one off builders who often need an apprentice but because of cash flow pressures just can't do it) and provide them with a rewarding experience. If you employ someone it is an 'investment' that you want to see a return on and in many cases, as an individual luthier you will not see because once your apprentice has your knowledge, they up and leave and set up in competition to you. I sort of did that but was in a business partnership where the other party was less than honest. I left and took the ukulele business because he never was involved in it so I squared that one with my conscience... It would spell disaster for me here in the UK if an apprentice did that to me (to my former business partner it had no impact) where the market itself is very small and where I spend at least 2 hours a day/night networking to get business and still often have to find 'other' work to pay the bills for 30% of my work week.

I honestly wish you well and hope you get to live your dream. If you do, recognise the sacrifice your employer is going to make and be sure to return the goodwill that has come your way. If you simply see it as an opportunity to set up on your own in short measure, be clear in your mind that this will be seen as a betrayel by someone who put a lot a trust in you. If you live in a small community as I suspect you might classify the Island of Oahu, this is going to go bad for you. Please read this advice in the spirit it is given - remember my opening comment? You have initiative - something all employers are looking for. Use it to take the advice given on this thread and with clear objectives and an honest heart get to do your thing :love:

And hey you guys, if I am feeling down or my brain is not in gear, I don't go into the workshop to build ukes - I do something else. Check out my website (http://uklectic.com) to see some of my latest offerings to the music world... I may come across as harsh but ask those who meet me what I'm really like :biglaugh:

thanks Pete. i think this is really the kind of approach everyone wanted to see., a professional builder giving advice on what they want in an employee. its just hard, ive been down the road Kanikapila is on now, pretty desperate for any job they can find. you really dont want to hear harsh words when looking for encouragement.

1014
03-10-2009, 04:16 AM
you really dont want to hear harsh words when looking for encouragement.

man, but some folks need to hear the reality of it. dream jobs aren't at every corner. trust, but you can't depend on luck or shots in the dark to bag your dinner, you gotta go work for it.

i dont think anyone wishes ill will on kanikapila. i had dreams too, and if he gets to live his, good on him. but in order to do so, he's gotta get his hands dirty.

btw, kanikapila, i'm primarily a buyer, though i'm considering on getting a kit and building my own (hence i visit this forum on the regular to cockroach all the mana`o from pete, etc.).