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Down Up Dick
02-16-2015, 05:08 AM
I have an Ohana mahogany 6 string. I can play it okay, but I have a devil of a time trying to barre the darned thing. The action at the nut seems low enough, but I have to fret pretty hard to keep it from thunking, buzzing, etc. the action at the bridge seems a bit high; I'll have to check it again.

Any helpful info would appreciated. :anyone: :old:

Down Up Dick
02-20-2015, 05:31 AM
Well, nobody must barre their 6-strings, or I'm being "shunned."

Again, I measured the string height at the nut and the 12th fret, and both seem correct. I can mostly barre my other Ukes without thunks, buzzes, etc (usually), but the sixer is not to be barred (heh heh).

It is equipped with GHS Blacks and an Aquila low red A string. So whasamatter? :old:

Lori
02-20-2015, 05:57 AM
The more strings you have to barre, the harder it gets. You just need more strength. I found when I tested an 8 string uke, my hand got fatiqued really fast. The six string was easier, but not as easy as 4 strings. If you can get lighter gauge strings for that uke, it might be easier. If you have any extra fingers free on a barre, they can be used to "help" out the barre. This is something that guitar players do a lot. Lower the action would help too, but you don't want to go too low or you will get buzzing. Usually 6 string ukes are good for strumming, so it depends on how hard you strum how low the action can be.

–Lori

Down Up Dick
02-20-2015, 06:08 AM
The more strings you have to barre, the harder it gets. You just need more strength. I found when I tested an 8 string uke, my hand got fatiqued really fast. The six string was easier, but not as easy as 4 strings. If you can get lighter gauge strings for that uke, it might be easier. If you have any extra fingers free on a barre, they can be used to "help" out the barre. This is something that guitar players do a lot. Lower the action would help too, but you don't want to go too low or you will get buzzing. Usually 6 string ukes are good for strumming, so it depends on how hard you strum how low the action can be.

–Lori

Thanks, Lori, I kinda thought that might be the problem (and answer), and, to think, I was gonna buy an 8 string! Well, my fingers are probably not gonna get any stronger. I'll just have to make do, I guess.

At least I'm not stuck with an 8-string--OR A TIPPLE! :old:

Kanaka916
02-20-2015, 09:32 AM
Own both 6 and 8, no problems using barre chords . . . there's only a few chords I use barring the at the first fret (C#maj7, Fm6/Dm7-5, A#7, etc.). Thumb placement so can get you max pressure when barring especially at the first fret.

molokinirum
02-23-2015, 06:30 AM
The more strings you have to barre, the harder it gets. You just need more strength. I found when I tested an 8 string uke, my hand got fatiqued really fast. The six string was easier, but not as easy as 4 strings. If you can get lighter gauge strings for that uke, it might be easier. If you have any extra fingers free on a barre, they can be used to "help" out the barre. This is something that guitar players do a lot. Lower the action would help too, but you don't want to go too low or you will get buzzing. Usually 6 string ukes are good for strumming, so it depends on how hard you strum how low the action can be.

–Lori

I Agree.....had similar issues when I got my 6 string, but with practie/playing it was no longer a problem. When I got my 8 string, there were no problems. So.....maybe a 8 string is in your future!!!!

Down Up Dick
02-23-2015, 06:48 AM
I Agree.....had similar issues when I got my 6 string, but with practie/playing it was no longer a problem. When I got my 8 string, there were no problems. So.....maybe a 8 string is in your future!!!!

I dunno. I've about decided that my UAS is done. I've sorta decided to carry on with what I've got until I'm good enough for a Clara or a Blackbird or a Luna (or some kinda) Steel. Right now, I seem to be making good progress.

We'll see . . . I got no where to go but up. :old:

molokinirum
02-24-2015, 06:10 AM
We'll see . . . I got no where to go but up. :old:

Enjoy the ride!!!

Down Up Dick
03-08-2015, 06:12 AM
Well, I changed the GHS blacks on my 6 string to Aquilas. When they settle in, I'll see if I can barre any better. I've got no where to go but up with it. The Aquilas look better to me anyway.

How do some of you peeps change strings all the time? It's a chore for me, and now I gotta do my concert. :old:

ubulele
03-08-2015, 07:58 AM
Do you have a stringwinder? Here's the one I use:
http://www.amazon.com/Planet-Waves-Winder-String-Cutter/dp/B0002E1G5C
A cross-slotted head for both large and small pegs. Well designed.

If you have a tie bridge, one thing you might consider is just knotting the strings and slipping them through the holes without looping them around in the fancy way. This is the way slot bridges work, though the knots (when small enough) slip into the bottom holes, so the tails can be clipped even with the body, keeping them out of the way. If you want to tie the tails together (in the way I find impractical but others love), you might have to knot the first string in a fancier way. But I rather enjoy doing the classic ties with the twists—to me, it's worth the extra time.

Maybe folks with a lot of ukes watch a lot of TV, and change strings and retune during the commercials.

Down Up Dick
03-08-2015, 09:39 AM
Well, I do it the "fancy" regular way, but I hold off changing them until I start feeling really guilty. There's another way where one loops the tail back through the knot, making a loop or half bow. I kinda like that one. The strings were tied off that way on my first banjolele when I got it.

But, no matter how I do it it's still a chore. But now, my concert is done, so I'm okay for a while. :old:

Down Up Dick
03-10-2015, 03:34 PM
I've been checking out barres on the 6 string, and I've found that I can do it some better with the new Aquilas. I still get some thunks and buzzes, but it really is an improvement.

Part of the problem seems to be the thickness of the neck. My left thumb gets very tired very quickly. I know that has nothing to do with the strings, but the Aquilas seem to be more flexible and easier to fret.

I guess, if I can't barre much better than I'm doin' now, I'll just plunka plunka through my songs. :old:

geetee
03-11-2015, 02:53 AM
If you brace the top edge of the lower bout of your ukulele against your body with your right arm, you can barre without using your left thumb on the neck at all. Just pull back with your left arm only hard enough to get the strings to touch the frets. Why squeeze when you don't have to?

Down Up Dick
03-11-2015, 03:09 AM
I already do that, geetee, but I'll work on it some more. Any port in a storm! :old: