PDA

View Full Version : Pocket Uke - also handy for tuning like violin (GDAE)



kissing
02-19-2015, 01:55 AM
So I have my heart set on learning to play the violin.

However, I know I have a long road ahead of me, and I am quite anxious about adapting to tuning in fifths (GDAE) as opposed to fourths (GCEA) that I am used to.

While my violin is on its way to me (will take about a week), I figured I would get some practice by tuning an ukulele like a violin.

However, I had some trouble on my Soprano, Concert and Tenor ukes.
The tensions of the strings would get too high.

And then I have a lightbulb flash in my head. I happen to have a Tom Pocket uke that has a shorter scale than soprano. I have it tuned to octave DGBE (one octave higher than baritone), with a linear low-D wound string.

This setup handles GDAE tuning quite well and I am digging it!

If you ever want an ukulele easily tunable to GDAE, get the pocket uke and whack on a reguar low-G string set!

kypfer
02-19-2015, 04:26 AM
So I have my heart set on learning to play the violin.

....

If you ever want an ukulele easily tunable to GDAE, get the pocket uke and whack on a reguar low-G string set!

Neat idea !!

I use the "proper" strings for the job, a set of Aquila 5th's on a soprano, but if there is a pocket uke to hand I can see this being a useful tip :)

Inksplosive AL
02-19-2015, 04:29 AM
Good luck I gave up soon after learning how to hold the bow.

Olarte
02-19-2015, 04:38 AM
Great what violin did you get?

Check out the violin tutor channel on YouTube she is awesome and has some basic videos.

Hope you can take some weekly lessons.

You'll be fine regarding the tuning it's the technique that is a bit tough to get used to.


Looking foward to future updates

deschutestrout
02-19-2015, 04:46 AM
And in case you didn't know ... that is mandolin tuning as well ... a BUNCH of new chord shapes to learn ;)

Olarte
02-19-2015, 06:49 AM
Except that you do not use chords on the violin, at most you do double stops. For the most part violin is played in single line melodies which makes it easier in that sense. But controlling the sound between the fretting and the bow, now that's like learning to ride a bicycle...




And in case you didn't know ... that is mandolin tuning as well ... a BUNCH of new chord shapes to learn ;)

deschutestrout
02-19-2015, 07:08 AM
Except that you do not use chords on the violin, at most you do double stops. For the most part violin is played in single line melodies which makes it easier in that sense. But controlling the sound between the fretting and the bow, now that's like learning to ride a bicycle...

I'm aware of that .... was just letting the original poster know that their pocket uke now shares mandolin tuning, and a new world of chords is available if they desire. They're not gonna be using a bow on the uke anyway.

Olarte
02-19-2015, 07:10 AM
Good point about the mandolin tuning, I can see Kissing, going for that as well... why not, all string instruments have a lot in common so playing a few different kinds is a lot of fun.

hucklelele
02-19-2015, 11:17 AM
If you like Scottish or Celtic music, here is a great tutorial with written music, note diagrams and online youtube presentations of each song, played several times- and once slowly-
http://scottishfiddlemusic.com/fiddle-tutorials/

I've been making great strides with reading, after a year and a half at fiddle from these tutorials- I printed the music and play along to the video- my technique is not very good, but the reading's coming along plus I'm getting a feel for licks that'll help with improv.

heres a couple of forums
Fiddle Hangout- http://www.fiddlehangout.com/forum/
The jukebox is a great source of member recordings

Violinist.com http://www.violinist.com/
more pure hardcore violinists

You may find your violin doesn't hold tune very well at first- it usually takes some working in of the pegs- get the string loose and twist the peg inward when you tighten-careful!- but after a week or two they usually start holding tune quite well. I like fine tuners on all the strings- it saves quite a bit of using the pegs and making more extreme exertions on the strings.

good luck- I'm having great fun with it myself, but it seems more difficult before the violin settles into tune
good luck

kissing
02-19-2015, 02:14 PM
Neat idea !!

I use the "proper" strings for the job, a set of Aquila 5th's on a soprano, but if there is a pocket uke to hand I can see this being a useful tip :)

Wow thanks for that, I did not know Aquila had a set for the job!

kissing
02-19-2015, 02:16 PM
Great what violin did you get?

Check out the violin tutor channel on YouTube she is awesome and has some basic videos.

Hope you can take some weekly lessons.

You'll be fine regarding the tuning it's the technique that is a bit tough to get used to.


Looking foward to future updates

I ended up getting an inexpensive Cecilio acoustic-electric.
I know, it's cheap as chips.. but I am kinda scratching the bottom of the barrel for cash availability, and it had favourable reviews:
http://www.kkmusicstore.com/cecilio-cvnae330-ebony-fitted-acoustic-electric-antique-varnish-violin-p-1259.html
I will invest in something better if I improve!


Thanks for the videos recommendation. I will be relying a lot on those tutorials!

kissing
02-19-2015, 02:18 PM
And in case you didn't know ... that is mandolin tuning as well ... a BUNCH of new chord shapes to learn ;)


Thanks! Been experimenting with mando chords too. They sound "interesting". I feel that the chords sound "brighter", perhaps due to the wider note spacings

kypfer
02-19-2015, 10:26 PM
If you like Scottish or Celtic music, here is a great tutorial with written music, note diagrams and online youtube presentations of each song, played several times- and once slowly-
http://scottishfiddlemusic.com/fiddle-tutorials/


Thanks for that link ... I'm always on the look out for tunes I don't know or arrangements that may be a little different :)