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Timbuck
02-19-2015, 07:13 AM
Has anyone tried one of these yet?

here on E-bay complete with video demo.
http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/12-Guitar-Fretboard-Router-Radiusing-Bit-/181665491167

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
02-19-2015, 07:33 AM
That looks pretty cool Ken. Looks like the easiest solution I've seen yet. Good thing he's got other sizes though as 12" seems a little radical for an uke.

mzuch
02-19-2015, 09:34 AM
Thanks, Ken. Just ordered the 16" version.

Timbuck
02-19-2015, 10:08 AM
I understand he can supply other radii cutters to order...I came across him on the Aus/Nz luthier forum.

resoman
02-19-2015, 11:03 AM
I'm trying to order one too. Thanks for the heads up on this Ken

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
02-19-2015, 06:12 PM
Where is the option to but the 16" bit? Or did you guys buy them all? ;0

sequoia
02-19-2015, 07:32 PM
Wow... This is a really interesting tool. Think of the other radiusing application possibilities: Head blocks, tail blocks, bracing... And custom too... Zip, zip, zip. No muss, no fuss... Thanks Timbuck, but has anyone tried it yet???

greenscoe
02-19-2015, 09:26 PM
The wood he used was thick and inflexible, I suspect it won't be as easy with a 4mm fretboard blank.

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
02-19-2015, 09:32 PM
The wood he used was thick and inflexible, I suspect it won't be as easy with a 4mm fretboard blank.

I'm assuming you'd double stick the fret board to a more substantial piece of wood.

Timbuck
02-19-2015, 10:23 PM
I'm assuming you'd double stick the fret board to a more substantial piece of wood.
Obvious ain't it Chuck.....;)

ksquine
02-20-2015, 06:51 AM
Nice....I sense a new addition to my router bit collection coming. It would do the heavy wood removal more accurately than my plane and use less sand paper to finish. Its amazing how fast oily rosewood can clog sandpaper.
You would DEFINITELY need to stick the fret board to a good heavy square block for support and safety.

mzuch
02-20-2015, 06:55 AM
I wonder if the fellow in Australia who sells these is scratching his head and wondering where the surge in orders came from.

Flyfish57
02-20-2015, 07:58 AM
I cut my fret slots first so I'd be afraid of tear-out. Still, it might be worth a try.

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
02-20-2015, 09:33 AM
I cut my fret slots first so I'd be afraid of tear-out. Still, it might be worth a try.

I would thing it could be done post slotting.
BTW, does anyone know if these are still available? They seem not to be. I couldn't find a way to order the 16"er anywhere.

Timbuck
02-20-2015, 10:19 AM
He says he's sold out of the 16" ones...So he'll have to make some more won't he ;)

resoman
02-20-2015, 12:22 PM
Chuck, I don't know how many he had but I did order one. Got a shipped email today. Mzuch, I'm bettin you are right. Probably a surge in orders for sure.

Pete Howlett
02-20-2015, 12:32 PM
I would have thought the Colllings solution adopted by Ben at MyaMoe would have been more up your street Chuck - They use a belt sander setup). If I was to use this I would set my router horizontally and mount the fingerboard on a block. Using his set-up you would need a substantial mounting block to stop 'rocking' at the end of the second cut. In all, this is a dangerous tool. Caveat emptor here for me and I will forgo the urge to own one because if I did I'd end up spending a day making a dedicated safe horizontal setup the occasional time when I want a radiused fingerboard. All the best with this and thanks again Ken for presenting us with something interesting :)

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
02-20-2015, 01:46 PM
I would have thought the Colllings solution adopted by Ben at MyaMoe would have been more up your street Chuck -

I don't even do radiused fretboards Pete as I see no advantage on an ukulele. Thanks for reminding me and saving me some money. :) It does look like a cool way to do it though. But honestly, it only takes a few minutes to hand sand a radiused board.

sequoia
02-20-2015, 07:20 PM
Using his set-up you would need a substantial mounting block to stop 'rocking' at the end of the second cut. In all, this is a dangerous tool. Caveat emptor here for me and I will forgo the urge to own one because if I did I'd end up spending a day making a dedicated safe horizontal setup the occasional time when I want a radiused fingerboard.

Food for thought and the statement that this could be a dangerous tool definitely got my attention Pete. I'm no engineer and I'm no mathematician, but the stresses on such an eccentric cutting bit must be immense... Still, potentially such a bit would have applications way beyond just radiused fingerboards, i.e. cauls, blocks, braces, etc. etc. How one could actually produce these these things safely though remains a question... Hmmmm...

sje-tools
02-20-2015, 09:56 PM
Hey all!

First up thanks to those who ordered! Those 2 have been shipped.

These were the first bits I had from the new factory once they had got the design sorted - that took them several attempts but we got there!

Yes in terms of the video it was just a lump and for fretboard the obvious idea is to attach the blank level to square piece of wood . . . I am actually intending to put up a video of the fretboard I will be radiusing for my son's 80% scale Les Paul I am currently making (making somewhat slowly at the moment!). :)


Food for thought and the statement that this could be a dangerous tool definitely got my attention Pete. I'm no engineer and I'm no mathematician, but the stresses on such an eccentric cutting bit must be immense... Still, potentially such a bit would have applications way beyond just radiused fingerboards, i.e. cauls, blocks, braces, etc. etc. How one could actually produce these these things safely though remains a question... Hmmmm...

Just to cover this - these bits are narrow width even at the widest point, which makes them very safe even to use in the router handheld. I use them in a router table with my Triton router at max speed. When you consider the size of some round over or bullnose bits these really are nothing in comparison to them. I've radiused fretboards by just using a piece of 2 x 4 pine which had been run through the thickness to true off the faces with the fretboard blank attached with some strong double sided tape.

In terms of using the bit on slotted blanks to be honest although I haven't tried it, I would personally think it would not be an issue, the blades are razor sharp and are super fine K01 carbide.

The sudden 16" orders surge was something of a surprise - previously the 10" and 12" were the popular ones with guitar makers! :) Also as said I can get produced any preferred Radius next order will be including some 9.5" and 7.25" for Tele makers - but on the other hand there is no reason why 18" or 20" could not be produced. But if you do want any funky radius let me know ASAP as I have to do the CAD design for the bits.

I am also intending to produce some binding bits - I had a .060" dedicated binding bit produced for my own use previously and I still use it! - so if you are also looking for binding bits without the eye watering StewMac price tag . . . also I will be get the 1/2" shafts as I believe the vast majority of folks use 1/2" routers anyway.

Cheers

Steve

Pete Howlett
02-20-2015, 10:30 PM
Great product. However I disagree with the safety assurance - in the hands of an amateur (and most who post here are) not used to router technology these are potentially dangerous. Note on the video the vibration through your table - with a cutter like this and a good 1/2" router there should be no vibration so I can only assume it is your table setup. It is more than just putting a cutter in a router: because power tools are easily accessible it doesn't mean they are safe! Using it as you do in the demo the large block of wood gives plenty of surface on which to stabilise it during infeed. Something you have now, thankfully clarified. On the matter of the video - tripod and edit... two essential considerations. I was getting seasick with the wobbly camera work :)

Slotted blanks? There would be little or no tearout. Tearout occurs with highly figured woods that have severe runout. Most fingerboard blanks are quartersawn and dense - ideal machining material. You are also removing small amounts.

All the best with sales. I'm only looking out for the uninformed enthusiasts who visit here... I don't want to dampen your parade and thoroughly endorse this product with the above caveats.

Drift: I've always thought the best and safest power tool solution to this is too use a hand power planer with ground irons. If you have access to tool making technology I would seriously consider this safer and more logical method...

sje-tools
02-20-2015, 10:52 PM
Great product. However I disagree with the safety assurance - in the hands of an amateur (and most who post here are) not used to router technology these are potentially dangerous. Note on the video the vibration through your table - with a cutter like this and a good 1/2" router there should be no vibration so I can only assume it is your table setup. It is more than just putting a cutter in a router: because power tools are easily accessible it doesn't mean they are safe! Using it as you do in the demo the large block of wood gives plenty of surface on which to stabilise it during infeed. Something you have now, thankfully clarified. On the matter of the video - tripod and edit... two essential considerations. I was getting seasick with the wobbly camera work :)

Slotted blanks? There would be little or no tearout. Tearout occurs with highly figured woods that have severe runout. Most fingerboard blanks are quartersawn and dense - ideal machining material. You are also removing small amounts.

All the best with sales. I'm only looking out for the uninformed enthusiasts who visit here... I don't want to dampen your parade and thoroughly endorse this product with the above caveats.

Drift: I've always thought the best and safest power tool solution to this is too use a hand power planer with ground irons. If you have access to tool making technology I would seriously consider this safer and more logical method...

Hey no worries - fully understand.

That vibration is was because I randomly automatically locked the router plunge height adjuster (probably because I was previously using my handheld plunge router) which isn't actually isn't needed on my router (Triton TRA001) when in a table as it not in plunge mode as the height plunge spring is removed and it uses it's built in height adjustment when mounted in the table.

Yeah I need to improve the videos - given I've done a whole load of photography through my life I do cringe somewhat when I see them (but limited time and all that!)

It's safe to say in any circumstances that routers are one of the most dangerous power tools in the shop and whatever work is being done with them needs to be thoroughly planned out before diving into it! :)

Michael N.
02-20-2015, 11:34 PM
I once had an accident with a Router, through my own complete ignorance it must be said. Scary. Things can go wrong very fast. I've pretty much avoided power tools ever since. Hand tools can be very dangerous too but after 35 years of working wood I only have one little scar on my finger to prove it. That was done right at the end of a 14 hour shift, midnight. There's a lesson there too.

sje-tools
02-21-2015, 12:27 AM
Lead time is date from the factory is 2nd week of March :)

buddhuu
02-21-2015, 12:47 AM
Welcome to UU, Steve. Always good to have another specialist aboard. :)

sje-tools
02-23-2015, 02:20 AM
Welcome to UU, Steve. Always good to have another specialist aboard. :)

Thanks! I've obviously spent far too long on Guitar forums! I never realised the Uke had such a following! :)

Also . . .
http://www.sje-tools.com

eBay is out the door!!! :p

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
02-23-2015, 07:24 AM
Thanks! I've obviously spent far too long on Guitar forums! I never realised the Uke had such a following! :)

Also . . .
http://www.sje-tools.com

eBay is out the door!!! :p

What's a guitar?

Beau Hannam Ukuleles
02-23-2015, 08:45 AM
What's a guitar?

Its the same as a uke, but twice the price

sje-tools
02-24-2015, 01:33 AM
Ok so for your viewing pleasure!


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g7iyOj_zY-k

Not only a real fretboard blank - but also a HD video without any camera shake! :)

sje-tools
02-24-2015, 10:47 PM
So here are few high quality pics so you can see the outcome clearer after I had removed the ends:

An nice accurate radius going on:
https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8614/16640680462_1f1cd72a85_b.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/rmtQxQ)

A nice smooth finish which probably needs attacking with around 400/600 grit to remove the minor machining marks:
https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8575/16455509739_9592437e37_b.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/r57MKa)

Cheers all

sje-tools
03-26-2015, 03:22 AM
Well . . . hey . . it's been a while!!!

Far, Far too long!

But the good news is that the bits are FINALLY en-route from the factory and I should have them around Tues/Wed next week.

Hell if I'd of known they were going to take as long this I would of ordered more of the 12", 9.5" radius bits! So I've already placed a new order and I haven't even received this order!! Word spread to Facebook and I've been inundated from an electric guitar builder group . . .

Anyway I did thankfully order sufficient 16" radius bits to cover all the initial queries and more . . . if you want to place your order now - you can via the website! :)

To those guys who have already placed their orders - a big thanks for your patience - and as soon as they are in my hands I'll check the bits over and get them straight into the mail! :)

Cheers

Steve

mzuch
03-26-2015, 03:42 AM
I got my 16" bit a few weeks ago and used it to make a guitar fretboard. Worked like a charm. Much faster and more precise than sanding with a radius block.

sje-tools
03-26-2015, 04:00 AM
I got my 16" bit a few weeks ago and used it to make a guitar fretboard. Worked like a charm. Much faster and more precise than sanding with a radius block.

Hey Mike - thanks for that - always nice to hear they work for other people and not just me!! :cool:

Hluth
03-26-2015, 07:47 AM
It doesn't look to me that you can do a compound radius with this setup, which I think is the proper way to do it. I have done a few radius fret boards as customer requests and start by making three facets on an already tapered board (equally divided on the wide end, and on the narrow end). Then use a scraper with an aggressive edge to form the radius, checking progress with templates for both ends and mid point. A belt sander with a compound radius attachment is the only way I have ever seen a compound radius made on a machine. Flat is fine with me and I hope radius fret boards don't catch on as the norm and force me to buy a new sander or modify my existing one.

Kevin Waldron
03-28-2015, 06:15 PM
Study this machine....... we have one and it works very well......compound radius are easy..... the idea could be adapted to a self built setup/unit for an existing sander...... ( we tried radius-ing fret boards with our CNC's and found it took a minimum of 8-10 minutes for a uke........ more like 20 minutes for a guitar if we wanted to do minimal sanding ..... decided there had to be something faster and we found this machine..... 3-4 minutes even for guitar........ for an example...... )

http://www.grizzly.com/products/Guitar-Fretboard-Radiusing-Sander/G0574

Blessings,

Kevin

sje-tools
03-30-2015, 09:23 PM
Just as a reply - of course a single router bit cannot do a compound radius - no one has ever suggested they do.

But anyway for those waiting:
https://scontent-lax.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xft1/t31.0-8/11115768_1381559942168545_2038462087304261271_o.jp g
https://scontent-lax.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xpa1/t31.0-8/10857105_1381560162168523_1010231467118326497_o.jp g

sje-tools
04-08-2015, 02:10 AM
A little bump - still got 16" bits in stock.

Cheers :)

sje-tools
04-22-2015, 12:57 PM
Morning all - just thought I'd let you guys know that I will soon have a few 18" radius bits in stock. I had a request from a guitar builder for one so I ordered a few extra.

Also I am now stocking thicknesser/jointer carbide inserts for Shelix cutter heads and the Hammer Slient-Power - which may interest some folks on here.

Cheers
Steve

www.sje-tools.com

:)