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View Full Version : Thin neck Tenor size ukuleles that were easiest to play?



King David
02-23-2015, 06:08 AM
Obviously you get to a point where you play long enough every week, your priorities start to change & you begin to just want something that is super easy to play for extended times. Despite having low action on your string setup, the neck makes a huge deal when it comes to the above. I'm aware that some players prefer thicker/chunkier necks and to them those are easier to play, so it's all subjective. But for the sake of this specific topic please indulge me by keeping discussion relative to those of us who prefer thinner neck profiles for easy chording. Out of all the tenor scale ukuleles you've played, which had the nicest SLIM neck and was EASIEST to play? If it played "like buttah" I want to hear about it, thanks.

WhenDogsSing
02-23-2015, 06:42 AM
Vintage Martin tenors have thin "fast" necks.

dsummers
02-23-2015, 06:50 AM
I would probably have to say Martin, Loprinzi, and Kiwaya in my opinion. Although I have only played soprano and concerts on the Loprinzi and Kiwaya which to me are thin and fast, I would think their tenors are the same neck profile.

katysax
02-23-2015, 06:57 AM
The two tenors that I played with the most "like buttah" necks were neither very thick nor thin - a Moore Bettah and a Ko'olau.

The tenors with the thinnest necks I've got experience with are Collings and Mya Moe and Martin. They can all play like buttah depending how they are set up an which strings you use.

Why do you think a very thin neck on a ukulele (we're not talking about guitar here) is helpful to playing fast?

dkcrown
02-23-2015, 07:03 AM
From my experience my Maui Music, Collings, and Mya Moe have had the thinnest necks. All are very easy to play.

King David
02-23-2015, 08:46 AM
At no point in OP was it expressed that this was about "playing fast", who cares about playing fast if you're just making inaccurate noise. This was about the easiest playing tenor scale ukulele with a thin/slim neck profile for extended lengths of play time every single week. As to the reason why anyone would prefer one style neck to the other it's apples to oranges(like I said it's always subjective). To me, in super short: thin neck profile = over a weeks time it's easier playing for extended sessions. Thanks for your contribution folks keep it coming.

Katy, about the Ko'olau you played: do you know if it was an older year model or a more modern one like the CS. I keep reading about how the Ko'olau's in the first several years of the 2000's had significantly different neck profiles.

I was afraid someone would say vintage Martin :drool: the hunt continues for one in very good condition...

janeray1940
02-23-2015, 08:52 AM
Vintage Martin tenors have thin "fast" necks.

Second this; in fact, these are the only tenors I've encountered that are comfortable for my very small hands to play.

Icelander53
02-23-2015, 10:10 AM
I have a Moku Spruce that has a super thin neck. I'm a fat neck guy so one day I'm going to re home that one.

kvehe
02-23-2015, 10:24 AM
Without question, my Takamine tenor is the easiest to play (and has a slim neck).

fongie
02-23-2015, 10:39 AM
Second this; in fact, these are the only tenors I've encountered that are comfortable for my very small hands to play.

I agree too. I just love my TK1, feels great

dsummers
02-23-2015, 11:07 AM
King Davd and katysax, please forgive my using the term "fast" as I realize we are not talking guitars, it was just an expression concerning ukes meaning easier chord changes, less fatigue, etc.

katysax
02-23-2015, 12:42 PM
At no point in OP was it expressed that this was about "playing fast", who cares about playing fast if you're just making inaccurate noise. This was about the easiest playing tenor scale ukulele with a thin/slim neck profile for extended lengths of play time every single week. As to the reason why anyone would prefer one style neck to the other it's apples to oranges(like I said it's always subjective). To me, in super short: thin neck profile = over a weeks time it's easier playing for extended sessions. Thanks for your contribution folks keep it coming.

Katy, about the Ko'olau you played: do you know if it was an older year model or a more modern one like the CS. I keep reading about how the Ko'olau's in the first several years of the 2000's had significantly different neck profiles.
.

I have one Ko'olau from 2006 and one from 2014. I prefer the earlier one. I don't think the neck is particularly thinner than the newer one - it is a flat vs. radius neck. The setup is superb. It is definitely a different neck profile, but it isn't thin.

I have one tenor with an extremely thin neck. It is a custom Leeward Lounge. I find that if the neck is - in my opinion - too thin it is fatiguing.

Nickie
02-23-2015, 12:44 PM
Sailor and Riptide

billten
02-23-2015, 02:08 PM
Try a Kinnard tenor, you won't want to put it down.

WhenDogsSing
02-24-2015, 04:19 AM
King Davd and katysax, please forgive my using the term "fast" as I realize we are not talking guitars, it was just an expression concerning ukes meaning easier chord changes, less fatigue, etc.

You have no reason to apologize. "Fast" is a commonly used word used to describe a comfortable playing neck regardless of what type instrument it is.

WCBarnes
02-24-2015, 05:17 AM
I do not know if it translates from concert to tenor size, but the neck on my KoAloha concert is amazing! Very thin and extremely easy to play.

rappsy
02-24-2015, 05:19 AM
Surprised noone mentioned KoAloah. I have the long neck concert and it is the thinnest neck I've ever played. My Big Island is a concert and it is really thin, but I don't know if the neck on the tenor is the same.