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Down Up Dick
03-16-2015, 07:23 AM
I visited one of my favorite music stores last week, and I was surprised to find that very few of the ukulele books had tabs.

Now, I understand that those who play chords don't need tabs once they learn the tab positions and, of course, reading the words isn't a problem, but how do nonmusic reading peeps sing or fingerpick the tunes? Don't they buy and use music books? If not, then how do they learn the tunes--by listening to them?

I do have a baritone book that has tabs, but I don't see how they're any easier to use than music on the staff. The thing that seems easier to read is the chords but not that much.

Anyway, how do you nonmusic reading fingerpickers do it? Do you even buy music books? Do you make-up your own tunes?

I'm just interested in what my fellow Ukers are doing. :old:

Icelander53
03-16-2015, 07:54 AM
Excellent query! I wonder too. I've been looking for some really really basic fingerpicking song books so I can start fingerpicking but I've had little luck. Most books have one or two little ditties and then move on to the more difficult usually too fast for my taste. I see the same thing online. Somewhere I found really simple versions of Amazing Grace and Red River Valley and they are great for beginning. I just wish I could find about a dozen more to keep things interesting until I'm ready to move on to more difficult material.

Teaching uke or anything well is to remember the difficulties one had at each stage of learning and to stay with the basics long enough to really establish a foundation from which to progress. Many "teachers" with high intelligence can't pull that off and so remain mediocre and produce mediocre students for the most part.

Camsuke
03-16-2015, 10:41 AM
Hi guys, there are plenty of ukulele tabs available online, hope this helps.
https://pdfminstrel.wordpress.com/2-standard-high-g-ukulele-pdfs/

Icelander53
03-16-2015, 10:50 AM
Thanks I like that they are graded according to difficulty.

ralphk
03-16-2015, 11:42 AM
Mike Lynch has some ebooks with tab, arranged for only the RH thumb. This means one does not have any need to have the thumb and a finger coordinated. It should make the transition to fingerpicking easier than other arrangements.

Camsuke
03-16-2015, 12:36 PM
Here's another great site; http://home.arcor.de/crazydawg/tabs.html

katysax
03-16-2015, 01:14 PM
Most people listen to the songs to get the tune. I do read music and have little problem picking out just the melody to hear how the song goes using a uke, but I keep a keyboard handy and if I'm using something like the Daily Ukulele I will often pick out the notes on the keyboard. I use a Casio battery powered toy. It works fine for that purpose.

Down Up Dick
03-16-2015, 01:31 PM
Most people listen to the songs to get the tune. I do read music and have little problem picking out just the melody to hear how the song goes using a uke, but I keep a keyboard handy and if I'm using something like the Daily Ukulele I will often pick out the notes on the keyboard. I use a Casio battery powered toy. It works fine for that purpose.

Yeah, that's what I do too, if I'm having trouble sight reading, but I usually use a flute or tin whistle--sometimes my keyboard. Most of the time I can sight-sing the melody.

I guess most people use the Internet, but a lot of sites that I've seen don't have the melody and/or words. :old:

Nickie
03-16-2015, 01:38 PM
I just bought a book of Irish Songs for Ukulele that is full of tabs, lyrics, and chords. The tabs are single notes only, for thumbing, and there's some really good stuff in there, like Danny Boy, for instance.

Down Up Dick
03-16-2015, 02:13 PM
I just bought a book of Irish Songs for Ukulele that is full of tabs, lyrics, and chords. The tabs are single notes only, for thumbing, and there's some really good stuff in there, like Danny Boy, for instance.

Ha! Irish! Good for you! I played two of my Irish flutes yesterday, and I'll play some more tomorrow. We'll also have corned beef and cabbage and a bit of Guiness. It's one of our favorite holidays, and we're not even Irish. I'm part Scotch-Irish, but my wife is German.

Does your new book have the melodies too? Danny Boy's a great tune. I play lots of Celtic music. :old:

itsme
03-16-2015, 02:40 PM
DuD, did you miss brimmer's thread where he gave us a free ebook of Irish fingerpicking tabs?

http://forum.ukuleleunderground.com/showthread.php?105658-Celtic-Fingerstyle-Uke-Ebook

Down Up Dick
03-16-2015, 03:35 PM
DuD, did you miss brimmer's thread where he gave us a free ebook of Irish fingerpicking tabs?

http://forum.ukuleleunderground.com/showthread.php?105658-Celtic-Fingerstyle-Uke-Ebook

Thanks a lot, itsme, but I have lots and lots of Celtic music books. I play it all the time. :old:

pritch
03-16-2015, 03:56 PM
Previously I have seen the advice that before learning to play a song you should listen to it repeatedly until you are completely familiar with it. I sometimes buy songs from iTunes to this end, but there is a huge amount on YouTube and Spotify for free.

Unless you get their premium version, Spotify will only let you play in shuffle mode which doesn't help much. There is though apparently nothing to stop you creating a playlist with multiple copies of the same recording as was recently done by a player of my acquaintance who wanted to learn a new song.

Steve in Kent
03-16-2015, 10:36 PM
Ha! Irish! Good for you! I played two of my Irish flutes yesterday, and I'll play some more tomorrow. We'll also have corned beef and cabbage and a bit of Guiness. It's one of our favorite holidays, and we're not even Irish. I'm part Scotch-Irish, but my wife is German.

Does your new book have the melodies too? Danny Boy's a great tune. I play lots of Celtic music. :old:

Oooh, never call a "Scot", "Scotch", (cos that's whisky), or you'll get a black eye, or worse :D

Down Up Dick
03-17-2015, 02:51 AM
Oooh, never call a "Scot", "Scotch", (cos that's whisky), or you'll get a black eye, or worse :D

I've seen "Scotch" linked to "Irish" many many times; the term is widespread, and it's used to name those from Northern Ireland who are of Scottish descent. There's also a lot of very tasty Scottish beer called "Scotch Ale", etc. over here.

Anyway, thanks for the warning. I'll think of it next time I have a wee taste of the product --Cheers! :old:

Steve in Kent
03-17-2015, 07:00 AM
I've seen "Scotch" linked to "Irish" many many times; the term is widespread, and it's used to name those from Northern Ireland who are of Scottish descent. There's also a lot of very tasty Scottish beer called "Scotch Ale", etc. over here.

Anyway, thanks for the warning. I'll think of it next time I have a wee taste of the product --Cheers! :old:

I was once told in "no uncertain terms" by a Scot who said scotch was for all things not human that originated in Scotland :) Didn't make that mistake again.