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greenscoe
03-31-2015, 01:22 AM
A near neighbour has shown a keen interest in my uke making over the last year. She started to learn to play a concert uke last Autumn and, with very small hands, thought a tenor too large.

10 days ago she asked if I'd make her a soprano with some 'nice looking' wood. I showed her some spalted beech I spotted on Ebay last year and told her I'd think it over: I've only made one standard soprano and like to make 'whatever takes my fancy'. The result of my pondering is this pineaffle (British spelling) with 13.5" scale length.

The neck is in cherry, the soundboard in one piece western red cedar, and it has 2 full length fans with a maple bridge patch between them. The purfling is London plane tree and it has walnut binding/end graft with Grover machines. I've cut the tapered dovetail neck joint with jigs and a router. The soundboard is finished with spray can polyurethane (it's cold and damp here) and the remainder is done in Tru oil.

I've spent 35/40 hour over an 8 day period making this. I like the way it's turned out. I've strung it with Living Waters and first impressions are favourable. Its loud and clear and has lots of sustain. I reckon it benefits from the larger soundboard and, as I hoped, is not bright. I rarely handle sopranos but I find this easy to play.

My neighbour is currently away. I'll gladly add this to my growing collection if, on her return, she doesn't like it!

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ksquine
03-31-2015, 04:03 AM
Nice looking uke. Wish you were my neighbor

KoaDependent
03-31-2015, 04:16 AM
Pineaffle = pine-f-hole?

greenscoe
03-31-2015, 05:29 AM
Pineaffle = pine-f-hole?

Correct-it's a play on the word 'pineapple'. A pineapple shaped uke with f holes:as far as I'm aware the word is entirely my own creation, unless someone thinks otherwise.

kypfer
03-31-2015, 06:17 AM
The result of my pondering is this pineaffle (British spelling) with 13.5" scale length.


That, sir, is a very pretty instrument :)

greenscoe
04-06-2015, 01:02 AM
Well, I enjoyed playing this for a few days but now its gone. I guess I'll just have to add it to the list of things to make again.....more archtops, more bowl backs , more tenor pineapples, more sopranos................................did someone say uke making can become addictive?

fretie
04-07-2015, 04:04 PM
Beautiful instrument!

How is your neigbour liking it?

greenscoe
04-08-2015, 01:45 AM
Beautiful instrument!

How is your neigbour liking it?

She is very pleased with it, both the appearance and the way it sounds. She is surprised at how much easier it is to play than her existing concert. That's partly because its a soprano and partly because of the way I made and set it up.

fretie
04-08-2015, 05:49 AM
+1

That's great to hear, greenscoe!

pbagley
04-08-2015, 06:06 AM
Very nicely done. Too bad you're not in Kent. I could visit my cousin and be your neighbor for a week or two...

On a more serious note :
- Did you happen to photograph the bracing before you glued the soundboard to the sides?
- Was there a reason not to use tru-oil on the soundboard?

Thanks!

greenscoe
04-08-2015, 06:53 AM
Very nicely done. Too bad you're not in Kent. I could visit my cousin and be your neighbor for a week or two...

On a more serious note :
- Did you happen to photograph the bracing before you glued the soundboard to the sides?
- Was there a reason not to use tru-oil on the soundboard?

Thanks!

Photo of bracing attached. The shading around the f holes is CA adhesive: my token effort at reinforcing this area! Since I don't build anything to plans, I use my judgement on what will work. I thought the bracing was probably too heavy but knew that I could tune the soundboard by sanding once the box was assembled. This is what I did, sanding until I liked the response I got striking the board.

I find cedar and spruce mark very easily when treated with True oil. Nitro cellulose lacquer gives a hard finish which would protect the soundboard. I'm a hobby maker: my workshop is a glass conservatory and I use the kitchen for finishing. In Summer I can use basic spray equipment to spray lacquer outside and did so last year on a couple of instruments. I can't do this in Winter when its cold and damp so my solution to producing a harder soundboard surface is to use spray can polyurethane under the kitchen extractor fan.


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pbagley
04-08-2015, 06:34 PM
Thank you. I appreciate the photos. Very nice.

I'm just about to finish a bass guitar body with a Norway spruce carved top. I plan to use tru-oil. Maybe that's a mistake. The tru-oil brought out the grain in the black maple neck really nicely. I'm hoping it does well with the cherry body back and sides as well.