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Strumdaddy
04-04-2015, 05:13 PM
I was strumming my uke and supervising to my son as he washed his teeth last night. He has a little joke when he finishes of turning off the light and closing the door on me while I'm still playing. This time I stayed there for a while and kept playing in the total dark - it was great!
I couldn't check where my left hand fingers were, just had to trust and go by the sound - even when leaping up to 5th or 7th position. My hand knows where to go - despite my thinking I need to constantly monitor it. And I could really focus on the sound I was making
Try it sometime - you'll like it (or just close your eyes if you don't have a cheeky child and a dark bathroom handy)
Let us know your thoughts.

Laouik
04-04-2015, 05:23 PM
It's funny what random things occur that helps build confidence. Never know when it'll hit!

Aldrine Guerrero
04-04-2015, 05:39 PM
This is a great way to build confidence for playing the uke. You have to trust your instincts and be confident on your own ability. Just feel it and try to play as calm and collected as possible. By doing this, you allow your fingers to do what they should.

Play some familiar songs and then mix it up by changing the inversions of the chords, it's a lot of fun :D

Laouik
04-04-2015, 05:54 PM
This is a great way to build confidence for playing the uke. You have to trust your instincts and be confident on your own ability. Just feel it and try to play as calm and collected as possible. By doing this, you allow your fingers to do what they should.

Play some familiar songs and then mix it up by changing the inversions of the chords, it's a lot of fun :D

And it seems to me that in the dark, without visual queues and checks, a different part of the brain is used. It's down to muscle memory, and a a purely tactile approach. I sometimes play while looking away on purpose until my fingers jump to the right place (much to my neighbour's dismay).

TheCraftedCow
04-05-2015, 06:03 AM
Uhhh, just closing yer eyes does the very same thing, so you can do it any time , any where. It will not, however build the memory between a father and a son which will be shared for the rest of their lives.

Laouik
04-05-2015, 06:15 AM
Uhhh, just closing yer eyes does the very same thing, so you can do it any time , any where. It will not, however build the memory between a father and a son which will be shared for the rest of their lives.

The main point I understood from his post was the effect of no longer seeing in the playing, and the surprise it brought. Unfortunately not everyone has a child, and this being a ukulele forum... I totally see your point. Not sure why the need for a correction.

bonesigh
04-05-2015, 09:13 AM
It's quite relaxing and lovely to sit with your eyes closed and play (:

Olarte
04-05-2015, 09:22 AM
It's ancool thing to try.

When I was learning some of the harder pieces on classical guitar I would do that on occasion.

It's actually different doing it in a dark room with your eyes open. Than closing your eyes.

Playing Bach like this was amazing. And without thinking my hands would just go to the right places all over the large classical guitar fretboard.


It is certainly one way to make sure you know a piece or song inside out.

It helps me to visualize the piece by the phrases of the music.
I can also visualize what the fingers are doing.
And it heightens your kinetic sense.

Ukejenny
04-05-2015, 10:28 AM
Remove one sense, and the others quicken. How cool.

Hippie Dribble
04-05-2015, 11:13 AM
Uhhh, just closing yer eyes does the very same thing, so you can do it any time , any where. It will not, however build the memory between a father and a son which will be shared for the rest of their lives.

:stop: I think this is a very unfair comment. What you felt the need to moralise was actually acknowledged by strumdaddy in his initial post. An excellent thread about stretching one's playing boundaries and building confidence that should be an encouragement to all of us.

I didn't realise you knew him or the relationship he has with his son.

Ukuleleblues
04-05-2015, 02:34 PM
It makes you actually listen to what you are playing.

Strumdaddy
04-05-2015, 06:36 PM
It's actually different doing it in a dark room with your eyes open. Than closing your eyes.

.......and without thinking my hands would just go to the right places ......

And it heightens your kinetic sense.

Yes, yes, yes!! That's the sort of thing I'm getting.
And - on another level - it reminds me of how much we can do (in all areas of our lives) without - or despite, constant monitoring and processing. Having faith without always seeking proof.
Do we over-manage ourselves? Try too hard? Is there a flow that we would be a part of anyway? ....The Zen of uke....
"When you can play the C#m7 chord without looking, Grasshopper, you may leave the Temple"

igorthebarbarian
04-05-2015, 07:19 PM
also try the black Flea/black Fluke - they have black plastic frets, and with Worth Brown's, it's kind of the same thing!... seriously though, I think this is a big step for checking to see if you really "know it"

stevepetergal
04-06-2015, 03:24 AM
No matter how much I practice when I'm alone, my wife says I'm still no good in the dark.

TheCraftedCow
04-06-2015, 07:04 AM
:stop: I think this is a very unfair comment. What you felt the need to moralise was actually acknowledged by strumdaddy in his initial post. An excellent thread about stretching one's playing boundaries and building confidence that should be an encouragement to all of us.

I didn't realise you knew him or the relationship he has with his son.
It seems obvious you have never read the book "The Making of a Memory". There are things which are done that form a bond between people spouse to spouse-friend to friend-parent to child. Those memories stay far longer than what was the original intent or discovered benefit. My comment was that in years to come they will remember the times of turning out the light and it will bring back happy memories. You can't get that extra benefit from just closing your eyes. It was not moralizing or meant to be derogatory. He's also built a bond with his son which just closing the eyes does not do. Time will show that to be so. There will be no "Remember when..... by just closing one's eyes.

Rllink
04-06-2015, 07:11 AM
:stop: I think this is a very unfair comment. What you felt the need to moralise was actually acknowledged by strumdaddy in his initial post. An excellent thread about stretching one's playing boundaries and building confidence that should be an encouragement to all of us.

I didn't realise you knew him or the relationship he has with his son.I think that you misread what he was saying.

barefootgypsy
04-06-2015, 08:29 AM
No matter how much I practice when I'm alone, my wife says I'm still no good in the dark.Fabulous! Howling with laughter.....

barefootgypsy
04-06-2015, 08:39 AM
Kinaesthetic learning, learning by touch, is recognised as being a very powerful way of learning. Interesting article here. (http://www.jcu.edu.au/wiledpack/modules/fsl/JCU_090460.html). On holiday, we watched a mandolin orchestra. At the very beginning, two 8 year old children came on stage, who hadn't been learning long. They both played their piece while looking out to the audience the whole time, never once looked at their hands - they had obviously been taught to play by feel all the time! It's a great tool, but hard to make yourself do it. The bedtime game is a great idea!

ricdoug
04-06-2015, 09:00 AM
I do not read The Crafted Crow's post as negative. I read it as acknowledging Strumdaddy's bonding moments, while pointing out that a similar experience can be achieved by closing one's eyes.

Strumdaddy, that's cute that your son enjoys the routine :)

Its also cool that it was a confidence building moment for you. Ric

Hippie Dribble
04-06-2015, 11:36 AM
It seems obvious you have never read the book "The Making of a Memory". There are things which are done that form a bond between people spouse to spouse-friend to friend-parent to child. Those memories stay far longer than what was the original intent or discovered benefit. My comment was that in years to come they will remember the times of turning out the light and it will bring back happy memories. You can't get that extra benefit from just closing your eyes. It was not moralizing or meant to be derogatory. He's also built a bond with his son which just closing the eyes does not do. Time will show that to be so. There will be no "Remember when..... by just closing one's eyes.
My apologies coolcow. No I have not read that book and yes, I clearly misunderstood your remark.