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soupking
04-15-2015, 04:17 PM
I've been UAS's punk for over five years now. Many an instrument I've sold here, without barely touching, only to lose 40 to 50% of the original retail price; but hey, that's my fault. Along the way, I've held a chosen few that take on the workload of actual play time. This Maui Music soprano is one of them. I must confess that I recently sold this one. The prospective "buyer" cried foul upon witnessing the play wear in the flesh.

I had described the ukulele as "well-played," and as such, showing minor play wear. The pre-arranged three-day trial period was abruptly cut short, as said play wear rendered the transaction a "deal breaker."

In any event, the uke is back in my possession. I'm no damn good as a player, as you'll soon see, but hell if I don't have fun at it. I somehow worked into my head that sopranos oughtn't have geared tuners. In fact, prior to purchasing, two years ago, I was on the fence due to that very notion. Ah, who cares about tuners anyway? They certainly work better than frictions, for one thing.

Anyway, the thread here is a beckoning for anyone else brave enough to show their well-loved ukuleles. It's been said here, that luthiers who receive their ukes back for repair, sans play wear, get teary eyed at the notion that there's no love. Well, here's my Maui Music plain Jane soprano. It's such an excellent ukulele. I've had many, but this one is forever here to stay. There's not a single fault, and also, Peter is the man. I'm gonna start saving for a 2016 35-year anniversary edition Maui Music soprano. I'm so glad this one came back because it was meant to be.


http://youtu.be/DdnRvkhmBx8

Hippie Dribble
04-15-2015, 04:57 PM
I prefer a uke with play wear personally. You know it's been loved, appreciated and put to the use it was designed for. It never ceases to amaze me how many prospective buyers on a second hand marketplace quibble over mild playwear. It's happened to me a crazy number of times and I really have to bite my tongue. You offer it for sale with a mad discount, in near to new condition and they make a biggie that's it aint mint. Seriously? THEN BUY A NEW ONE!!!!!! My fave ukes are the ones with heaps of mojo, wear and tear, that have developed a nice patina. Will post some pics later. But my own perspective (if it aint already clear as crystal) is that one should not baby an instrument for the sake of keeping it looking a million bucks -unless you specifically bought it to sell on - in which case, WTF??? Buy em, play em, love em otherwise your enjoyment of the instrument is gonna be severely compromised and what's the point of that.

soupking
04-15-2015, 05:02 PM
Preach, Brother Jon! You best include a video of any banged up beauties, too! :cool:

jer
04-15-2015, 05:23 PM
That's a nice sounding uke, and nice looking too. I think the wear makes it look cooler. Plus, a uke played that much has had time to really open up sound-wise.

Camsuke
04-15-2015, 05:40 PM
"Well-played" has never really worried me. This little beauty has had more come backs than Dame Nellie Melba and it's still going strong!

NewKid
04-15-2015, 05:45 PM
I'm working hard to wear my ukes out! I have a 1920's Martin 2M that has scratches, dings, and a small repaired crack on the top. It has the mojo and is as loud as a tenor but with that old-timey tone. It's the model for all my other ukes.

That Maui Music soprano is a beauty! I'm glad it came back to you.

PereBourik
04-15-2015, 06:03 PM
It's not wear. It's love.

UkerDanno
04-15-2015, 06:34 PM
Well, this one has been loved for over 80 years! And still sounds amazing...
78510

Strumdaddy
04-15-2015, 07:20 PM
*WARNING - this post contains graphic descriptions of ukulele abuse that may offend sensitive ukers*

I have a much loved Black Bear concert that has traveled with me for thousands of kilometers, bringing humour and song to elderly people - from wealthy urban areas to drought ravaged outback missions, through freezing nights, and 49 degree days (Celsius, that is 120 Fahrenheit) the little Bear has rung out her sweet sound.
I did strike a few problems with it at one stage though... the neck developed a bend that was slowly raising the action until it got difficult to play (nothing to do with Mr Helman's build quality which is superb) It was the only instrument I had and I was in the middle of nowhere, so I heated the neck on the car radiator and bent it back using a luggage strap and some clever leverage involving the bumper bar - it worked! But then it eventually went too far the other way, so I repeated the process a few weeks later, but this time there was a gut wrenching SNAP... some grain run-out had given way. It wasn't all the way through so I squirted in some PVA glue, closed it up and went on my merry way.
She's played fine ever since, and - whilst I wouldn't recommend you try this sort of repair at home, the cracked neck and various knocks and scratches don't stop her from playing like a bell - loud and proud and sweet, they just give her a story to tell.

7851578516

PhilUSAFRet
04-16-2015, 03:47 AM
Would have depended on price for me. An easy fix with some wipe-on poly and a quick polish if it bothered me. That's a huge sounding little sucker.

Icelander53
04-16-2015, 04:33 AM
I've been UAS's punk for over five years now. Many an instrument I've sold here, without barely touching, only to lose 40 to 50% of the original retail price; but hey, that's my fault. Along the way, I've held a chosen few that take on the workload of actual play time. This Maui Music soprano is one of them. I must confess that I recently sold this one. The prospective "buyer" cried foul upon witnessing the play wear in the flesh.

I had described the ukulele as "well-played," and as such, showing minor play wear. The pre-arranged three-day trial period was abruptly cut short, as said play wear rendered the transaction a "deal breaker."

In any event, the uke is back in my possession. I'm no damn good as a player, as you'll soon see, but hell if I don't have fun at it. I somehow worked into my head that sopranos oughtn't have geared tuners. In fact, prior to purchasing, two years ago, I was on the fence due to that very notion. Ah, who cares about tuners anyway? They certainly work better than frictions, for one thing.

Anyway, the thread here is a beckoning for anyone else brave enough to show their well-loved ukuleles. It's been said here, that luthiers who receive their ukes back for repair, sans play wear, get teary eyed at the notion that there's no love. Well, here's my Maui Music plain Jane soprano. It's such an excellent ukulele. I've had many, but this one is forever here to stay. There's not a single fault, and also, Peter is the man. I'm gonna start saving for a 2016 35-year anniversary edition Maui Music soprano. I'm so glad this one came back because it was meant to be.


http://youtu.be/DdnRvkhmBx8

I'd say you're looking at one of the UAS issues where looks can be even more important than sound. For myself I like a well worn uke and I'm working on it. I've found it takes a hell of a lot of effort to wear down a uke. Good for you and I like your playing.

greenie44
04-16-2015, 05:04 AM
I'm with the playing crew here. I recently noticed a fair amount of play wear on my highest end uke. A moment of sadness, as I realized that my UAS-enabling falsehood of an investment was not really true. But I do love this uke, so I guess I will just have to keep it.

I did buy the uke used, so I never expected it to be pristine, and I probably won't really lose that much anyways, since I got a good deal on it. But I wonder what sort of market there is for higher end ukes that have been well played, at any price.

Payoffs in happiness far outweigh payoffs in currency.

SteveZ
04-16-2015, 05:23 AM
for some a musical instrument is to be pristine forever. However, that's like the kid who gets a toy as a birthday gift and then told not to take it out if the box to play with it, because the value of the toy as a collectible will depreciate with use.

To me (and what do I know!) musical instruments are "consumables" destined for eventual wear-out due to loving but exuberant use. This is especially true with portable wooden instruments which endure heat, cold, high/low/no humidity, sweat, picks and whatever else makes contact with an instrument over time.

Folk who buy used instruments (usually discounted by xx%) and expect/demand showroom condition can never be pleased and usually seem to be looking for an after-the-sale haggle to further reduce the price. While I occasionally sell an instrument, I much prefer to trade. Trade partners usually are more realistic as to used instrument condition.

fretie
04-16-2015, 05:33 AM
I don't mind some wear on a used instrument that I'm contemplating buying but I like the seller to be very clear about the wear,the degree and specific area on the uke, before he/she packages it up and mails it out to me. Prefer no surprises, except maybe good ones, when the uke arrives.

pbagley
04-16-2015, 09:35 AM
A lot of good points in this thread so far. In my humble opinion player's wear on an instrument is expected. Some guitar manufactures will add some wear and tear to your new instrument for a fee, and these "road worn" classics seem to be selling or they would have been discontinued long ago. This is like being the cool kid that buys new jeans with holes in them. I think it's a little silly - if my jeans look worn or have a hole in them it's because I have worn them a lot. It's good honest wear earned through my own efforts.

For the things I like good honest wear is OK. I have instruments that started with a satin finish on the back of the neck that is now quite polished. I had two that went back to the manufacturer for warranty work that were instead replaced and I had to start over. And I have instruments with dings and scratches that I put there. I hate that I had a careless moment, but the wear and tear is all the result of good honest use and proof that I like the instrument. I wouldn't have it any other way.

Ukejenny
04-16-2015, 11:44 AM
Think of Willie Nelson's guitar, trigger. Talk about wear!!! And that instrument is beautiful. Legendary.

Neither of my instruments look as though they have a past, but I like that look. Maybe after a few more decades of playing...

erivel
04-16-2015, 03:34 PM
I call it mojo.

peterbright
04-16-2015, 04:02 PM
If they had those photos, I do not understand how they could complain.