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pluck
04-27-2015, 01:03 PM
I recently got Jumpin Jim's Daily Ukulele. I've been enjoying it quite a lot but I noticed that when a song calls out for a D7 Jim illustrates a D7 without a D (2020) which is actually a Gbdim or F#dim. In many cases when I substitute in a proper D7 (2223) I find it actually sounds better his way. So, why does he call it a D7 if it's not really a D7? I understand that with 9th and 11th chords you've got to drop the root but that's not the case with 7th chords and a D7 isn't that hard to play.

I assume he has a reason for doing this but to me he should just call the chord what it is. I'm confused.

Tootler
04-27-2015, 01:13 PM
You're right, played on it's own, 2020 is F#dim. However, if you are accompanying another instrument or someone singing and that part (usually the melody) has a D at the same place, then the sum of what is being played is a D7 chord.

I use 2020 all the time as it's easy to finger and it suits the sound I'm after. Most of the time it works just fine. Sometimes however, you find that you really need to play a proper D7 (2223). Just let your ears guide you

deschutestrout
04-27-2015, 01:15 PM
That shape is one I often use for D7, it adds the 7th (open C) but I agree it's odd that there isn't a D to be found ... oddity of a 4 stringed instrument I guess :-) The other shape I use is 2023 ...

janeray1940
04-27-2015, 01:18 PM
2020 is often referred to as "Hawaiian D7" (at least that's how I learned it). It some contexts it sounds great, but more often than not I find using the barre D7 sounds even better.

I'm guessing the Beloff songbooks are aimed at the beginner market so he's opted to use the easiest chords when possible - but this is just a guess; I've only glanced through his books and that was my impression.

stevepetergal
04-27-2015, 05:21 PM
2020 is often referred to as "Hawaiian D7" (at least that's how I learned it). It some contexts it sounds great, but more often than not I find using the barre D7 sounds even better.

Yes, janeray is exactly right. I've always been puzzled by the Hawaiian D7. There's no D in the chord. (I'm sure this is why I find the sound of it dissatisfying)

Mxyzptik
04-27-2015, 05:33 PM
I use both versions depending on the song. When I play my arrangement of How great thou art I use both in different spots of the song.

k0k0peli
04-27-2015, 05:35 PM
I bought my Kala KA-6 and the Daily Ukulele book last week. I returned the book the next day -- too many of the vintage songs are incomplete, such as choruses without intros or verses. I want the ENTIRE song, dammit! As for the 2020 / D7 chord: I come from a half-century of git-picking and I still think of that pattern as A7. On a 'uke, 2020 is *most* of a D7 chord and can generally be used as such -- doesn't matter so much what it is technically. The low A on the KA-6 makes 2223 more of a D13 anyway. My advice: for most casual playing, especially when we're concerned with playing a usable chord at the right time, we needn't obsess over the exact name. If it *feels* like D7, that's good enough IMHO.

lizziep
04-27-2015, 05:39 PM
I love rootless chords, so I usually seek them out!

Ukejenny
04-27-2015, 06:16 PM
I love 2020 Hawaiian D7 and I like to ride my pinky off and on the A string as well, going between 2020 and 2023, back and forth. Makes a simple thing sound fancy.

pluck
04-27-2015, 06:23 PM
Thanks for all the replies. It is helpful, somewhat. So next time I mention a Hawaiian Am7 y'all will know I'm talking about a Cmaj.

Tootler
04-28-2015, 10:59 AM
Yes, janeray is exactly right. I've always been puzzled by the Hawaiian D7. There's no D in the chord. (I'm sure this is why I find the sound of it dissatisfying)

If you mainly play instrumentals then that makes sense but if you are a singer, as I said earlier, it's quite possible the D is in the melody. As I sing, I quite often use it and it often works fine and sounds OK

cdkrugjr
04-28-2015, 06:28 PM
"Hawaiian D7" for a lot of music theoretical and historical reasons. The most important one is that it contains the same "tritone" (dim5 or aug4) as the D7 chord (c-f#).

It's also why the common jazz "tritone substitution" works (Ab7-G7)--Ab7 contains the same tritone, though it's spelled differently (c-gb), and why a pretty common way to play "D7b9" on Uke is just to play Adim7 (a-c-eb-f#) which has the same tritone, giving the "Dominant 7" sound, the 3rd which dictates quality (m or M), as well as the b9.

Glen Ross calls these things "Chameleon Chords" though the formal name is "enharmonic chords" which is just a fancier way of saying the same thing. Google is your friend for more detail.

McX
04-28-2015, 08:31 PM
I love 2020 Hawaiian D7 and I like to ride my pinky off and on the A string as well, going between 2020 and 2023, back and forth. Makes a simple thing sound fancy.

I'll second this. And if you really must have a D in your D7, you can throw in a 2025. Sounds really nice strung cuatro (gCEa) as that 5 is a true root D.

igorthebarbarian
04-28-2015, 09:25 PM
Thanks everyone for the other suggestions on 2023 and 2025, along with my lazy-favorite 2020. Have to try them out!



I'll second this. And if you really must have a D in your D7, you can throw in a 2025. Sounds really nice strung cuatro (gCEa) as that 5 is a true root D.

ralphk
04-29-2015, 02:00 AM
I frequently decide on using the 0202 or the 2223 depending on the following chord. Do you want the tone to go up, or down, leading to the next chord?

Ralph

flailingfingers
04-29-2015, 04:14 AM
Using the Hawaiian D7 allows me to slide the chord up and down which creates a cool effect at times when singing as I repeat some words while doing it. Example: the line "Nobody knows you" slide "Nobody knows you when you're down and out". Add some little bluesy notes fade and you be cool.

Ukuleleblues
04-30-2015, 01:10 AM
A 5655 is a nice version and lends itself to being walked down.