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View Full Version : how have your uke needs/wants changed over time?



janeray1940
05-03-2015, 07:45 AM
I thought this might be an interesting topic after seeing it touched on in a couple other threads about ordering customs. It's been sort of addressed elsewhere before in a more general "if you knew then what you know now" way, but my intention for this thread is to address specifics. So - here's mine :)

When I first started playing, I was REALLY into the vintage thing. I have a lifelong history of driving vintage cars, wearing vintage clothing, and listening to music made before I was born by people who in most cases had passed on long ago. So of course I thought I wanted a vintage uke.

Turned out my one experience with a vintage uke could be summed up by the phrase HIGH MAINTENANCE. The tuners slipped constantly and my ear wasn't good enough to adjust this on the fly.

Fairly early on I discovered two other things: George Harrison's love of Kamakas, and John King's campanella playing. I bought a few Kamakas and really enjoyed them, especially for my attempts at playing campanella, but always thought I wanted something one-of-a-kind and vintage-y.

So I had a custom made to *sound* like a vintage uke - in this case, a mahogany soprano based on the specs and tonal qualities of a Martin 3M. Everything about it was beautiful except - as I got to know it, I realized it wasn't the right sound for what I liked to play most. And more importantly, I realized I wasn't the kind of person who truly cared about having a one-of-a-kind *anything* - I just want simple, practical things that do what I need them to do.

All of that to say, it turned out that what I thought I wanted/needed - vintage, unique, etc. - was not at all my reality, and what I ended up loving was nearly the opposite - very plain, stock, as new as possible (I don't even like buying used if I can help it).

Anyone else have a story to tell?

(And, side note - as I've gotten older, this has turned out to apply to my non-uke life as well! I no longer drive vintage cars, I dress really generically and barely even own any vintage clothing any more, but I do still love the old music - even though I've become much more open to the new. So, it's been a life lesson.)

ohmless
05-03-2015, 08:09 AM
thought I would love a solid wood uke since everyone said it was the best. Well, not for people who don't want to constantly worry about cracking, humidity and such. Good thing I have a laminate beater and a plastic soprano. They taught me that worry free is for me. While I was saving for an expensive to me solid body acoustic a deal came up on ebay for a barely played Risa electric soprano. Now I am saving up for an amp and thinking of getting pedals. Now instead of replacing my laminate and plastic ukes I have one that complements the ones I already had.

Ukejenny
05-03-2015, 08:19 AM
My perspective is one of someone who hasn't shopped a whole lot and who hasn't spent a lot of money on several ukuleles. When I started out, I got the best I thought I could afford and ended up with some very nice midline ukuleles. I was constantly looking at ukuleles with a lot of bling and pretty woods. That is what I thought I would end up getting. As my playing got better, I realized I wanted a certain kind of sound and a certain kind of playability. Looks aren't that important to me. I want something that will be versatile enough to do everything I want to do now, and what I want to do later, as I become a better player.

So, I've gone, from in the beginning, from something that looks great, to something that plays great and will hold up to strenuous playing and conditions. I don't want tons of maintenance. I don't want something that is delicate outside. But, I do want something that will sound and play great. Luckily, I haven't ordered expensive, gorgeous customs that I can't take and keep outside for a while. But, I sure do love looking at what the folks here purchase.

tbeltrans
05-03-2015, 08:30 AM
Though I have mentioned this in other threads, I will post it here again. When I got interested in the ukulele, I decide to do it differently than I had with the guitar (my primary instrument). Instead of buying inexpensive and periodically selling/trading up, I went for what I wanted right away. I still have my original two ukuleles and no desire for more. I also did get a Guitalele (Kanilea), and decided again to do it once and do it "right" (for me). For me, this approach seems to have worked. I know that there are others who enjoy "flipping" ukuleles, so my approach is certainly not right for everybody (or even most...).

A caveat to this is that, having played guitar for a long time, I have a sense of what makes for a decent instrument. I was able (thanks to google), to get a sense fairly quickly of ukulele brands were a reasonably "safe" buy due to widespread acceptance of those brands. My choices were limited to those ukuleles locally available at the time, because I really feel strongly for myself about "try before you buy". I was fortunate that, at that time, the ukuleles that seemed well suited for what I wanted, were available locally. I have not seen these two models around here since, though other models of those same brands are periodically. I got the Guitalele on Craigs List, and that went smoothly too. I can honestly say that I feel very fortunate because when I read about all the choices I did not yet know about at the time, would have rendered me indecisive, which can be a really frustrating experience - always wondering if there is something better that you could have chosen. I see that feeling expressed here in various posts, in various ways.

The way things worked out for me, I can just relax and enjoy what I have without worrying about what might have been, had I chosen something else. What I have is clearly more than good enough for me, and will be for a very long time. My ukuleles are good enough that there really isn't an "upgrade" to move up to. That was why I went the direction I did - do it once, do it right, and forget about it.

Tony

plunker
05-03-2015, 08:42 AM
Bought my first uke a little over a year ago. Bought is for $ 29.00 at Leonardo's in Micanopi Fla. I picked it up and started playing around on it, my wife urged me to it, finally I did. I When I got home, my wife bought me a month of lessons. Thats when I bought my KA-T which is still my main uke. My son said he would learn and play with me but not that silly little thing. So I got him a Baritone, which I like for the sound and I play it occasionally he backed out, which is ok since I got the Baritone.. Then I saw a LUte -uke. I like period music, especially baroque so I thought it would be cool. IT fights with my stomach for space, I the tone is not what I was told, at least I don't think so. I expected it to sound, I guess "richer" than the Kala. Now I have the bug (see my uke upgrade suggestions thread).

kohanmike
05-03-2015, 08:56 AM
thought I would love a solid body uke...

For a moment I thought you were talking about an actual "solid body" but then realized what you meant was solid wood uke.

I succumb to looks most times. In the first year of playing I accumulated about 14 ukes because I liked their looks. Recently I culled them down to my four favorites, sound and playability first, looks second. But now that I've added bass uke to my playing, I'm back to buying for looks, but find that I like the feel and sound of poly string basses (of which I have four) rather than steel string (I have two). So eventually sound and feel win over looks.

DownUpDave
05-03-2015, 08:59 AM
I thought a hawaiian made uke from gorgeous curly koa would be my "grail uke". Turns out I prefer tenors with spruce or cedar tops and a resonant guitar like sound. Was all about re-entrant now I love low G equally. I was totally against plugging in, colouring the sound and looping, a uke should just sound like a uke.......on the beach all natural and such. I just purchased a LR Baggs pre amp, will have pick ups installed in at least two of my ukes and have been researching amps.

I still enjoy the simplicity of grabbing a uke, strumming and singing but I have come to appreciate how versatile this instrument can be.

ohmless
05-03-2015, 09:02 AM
doh! thanks for catching by gaffe
kelly


For a moment I thought you were talking about an actual "solid body" but then realized what you meant was solid wood uke.

I succumb to looks most times. In the first year of playing I accumulated about 14 ukes because i liked their looks. Recently I culled them down to my four favorites, sound and playability first, looks second. But now that I've added bass uke to my playing, I'm back to buying for looks, but find that I like the feel and sound of poly string basses (of which I have four) rather than steel string (I have two). So eventually sound a feel win over looks.

Steveperrywriter
05-03-2015, 10:02 AM
I dunno if two years playing is enough time to offer any kind of knowledgeable reply, but I did noodle with classical guitars for a long while, and some of that experience seemed to have carried over into ukery. Kind of gave me a running start in at least some areas.

My philosophy has been to get the best instruments I can afford, those that are going to be limited by my ability to play them, and not the other way around. And, for me, there is a whole package aspect, the look, the feel, the sound. Not about cost, though I believe that high-quality ought to be paid for.

Lotta years ago, I had an MG Midget. Loved that car, but it was a vexing ride. Sometimes it started only if the wind was from the West and it felt like it, and as often as not, it ran on a whim, bolstered by prayer or curses. Not what youíd call a dependable automobile.

When Mazda came out with the Miata, it was touted as an MG that actually ran, and eventually, once the kids were gone and I didnít need the passenger room, my wife got me the Miata.

An arrest-me-red convertible, and I loved that car. Every time I drove it, I grinned. Wasnít raining or below freezing, the top was down. Had it for twelve years, but eventually needed a little more room, there now being grandchildren. (So I got a Mini Cooper, which has a little ó very little ó more room. Go figure.)

I have a guitar like that, made by a premier luthier who didnít charge nearly as much as he should when I bought it, and who still doesnít charge as much as he could. Ten years on, and every time I open its case, I still grin at that baby.

Once I got past my entry-level ukulele and knew that I was going to stay with ukes, I went looking for instruments that would offer the whole package. Bought and sold some along the way, now I have four. All tenors, my choice; all low-G, all made by excellent one-person-shop luthiers. Two new, two used. I am most pleased with each of these. Some have bling, some donít, but each is beautiful in its own way.

Maybe down the line Iíll string one up reentrant. And maybe another uke will pop up that I canít pass by, but because of my guitar experience, I came to ukes with preferences already going down a certain road, and so perhaps I didnít change those as much as I might have otherwise. I wouldn't be shocked to learn that folks coming from another instrument might have a different view than somebody for whom the uke is their first musical experience.

Icelander53
05-03-2015, 11:27 AM
Really mine have not changed that much. I still would like to play and own just about every uke out there. I own ukes that are fairly expensive but that would never stop me from spending $250 on some uke I think is worth a shot.

However, once you play a really decent sounding uke it's harder to play the others except as a lark. Personally I think there are plenty of inexpensive ukes that may come very close to a much more expensive one. They may even sound and play better to your ears.

All that I just said above might sound like experience. That would be correct.

wayfarer75
05-03-2015, 01:48 PM
I thought I would never consider playing a tenor, and now I'm planning to buy one next.

Rllink
05-03-2015, 02:10 PM
I got my first ukulele a little over a year ago. I don't know how to answer your question, because I don't know what entails needs and wants. But I never had any specific needs or wants. Mine were fairly general in nature. I wanted to get a ukulele, play around with it for a year or so, see if it was going to be fun, then if I liked it, get a better one. That is about it. So nothing has changed in that respect. As far as the future, I want to play around with my ukulele some more, and get a little better, so that is pretty general as well. I guess though, I thought about it while I am writing this, I decided some where along the line that I would like to busk, and when I started, I didn't even know that busking was called busking, so that has changed. That has gotten me to look at amps, microphones, and stuff like that. So there is something.

Fred Ukestone
05-03-2015, 02:10 PM
I started out wanting only two ukulele sizes. A long neck soprano and a tenor. I bought the best I could afford at the time. I don't need anything else at this stage. Although Jon's review of the piccolo uke has triggered a slight UAS reaction (well ...moderate reaction... no,no I lie......... slightly strong reaction....where's the phone book, I need help )

turtledrum
05-03-2015, 02:58 PM
On June 28th of last year I ordered my first uke, an impulse buy by a guitar player who was always curious about the instrument. Since then I've discovered a passion I never could have imagined. I own a number of ukuleles and suppose that a few more will come my way. If I've changed during this rather short period of time, it's in this:I find myself focusing on how a uke I'm attracted to would fit "in the family."

In "Siddhartha" Hermann Hesse spoke of the difference between being a finder and a seeker. Seekers often miss seeing what lies before them because they are searching. Finders are open to what appears. As my ukulele journey has unfolded, I've found myself learning more from the ukes I have than becoming infatuated with the ones I don't.

A shift from having to being.

NewKid
05-03-2015, 03:21 PM
I started out wanting one of each size, then just tenors, now mainly tenors but one bari, one concert, and one soprano as well. Eventually, a concert banjo uke.

janeray1940
05-03-2015, 03:21 PM
Thanks all for the replies thus far, they have been really interesting to read. I found the comments from those who had experience with other string instruments to be particularly of interest - you were lucky in that you had some idea of what you wanted in a uke, based on experience rather than just what you had read or been told by others!

Andy Chen
05-03-2015, 04:20 PM
I was a guitar player who started on the uke for fun. So I just bought something on the cheaper end.

Now, I am more of a ukulele player than a guitar player and I want the best sounding ukes and the good-looking ones too.

NatalieS
05-03-2015, 04:26 PM
Everything has changed for me over the years. I started out playing only soprano and gravitating towards a more vintage sound. Now I prefer tenors and a more modern, very Hawaiian koa tone. I think it's natural for taste to change over time, just as it does with the music you listen to, fashion, and other areas of life. It's what keeps life interesting!

tbeltrans
05-03-2015, 04:26 PM
I was a guitar player who started on the uke for fun. So I just bought something on the cheaper end.

Now, I am more of a ukulele player than a guitar player and I want the best sounding ukes and the good-looking ones too.

I already wrote my story earlier in this thread, but wanted to comment on this post. It is strange but true what Andy says here. I am finding the ukulele - just plain FUN. None of the musical "baggage". Stuff just works on the ukulele, so you can focus on the music and not the idiosyncrasies of the fretboard.

Tony

janeray1940
05-03-2015, 04:45 PM
Everything has changed for me over the years. I started out playing only soprano and gravitating towards a more vintage sound. Now I prefer tenors and a more modern, very Hawaiian koa tone. I think it's natural for taste to change over time, just as it does with the music you listen to, fashion, and other areas of life. It's what keeps life interesting!

Thanks for your comment Natalie! I think I've followed your uke journey for almost as long as I've been playing. Funny that you and I both started at a similar place and are now again in a similar place (substitute concert for tenor and there you go!).

And I do agree, it's what keeps life interesting. Which is why I've learned to never say never - even though I'm presently satisfied with the three ukes I own and love, I can't say I'm "done" because who knows what the future may bring :)

janeray1940
05-03-2015, 04:46 PM
I'm gravitating to cutaways.

It just occurred to me that I've actually never played a uke with a cutaway, even though I play up the neck quite a bit. For me, it's the 14-fret join rather than the standard 12 that I'm now gravitating toward - I almost feel it's an absolute necessity in any new uke that I may consider.

PereBourik
05-03-2015, 06:00 PM
I've learned that I like quality: a couple of Martins; a couple of Hawaii-built koa ukes. I like ukes that are a little different: pineapple KoAloha, Clara, and Flea. I want a custom that is drop-dead freak-show gorgeous.

I started with a preference for concerts. Now I'm getting tenors. I tried low G and will play it for some things but really favor re-entrant tuning.

Things which haven't changed:
1) I still go shopping every time my skills get stuck.
2) I want all the ukuleles.

Andy Chen
05-03-2015, 06:10 PM
I already wrote my story earlier in this thread, but wanted to comment on this post. It is strange but true what Andy says here. I am finding the ukulele - just plain FUN. None of the musical "baggage". Stuff just works on the ukulele, so you can focus on the music and not the idiosyncrasies of the fretboard.

Tony

My feelings, exactly. Plus, I can form most chords on the tenor uke without breaking any fingers.

katysax
05-03-2015, 06:24 PM
My first uke was a really nice Koaloha Soprano I got in 1998 in Waikiki. I still have it. My second uke was a Fluke I got about 2 years later. I was very happy with just those two ukes for several years. I was primarily a guitar and saxophone player. Uke was something I got out to go play with people who were playing ukes. I would strum and mess around with adapting fingerpicking from the guitar.

It was about 3 years ago after my jazz band broke up and I had not been playing sax that i started itching to get out and play with people. I started going to various uke groups and bought a laminate Islander Concert. Then a used Kanilea Concert. Then a Koaloha Tenor and I started wavering between concert and tenor, settling on the concert as my favorite. The only vintage I wanted was a Vita Uke - a friend had one and I fell in love with it. My search for a Vita led me to an estate sale where I picked up a couple of really nice customs and some vintage instruments (but no Vita). The Customs were two Kawikas. I didn't know what I had but I knew I had something special and my eyes were opened. I wanted custom but it took a while to figure out. Now I am at a point where I really like to play tenor but I've been having problems with my left hand and playing concert is not as stressful to my tendons and joints.

Along this journey my feelings have changed. I thought that all I cared about was how the uke sounded and felt. But as I got better ukes I found that I cared more and more about things like different woods and adornments. I also don't necessarily want to take my most expensive ukes out. So I started to reconsider some less expensive ukes.
.
So for me the major evolutions have been developing an appreciation for customs, deciding that I like some bling. I keep wavering back and forth between concert and tenor due to issues with my hand. I've also discovered over time that a pickup isn't necessary in every uke but its nice to have in the ones I take out. I like strap buttons. I like the look and feel of a slotted headstock a lot more than I thought at first. And I recently learned that an arm bevel can make a big difference in comfort with a large tenor.

As my playing improves I use the frets up high on the fretboard a lot more. I have only one uke with a cutaway. So far its nice but not that important but I really want a uke that is playable down to the 15th fret and that rings clearly on the high frets. Maybe I'll get to where i feel that a cutaway is necessary.

I like shopping for ukes. I like trying lots of ukes.

Phluffy the Destroyer
05-03-2015, 08:00 PM
My main use for the uke is to accompany myself when I sing. When I first started playing sopranos were fine. I could strum along and sing and everything worked out just fine. In all honestly, I didn't ever foresee myself needing anything bigger or more expensive because I was more interested in improving my strumming and chord knowledge. Also... I lucked out because my first uke was a cheap $40 soprano that actually sounds really awesome, so I didn't even need a "better" instrument as much as I needed to figure out what to do with the one I had.

The point where I outgrew it as my primary instrument was when I started making Youtube videos. Suddenly, friends and family started wanting to hear me play in person, and there just wasn't enough volume out of it without the recording setup on my computer. So I moved up to a concert.

I played the concert for a while, until I started getting good enough to do more than just strum. My daughter loves a song that has a real simple finger picking pattern to it, and I decided to learn how to play it so she could sing along. In the process, something went "ding" in my brain and I realized I could sing along with that pattern. I tried out a tenor one day and decided I would move up to that because it was a little easier to pick on the tenor than it was on the concert.

Then I started into arpeggios and figured out how to sing along to those. I've been playing around with other finger picking patterns lately, trying to find more I can sing along to. So, I picked up a baritone and put GCEA strings so I can learn different patterns more easily. Lately though, I've found several guitar players that I can jam with fairly regularly and my direction has changed just a bit. Since I mostly play rhythm, I find they enjoy playing with me because they mostly like to play lead. Oddly enough.... none of them I've met yet can sing while they play...

Anyway, I'm thinking I may need to go electric now though, because even next to an acoustic guitar the uke is just drowned out.

hollisdwyer
05-04-2015, 12:20 AM
Ever since I acquired my first luthier built uke, second hand, I knew I would never buy a mass produced one again. The difference in sound, playability and looks reminded me, as with guitars that I've owned in the past, that, quality is worth every cent you pay to get it.
To afford my collection I sold off a number of instruments I was no longer playing. Now a days I regularly play all the ukes I own and even travel with them (one at a time) so I can enjoy them no matter where I am.
If possible I would love to continue my collection with more custom with different sound qualities, woods and looks. I really like variety and I really love the process of working with a creative crafts person in creating an object of beauty.

k0k0peli
05-04-2015, 04:35 AM
My 'uke needs+desires are merely a subset of my changing instrument gestalt. I'm pretty happy with my guitars (and don't have room for more); I want to play a fifths-tuned instrument larger than a mandolin; and I want to explore more multi-string 'ukes and different tunings.

My first 'uke sat neglected for years -- an ancient banjo-uke I got cheap off eBay. Until I joined UU a couple weeks ago I didn't really know how (or care) to set it up right. Now it's a funky joy but I wouldn't mind a more modern banjolele.

We stopped in Paracho, Michoacan (Mexico's leading luthier center) a few years ago. I tried every guitar in town but only had room in the car to bring home a cuatro-menor, like a fat mandolin with four 3-steel-string courses. I tune it DGBD (low D) and play slack-key and bottleneck. Imagine a 12-string tenor 'uke with a shimmering sound. Yes, it's 'uke-like, sort of.

I got my first playable 'uke less than two years ago. My wife insisted; it's light, bright, and inexpensive, heh heh. That Kohala soprano isn't really mellow; when my wife heard me play the Kala KA-6 six-string tenor with its low A string, she bought it for me. Just over two weeks, and it's my constant companion now. And it leads me to wonder about other multi-string possibilities.

So, within the next couple days, I'm scheduled to receive a Rogue mandolin and another Kohala soprano, both cheap. The Kohala will be a test-bed; I'll try stringing it in thirds, in fifths, and maybe add a string to give it a charango quality. (I've wanted a charango for years but my priorities are changing.) I'll restring the mandolin into a sort of 8-string 'uke, and experiment with strings doubled in unison, in octaves, in other intervals, etc.

I've not yet touched a luthier 'uke so I don't know if I'll be swayed. My course right now is aimed toward an octave mandolin or mandola or cittern (ooh, that takes money!) but if a magic 'uke sings to me (and to my wife) then it could happen, eh? Meanwhile, I'll keep playing with stringings and tunings and new techniques. And we'll be traveling, so whatever happens will necessarily be very portable.

actadh
05-04-2015, 04:57 PM
I find that I am concentrating on just two ukuleles.

Good environmental conditions = I play the Opio soprano.

Less than good environmental conditions = I play the OXK soprano.

JustinJ
05-05-2015, 07:22 AM
I've learned that is more fun to play ukulele than look for a new one. When I first started playing, I found myself wanting a Ko'olau. The thoughts of a new ukulele took my attention. I had a beautiful Pono MTD and honestly I would not have known the difference in the two instruments. I did not have enough experience playing a ukulele. I decided to learn some more difficult songs and then buy a Ko'olau. After learning the songs and getting a little better on the uke, I no longer had the desire for a new uke.

It's been a year of playing now for me. I've made good progress. I've been playing low G ukulele and found myself desiring to learn other styles of music with a high G. I wanted to be able to play both styles of music everyday. So I went on the search for a new ukulele. I had some good experiences and bad experiences. I talked to many interesting people and learned a lot about instruments.

So now, I have two ukuleles and am satisfied. Although the searching and listening for a second uke was long and difficult. I knew what I wanted, which is good. But finding it is another story.

Lastly, I find the ukulele an enchanting instrument. There something very visceral about playing it. Guitar never brought me much joy. I enjoy piano but the ukulele is my favorite. The ukulele is an honest instrument. It's simple but profound at the same time. It's captured my heart.

So, my warning to others is to not let the desire of another uke take away your joy of playing the one you have.

Teek
05-08-2015, 09:32 PM
I've learned that is more fun to play ukulele than look for a new one. (snip)

So, my warning to others is to not let the desire of another uke take away your joy of playing the one you have.

I agree with the above even though I have a closet full of ukes right now. I enjoy them all but I have narrowed down to my faves and the others will be re-homed.

I'm currently not playing any of them because I have a carbon fiber short scale steel string guitar. As much as I love the sound of the uke, I realized that steel string acoustic guitar just wrings my heart out like nothing else except the cello. Guitar is somewhat accessible to me, though not as much as uke, but I'm interested in it for country blues. It's stretching my reach a bit and there is more availability of songs I want to attempt to learn. I can't play much of anything on either one but still enjoying the process, and hoping it is good for keeping neurons active in a senior brain.

However I enjoyed my exploration into ukuleles, it was a blast. It got me through some really unsettling times. Now I want to downsize to what I find I like best: solid woods, tenor scale or long scale concert (my 16 inch Donaldson), thin fast Martin style necks (and no flat area on the back of the neck), cedar and spruce tops, radiused fretboards, rounded backs, fatter rounded frets like on Martins and newer Kamakas (I really dislike thin bar frets). I want fret markers and I also like side dots but it's not a deal killer. The whole package should sound awesome all the way up the neck. I want ring, not plink. The very most important thing: a perfect setup or as close as you can get for your tastes.

My best feeling uke to play is the Donaldson custom and then my Risa LP tenor. The Risa is perfection as far as overall feel of the neck and fretboard, but it's heavy since it's a solid body and feels less spontaneous and airy, though it sounds amazing. After that is my Pono Pro Classic and my Collings UT-2.

I find the prettier a uke the less inclined I am to play it, same with the guitars. I play the Pono more than the Collings. I have one guitar I think is lovely, but the CF (a Composite Acoustics Cargo) can take some bangs and bumps. I find the 22.75 inch scale of the shorter scale CF a bit more manageable than the 25.5 Tacoma PM20.

So as much as I love vintage, retro, and antiques in general, I don't want any more older ukes, other than my white label Kamaka. I want the refined, well designed, quality built higher end instruments, because they sound great, and have a refined fit and quality feel.

greenie44
05-09-2015, 01:33 AM
Well, things do change. After decades of avoiding them, I find I kind of like mushrooms in some situations. And, for reasons I cannot understand, I find myself hankering for some scotch, a beverage I maybe drank once or twice before.

As far as ukes go, my acquisitions were mainly to fill in gaps of types of ukes I did not have - 4 string low G and re-entrant, an Risa electric and a steel string electric, a really great player, and a couple of travel ukes. I have a few ukes which were 'stepping stone' ukes I bought to see if I would like that type of uke and then bought something better of the same type.

But with the fairly broad selection I have now (I basically only play tenor), I don't feel a very strong need for more. Although there is that cocobolo I lust for, and one other that I just might find a way to get. But that's it - I promise. And I think it took the last few years of casting about to feel this satisfied with my lot.

JJFN
05-09-2015, 03:06 AM
I started on the guitar at 13, (I wanted to be Elvis Presley), my first music teacher had me playing Love Me Tender in a few short weeks. Then he quit the music school and my new teacher started me on scales etc and that just turned me off. I bought a tenor guitar and a Martin knock off and played off and on, very much mostly off through the years. Then after retiring while browsing in a big box music store, I noticed a baritone ukulele. I was again bitten by the allure of music. Didn't like my first baritone, so I treated myself to a Kamaka baritone. Liked that but it sounded too much like a guitar, obviously. This was before I joined UU and found out about tuning a bari GCEA. So I bought my Ohana soprano. This fulfilled my need for a ukulele sounding instrument. Then I contacted a mild case of UAS and purchased my Martin concert and Koaloha tenor. So now with various tunings I can achieve different sounds, all pretty much in the "ukulele sound" that I was looking for. Ive gotten away from the soprano. When I want a high G sound, I use my Martin concert. I spend most of my playing time now on the tenor. The UAS has subsided, I am very happy with my current stable of ukuleles, but as for the future, who knows. Due to a lack of play the Ohana soprano will probably be sold soon. So that is my musical journey to this point.

Pickinguker
05-09-2015, 07:45 PM
I totally agree with JustinJ "The ukulele is an honest instrument. It's simple but profound at the same time. It's captured my heart"
Until last year I could not stand any ukulele. I found this instrument ridiculous and its sound awfull and definately uninteresting.
I started with my first ukulele after watching on utube very interesting things with ukulele. Now i am catched. I love this instruments. I have almost abandonned my guitars.

Hippie Dribble
05-09-2015, 07:54 PM
I still want more than I need. (Future title of autobiography) :wallbash: