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View Full Version : Koaloha's "single-piece sidewall construction"



Andy Chen
05-03-2015, 11:40 PM
Hi everyone, what does this feature mean and what are its benefits?

coolkayaker1
05-04-2015, 03:41 AM
That's a great question, Andy. Do you have that phrase in context, like a link to the webpage or ad? Is it listed as a feature, sort of like the Musabi sound hole? I look forward to the answers of others.

Kayak Jim
05-04-2015, 04:00 AM
I was surprised that on my concert there is no kerfed lining between the sides and top/back. Could this be what they are referring to?

Maybe gives a minutely larger effective surface area of the top (?)

Just checked the sides on mine- definitely two pieces.

Andy Chen
05-04-2015, 06:31 AM
That's the exact phrase listed on HMS. Not taken out of a paragraph or a longer passage.

spookelele
05-04-2015, 08:06 AM
Maybe it's the unibrace?

http://i80.photobucket.com/albums/j179/karengarret/Koaloha%20Factory%20tour/IMG_0746.jpg

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
05-04-2015, 08:15 AM
I'm not sure but I think what they might be talking about is that both side pieces are one continuous piece of wood with no seam at the butt. Papa Okami has always had a unique and inventive approach to building.

AndrewKuker
05-04-2015, 10:01 AM
This is just a phrase I had taken from their old website and basically just means there is no lining. Part of how they get away with this is by having sides that are thicker than average. This may also have something to do with their sound. The mass of the sides has an effect on the acoustics (many claim it makes the top accelerate more). I know with a drum, typically, the thicker you make the sides the louder it becomes.

strumsilly
05-04-2015, 12:35 PM
I'm not sure but I think what they might be talking about is that both side pieces are one continuous piece of wood with no seam at the butt. Papa Okami has always had a unique and inventive approach to building.
there is a butt seam in my concert and tenor Koaloha, so I don't think that's it.

Andy Chen
05-04-2015, 01:28 PM
This is just a phrase I had taken from their old website and basically just means there is no lining. Part of how they get away with this is by having sides that are thicker than average. This may also have something to do with their sound. The mass of the sides has an effect on the acoustics (many claim it makes the top accelerate more). I know with a drum, typically, the thicker you make the sides the louder it becomes.

Thanks Andrew, that's really interesting.

Inksplosive AL
05-04-2015, 04:42 PM
Well now...

I have a Koahola concert from 2002 if my memory serves me, it has a three piece body. One piece top one piece back and a one piece side with no seam on the bottom. I wonder are they bringing back this design?

merlin666
01-01-2019, 08:52 AM
Maybe it's the unibrace?

http://i80.photobucket.com/albums/j179/karengarret/Koaloha%20Factory%20tour/IMG_0746.jpg

I was on the KoAloha factory tour and they explained the unibrace as one of their key design features, in addition to the lack of kerfing. But when I got home and looked at my 2000 concert, it only has a brace on the top and one at the bottom and not the single brace design (and no kerfing). Does anyone know about when they introduced the unibrace feature, and if this was to reduce production cost or to increase stability of the uke?