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terrgy
05-29-2015, 03:01 AM
I need a little help please.

My Kala came tuned in GCEA, which is standard C tuning. Some songs in my song book call for key of G.

What would be tuning for each string to tune to the key of G? I am thinking the A would be retuned to G.

Terry

The Big Kahuna
05-29-2015, 03:17 AM
G tuning or key? There's a difference.

terrgy
05-29-2015, 03:22 AM
In the song book it says : key of G

Rllink
05-29-2015, 03:42 AM
Same tuning, different set of chords.

The Big Kahuna
05-29-2015, 04:03 AM
What he said ^^

terrgy
05-29-2015, 04:06 AM
Thanks for the info.

Ambient Doughnut
05-29-2015, 04:09 AM
Yes, you don't need to retune your ukulele to match the key of the song. Although occasionally you may do this to make certain keys easier.

Key of G just means that the chords will be found in the key of Gmajor.

These are:
1. G
2. Am
3. Bm
4. C
5. D
6. Em
7. F#dim

Typically you'll find the 1st, 4th and 5th chords: G, C, D


The D may well be played as a D7

terrgy
05-29-2015, 05:09 AM
Thanks for the info. I also enjoyed your videos.

k0k0peli
05-29-2015, 05:18 AM
Major and minor scales are sequences of notes at certain intervals. A piece's key indicates where those sequences start. Unless the instrument is tuned open, it's fairly straightforward to play the notes and chords of many keys all with one tuning. As mentioned, pieces in each key are usually built with a certain set of chords. A piece in the key of C might contain C, Em, F, and G chords. Transpose that to the key of G and we'd use G, Bm, C, and D chords. All those are simply played on a uke with GCEA tuning.

ubulele
05-29-2015, 05:31 AM
You can play perfectly well in the key of G using C tuning (or D tuning, or Bb tuning, for that matter). The C tuning doesn't restrict you to the key of C; in fact, I play in any key I choose; I just can't use open strings as often in most keys. But all the open string notes are part of the G major scale, so C tuning fits the key of G fairly well. You just have to play up the neck in order to play an entire scale tonic to tonic.

Retuning A to G gives you "open C" tuning, since the open strings play the notes in the C major chord (CEG) and no others. In open C tuning, you can play major chords with just a barre straight across the frets, making this a popular tuning for slide uke. To play in G, your primary chords would be G (I), C (IV) and D (V), with F (bVII) added for a Mixolydian cast, often encountered in blues, rock and country songs. You can play these chords with barres respectively at the 7th, 0th (nut), 2nd and 5th frets. This tuning is a fourth higher than the most standard banjo tuning (g)DBGD, aka. open G, so the basic chord shapes are the same, although the chord names are different. Clawhammer ukists often use open C tuning to play in C or G.

There are several ways you could retune specifically to G. The "standard" G tuning (used widely on baritones) is DGBE (dogbone), normally nowadays using a low D (linear tuning)—of course, you'd need a different string set to switch from GCEA to DGBE. The major advantages for playing in G tuning is that G is the lowest note, you can play the entire G scale in first position, and you can play each note of the G chord on an open string, and open E is also in the scale of G. The lowest strings, G and D, are good for droning and positioned for easy play with the thumb, as in clawhammer style; they're also the tonic and dominant notes commonly used for drop-thumbing in slack-key styles.

The chord of G contains the notes GBD, so an "open G" tuning that would suit a C-tuning string set is GBDG. The G6 chord contains the notes GBDE, which could be achieved by tuning a standard set GDEB, raising the 2nd and 4th strings a whole step—I personally haven't heard this tuning used on ukes, but it's a distinct possibility, with many of the advantages of C6 tuning in terms of chord construction. G7 tuning would be GDFB, G Wahine (GM7) tuning would be GDF#B. How about Gm7 tuning: GDFBb?

Another tuning amenable to the key of G is an all-fourths tuning: GCFBb, raising the 1st and 2nd strings a half-step. Bass guitar also uses an all-fouths tuning (EADG); you may recognize these notes as corresponding to the lowest four notes of standard guitar tuning. So there's a lot of precedent for using such a tuning, even if it's not common in the uke world.

Other banjo tunings also adapt well to uke. The uke G analogue for banjoists is the key of D. Translating some banjo C and D tunings to uke G, we get:
Open G: G B D G (described above; adapted from banjo Open D)
Open G: G D G B (adapted from banjo Open C)
Double G: G D G A (banjo Double C is also called C Modal)
Standard G: G D F# A (adapted from banjo Standard C)
G Minor: G Bb D G
G Minor Modal: G C D G or F C D G
All-4ths G Minor Modal: E A D G
D Minor Mixolydian: G D G C

WARNING: some of these may be uke string-breakers. Instead you may want to tune a whole step lower, then capo at the 2nd fret. On banjo, to play in D one often tunes to a C tuning then capoes at the 2nd fret (including capoing the drone string at the 7th fret).

terrgy
05-29-2015, 06:55 AM
Wow. That's some good stuff. A little over my head at this point, since my ukulele career spans around 30 days. But I thank you none the less. Some of it I do understand.

My favorite instrument is the tremolo harmonica, and I play it by ear. I really don't understand any of the key stuff on this instrument, but I can play just about any song I care to play, as long as I know the tune.

I'm hoping for the same results with the ukulele, but they are two vastly different instruments, with the ukulele being way more difficult.

Thanks again.

k0k0peli
05-30-2015, 05:49 PM
Wow. That's some good stuff. A little over my head at this point, since my ukulele career spans around 30 days. But I thank you none the less. Some of it I do understand.

My favorite instrument is the tremolo harmonica, and I play it by ear. I really don't understand any of the key stuff on this instrument, but I can play just about any song I care to play, as long as I know the tune.

I'm hoping for the same results with the ukulele, but they are two vastly different instruments, with the ukulele being way more difficult.

Thanks again. I love mouth organs too. No, echo and tremolo and octave harmonicas are NOT blues harps -- they use different temperaments and tunings. But just as blues players 'cross' to other keys on semi-diatonic Richter-tuned harps, so can players of diatonic solo- and scale-tuned harmonicas.

Let's say I'm blowing a scale-tuned Hohner Weekender in C (it's the world's most popular harmonica). I can play BYE BYE LOVE's verse in the key of C starting at 6-blow (E note). I could also play the melody 'crossed' in the key of G, starting at 8-suck (B note). Tunes with simpler scales can be played in other keys on a C harmonica too. Just be careful about adjacent holes -- the harmonies can get jarring!

Anyway, you can blow chords on that Weekender, from a simple C-Am-F-G turnaround to more complex stuff. And you can play many chords on a uke without changing the tuning. Although changing tunings can be fun too, but that's another topic. :D

terrgy
06-01-2015, 11:31 AM
You are right, a tremolo harmonica is not a blues harp. I am not a fan of blues harp, and I have probably 30 of them in a drawer. But I love playing tremolo. I love playing it with my dulcimer, but at a recent get together, a guy was there playing a little on a ukulele. I played along with my tremolo. I decided right there and then I would learn ukulele. Now I am about 35 days into my adventure.

My favorite tremolos are Hering Vencedoras. Shipping cost more from Brazil than some of there tremolos. What are your favorites.

k0k0peli
06-01-2015, 07:04 PM
My favorite tremolos are Hering Vencedoras. Shipping cost more from Brazil than some of there tremolos. What are your favorites. As with much of my life, I'm totally amateur on mouth organs, too. And I'm cheap. I currently have a Hohner Echo Celeste in A; Hohner Weekender, Huang Cathedral (octave), and Suzuki Study-24 in C (I prefer the Weekender); and Suzuki Study-24 in G. I've also an old Hohner Echo in A and D but that's really better seen than heard. :( I also have a Koch Chromatic 10 (Richter tuning) and Hohner Chromonica 10 and Chrometta 12 (both solo tuning). One of these days I'll master RHAPSODY IN BLUE on the Chromonica 10. Right. ;) Anyway, I'm totally unfamiliar with Hering Vencedoras. Guess I need to do some research.