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CINTAMANI
03-11-2009, 03:36 PM
Hi all - total noob - first post...:bowdown:
Short intro: built a wooden sailboat a few years ago, bought a uke a few weeks ago and love the little thing, have tools and offcuts (Western Red Cedar, Honduras Mahogany, Sitka Spruce) and am totally envious of everyone on the forum who has built a uke...but...I can't get Hana Lima Ia shipped to Canada. Any other manuals around that deal with ukuluthierology...ukuluthieritis...you know, that virus that you're all infected with? (I see that Chuck (Moore) recommends Cumpiano's guitar manual but that might discourage me until I get at least one under my belt) Thanks in advance.

cpatch
03-11-2009, 03:47 PM
I'd be willing to order a copy from Hana Lima Ia and then ship it to you for whatever the cost is to me.

Rubbertoe
03-11-2009, 04:18 PM
I can't get Hana Lima Ia shipped to Canada.

Did they change their selling/shipping policies? I ordered one last year (ummm... haven't built anything yet :confused: )from them and I don't remember having any problems getting to the GTA.

CINTAMANI
03-11-2009, 04:32 PM
thanks for the instant replies...I was just in the shop copying the profile of my cordoba to see how many ukes I can make - ha! cpatch - thanks, and yes, but let me see if rubbertoe knows something I don't first - I was just going by their website - I figured they didn't want to mess around with international shipping or something.
I shudda menshuned zwell: furst forum posting speriense.

CINTAMANI
03-11-2009, 04:42 PM
a thousand pardons - how could I have missed it - they certainly do ship internationally. I'll order one tomorrow. To press my luck just a little more...any other titles?

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
03-11-2009, 04:45 PM
The Cumpiano book is only if you are serious about building and want to take this somewhere. For the very casual builder, building one or two ukes, there are at least two other uke building books out there as well that I know of. One by Gilbert , the other by Wickham I think. This is off the top of my head, which I seem to have misplaced today. Someone else can help you with the titles. They have a different approach that doesn't mesh with my style but you might find them helpful. Could probably get them used from Amazon. You NEED all the books anyway, and all the tools, and all the toys................

thejumpingflea
03-11-2009, 04:58 PM
The Cumpiano book is only if you are serious about building and want to take this somewhere. For the very casual builder, building one or two ukes, there are at least two other uke building books out there as well that I know of. One by Gilbert , the other by Wickham I think. This is off the top of my head, which I seem to have misplaced today. Someone else can help you with the titles. They have a different approach that doesn't mesh with my style but you might find them helpful. Could probably get them used from Amazon. You NEED all the books anyway, and all the tools, and all the toys................

Like the $50 dollar blank straight edge? :shaka:

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
03-11-2009, 05:42 PM
Like the $50 dollar blank straight edge? :shaka:
And the dozen routers........

Kekani
03-11-2009, 06:42 PM
Dennis Gilbert and Henry Wickham both have books. Get the Hana Lima I`a one. Only drawback is that you'll be set for only a Spanish heel.

Ditto to Chuck on Cumpiano's book. While a bit outdated (okay, a lot), there's a reason its referred to as the "bible". He (Cumpiano) has some updates on his website, like his bolt on neck joint, and his slant toward tap tuning (or lack thereof).

-Aaron

CINTAMANI
03-13-2009, 12:03 PM
Many thanks - waiting for Hana Lima to get back to me and heading to the library to see if I can find the other titles.
In the meantime, anyone care to show off a "uke stand"? I know someone out there has designed and built one - I need a project while I'm waiting for the book to come.
(and someone please tell me if this makes me a post-whore or thread-cutter or whatever else might be politically incorrect):bowdown:

Pete Howlett
03-13-2009, 12:16 PM
OO err, not the book question again... I am not a fan of ukulele building books tho the free download you get from the stewmac site ref their uke kit is very good because it's free! There are plenty of guitar building books. Those cited do not float my boat. You can nevertheless get loads of info from YouTube which is practical and informative. I have posted builders vids there and am always looking for new stuff. For inspiration, Taylor factory fridays are a must and if you can get them, John Mayes videos.

Best of all, visit a builder and see how it is done. When I got back into building after a long rest and a business going down the recessionary tubes back in the 90's, I spent 5 weeks building my own guitar in a luthier shop - he liked what he saw, we went into brief partnership and I ended up building ukulele for a living,

cpatch
03-13-2009, 01:42 PM
In the meantime, anyone care to show off a "uke stand"? I know someone out there has designed and built one - I need a project while I'm waiting for the book to come.
There are some cool designs here:

http://www.woodcentral.com/contests/guitarstand/contest_guitarstandresults.shtml

Harold O.
03-13-2009, 02:16 PM
In the meantime, anyone care to show off a "uke stand"? I know someone out there has designed and built one - I need a project while I'm waiting for the book to come.

Let me find my own horn...

I came up with a guitar rest design that could work for a uke if scaled down. It's the most popular request on my site. And I've sold a bunch of them.
http://www.westhillswood.com/wood-guitar-rest.html

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
03-13-2009, 03:00 PM
He (Cumpiano) has some updates on his website, like his bolt on neck joint, and his slant toward tap tuning (or lack thereof).
Aaron, do you know what that website is off the top of your head? I couldn't find it doing a Google search.
Thanks, Chuck

Kekani
03-13-2009, 06:44 PM
Aaron, do you know what that website is off the top of your head? I couldn't find it doing a Google search.
Thanks, Chuck

When you see this, you're going to bang your head against the wall. Don't bang it too hard, I'm probably going to need your assistance on April 25th <grin>.
http://www.cumpiano.com/

Because of him, I threw a compound in the two cutaways that I've done recently. As for tap tuning, I refer to his newsletter 23, which I find an interesting read, as is his thoughts on Kasha.

-Aaron

koalohapaul
03-13-2009, 08:27 PM
I don't know any book titles, as I learned from watching my father and my own personal experimentation, but I do research wood, wood working, and general luthery online, when I have a question.

I think getting started is the most overwhelming. Doing something you've never done before, everything will be new. Once you have a better concept of what you're doing and where you want to go, it will open up even more questions, but at least you'll have the basics down.

Sorry I can't offer any book titles to help you out, but I'll do my best to answer any specific questions you may have in the future. There's a bunch of talented luthiers who post here and you'll definitely get more than one way to screw in a light bulb.

Pete Howlett
03-14-2009, 01:39 AM
Great advice Paul. This is one of the few crafts/trades for which a formal apprenticeship/education as practically non-existent because we all do our own thing! Also, the problem with applying guitar principles to ukulele building is that they often do not correlate. Some builders here can do it because they are attentuated but I cannot tap tune - I just cannot hear the subtle nuances on such a small body. However, I can do it on guitars where the frequencies and resonances are far more comlex and bracing patters, scalloping, carbon reinforcement become much more significant in modelling the sound architecture of the instrument.

The brilliant thing about ukulele building is it is a true 'amateurs' craft in that with a little patience and attention to detail, some basic hand skills you can make a pretty good first attempt. And of course, if anything goes wrong, it is not a major disaster in expense. I'd hate to crack a koa rib on a guitar - on a uke, it is a shame but no 'big' deal.

So my advice for what it is worth is go get a Stewmac or MGM kit. Learn your chops for $99 and then get one of my upgrade kits (shameless self promotion) then do it from scratch. Easing your way in like this will give you confidence in the 'simple' tasks like accurate gluing and placement of components, simple carving so that you can tackle hand bending, binding and inlay later.

Go for it - it will give you the greatest satisfaction outside marriage, parenthood and dining out at a good restaurant!

CINTAMANI
03-14-2009, 09:14 AM
Thanks again - I appreciate all your input (and output!) The local library has several guitarmaking books and I spent the evening poring over Cumpiano's, among others. I'm happy to discover that many of the processes are "familiar" and that I have many of the necessary tools. I try not to get overexcited these days (age thing) but I'm practically rubbing my hands together in glee, having found something to build that (a) I can do indoors (winter in Canada is no joke, even in BC), (b) requires very little wood and shop space (to start) and (c) seems to have endless creative possibilities.
I was very fortunate to have a mentor for my boatbuilding foray and I'm still awed by the generosity and willingness to share exhibited by those in love with their craft.

Now, if Hana Lima would just get back to me so I can get started...:)

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
03-14-2009, 10:44 AM
When you see this, you're going to bang your head against the wall. Don't bang it too hard, I'm probably going to need your assistance on April 25th <grin>.
http://www.cumpiano.com/

Because of him, I threw a compound in the two cutaways that I've done recently. As for tap tuning, I refer to his newsletter 23, which I find an interesting read, as is his thoughts on Kasha.

-Aaron
Wow, a lot of stuff there. Gonna take me a while to get through it all.
Thanks!

CINTAMANI
03-16-2009, 04:13 PM
Pete - I appreciate the recommendation of a kit, but I have a bunch of boards left over from the boat that I want to use. I've been saving it for something special and I think I've found it. I have enough old-growth WRC to make at least a dozen soundboards, probably more. It is very tight-grained and was sitting in someone's barn for 25 years before it came to me. The offcuts are between 1/8" and 1" thick, all quartersawn, some more than 10 inches wide. I have enough HM for a couple of solid necks, probably four or five if I laminate them, and enough SS for all the braces. I think I can turn out a decent first try, we'll have to see. Hopefully all I need to purchase are the tuners and a set of strings (as well as the $50 blank straightedge and the ten routers) BTW: I kind of despise my router (can't hear the birds) and love my low-angle block plane and spokeshave.

I do have an aesthetic concern using the cedar and mahogany together: without a bright highlight (rosette, binding or inlay) I think the two woods will look bland. This is my experience with the boat - judicious application of paint makes the brightwork sparkle! I have no inlay experience but I'm not afraid to try. Thanks for all your posts and vids (I spent all day today trying to get through all the threads in the lounge - almost there)