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wawakelvin
07-05-2015, 11:26 AM
I want to play simple melodies by ear. My approach is going to be learning major scales and doing interval training exercises online. Is this a good way to go about it? Any tips on interval training? Thanks.

Down Up Dick
07-05-2015, 11:35 AM
I'd say so. That's what I do. I usually sing the note-names (A-B-C#, etc), to help me learn where the notes are on the fret board. Intervals help a lot. Learn 'em on some other instrument, or write the scale down and study it. Arpeggiating helps too.

Just noodle along, and one session, all of a sudden, you'll find yourself playing a tune! :old:

Nickie
07-05-2015, 01:45 PM
Jim D'Ville, who is a contributor here, teaches Play by Ear.

Kayak Jim
07-06-2015, 12:57 AM
Jim D'Ville, who is a contributor here, teaches Play by Ear.

I took his workshop and it's pretty good. Basic (C, F, G7) but good. I think he has several levels in his CDs/ downloads.

Rllink
07-06-2015, 05:24 AM
What is interval training, and what are interval training exercises. This all sounds interesting. I have been working on hitting notes with my voice in much the way Dick described, except I have not been voicing the name of the note. I've just been la la la. That is a good idea, singing the name of the note. One of those simple things that I just don't think of.

Down Up Dick
07-06-2015, 06:13 AM
Hi, Rollie, an interval is the distance between a note and another note. A to C is a third (interval) C to E is another third. A to B is a 2nd, A to D is a 4th. A to E is a 5th and etc. If you have access to a piano, you can sing the intervals. Start with the C and just use the white keys--name the notes as you go.

Happy warbling! :old:

k0k0peli
07-06-2015, 08:31 AM
Hi, Rollie, an interval is the distance between a note and another note. A to C is a third (interval) C to E is another third. A to B is a 2nd, A to D is a 4th. A to E is a 5th and etc. If you have access to a piano, you can sing the intervals. Start with the C and just use the white keys--name the notes as you go. But keep in mind that A to C is a minor third (three semitones) while C to E is a major third (four semitones). Q: What's the definition of a semitone? A: Two oboes playing in unison. :) But at least you're not dealing with Harry Partch's 43-microtone octave system.

Down Up Dick
07-06-2015, 08:49 AM
Mebbe, k0k0peli, but you're splitting hairs. Everyone would call 'em thirds. Why make instruction confusing? If Rollie goes to a piano, accordion, organ, etc, he'll learn what thirds, fourths, etc. are. The rest is theory.

However, thanks for correcting me; I guess I should always aim for perfection--Ahhh, well . . . :old:

gobes
07-06-2015, 09:19 AM
He's not splitting hairs and it's well worth pointing out the difference between a minor third and a major third. They don't sound the same.

Down Up Dick
07-06-2015, 09:33 AM
Good Lord! FELLOW UKERS: I, DOWN UP DICK, WAS NOT PERFECTLY ACCURATE IN MY INSTRUCTION TO RLLINK.

Mea culpa, mea culpa, mea culpa! :old:

ksiegel
07-06-2015, 10:04 AM
I agree - go to Jim D'Ville's website. His DVDs are very good, but his workshops are even better (because you can ask him questions!)

When I went to his Play-By-Ear workshop, I didn't know how much - if anything - I would learn, because I don't read music (notation or tab), and play only by ear.

But I picked up a lot, along with some reinforcement, and some moments of "Oh.. So THAT"S why that doesn't work for me!".

To me, his sessions are worth the money.

I'd also recommend Stuart Fuchs' website, and the lessons Aldrine has here on UU. All well worth it.



-Kurt

k0k0peli
07-06-2015, 11:04 PM
No hairs (nor hares) were split recently but some (and not hares) were torn out by the roots. Anyway, once we get above seconds, not all simply-numbered intervals are created equal. BTW music is funny -- thirds and fifths here are nothing like fractions (one gets bigger, one gets smaller) and nothing like dessert portions (I'll take fourths on the baklava, thanks). Yet another case where our Anglish language provides terms used in very different ways.

Down Up Dick
07-07-2015, 05:10 AM
Yesterday, I was certainly guilty of not being thorough with my info, but I was only trying to explain what intervals were. I didn't think that Rollie was gonna go do a bunch of interval exercises. And, actually, the info about the piano keys was correct. It just didn't go far enough.

Anyway, k0k0peli, I stand corrected. Next time, I'll leave instructions to you and ubulele et al . . . :old:

Tootler
07-07-2015, 05:34 AM
Yesterday, I was certainly guilty of not being thorough with my info, but I was only trying to explain what intervals were. I didn't think that Rollie was gonna go do a bunch of interval exercises. And, actually, the info about the piano keys was correct. It just didn't go far enough.

Anyway, k0k0peli, I stand corrected. Next time, I'll leave instructions to you and ubulele et al . . . :old:

As I understand it, you were trying to keep things simple for the benefit of those whose knowledge of music theory was limited and there was nothing actually wrong with what you said. You could make a case for mentioning the difference between a major and a minor third as they are important to the sound of music but I feel the way some others followed on with from your initial post was a little insensitive in tone.

One of the problems with threads like this is that it's very easy to go into far too much detail and to confuse the OP and I see that too often.

If I've simplified things in such a case I usually say that's what I've done so that others replying subsequently realise that's the case. I don't think you've anything to apologise for, Dick.

Down Up Dick
07-07-2015, 05:44 AM
Well, exactly, Geoff, and thanks for your kind words. I appreciate them. I don't like to be wrong. :old:

wawakelvin
07-07-2015, 06:10 AM
jesus christ try to confuse me all you want. i may be a beginner musician but i can still understand language and logic

Rllink
07-07-2015, 06:11 AM
As I understand it, you were trying to keep things simple for the benefit of those whose knowledge of music theory was limited and there was nothing actually wrong with what you said. You could make a case for mentioning the difference between a major and a minor third as they are important to the sound of music but I feel the way some others followed on with from your initial post was a little insensitive in tone.

One of the problems with threads like this is that it's very easy to go into far too much detail and to confuse the OP and I see that too often.

If I've simplified things in such a case I usually say that's what I've done so that others replying subsequently realise that's the case. I don't think you've anything to apologise for, Dick.
I have to say, that whenever I ask a question here, I appreciate a simple explanation that I can build on, much more than getting smothered by an avalanche of information. The later, as well meaning as it is, is worthless to me. I need to start with basics.

Down Up Dick
07-07-2015, 06:19 AM
My thoughts exactly, Rollie. Ahhh, well . . . Water over the dam. :old:

Down Up Dick
07-07-2015, 08:42 AM
You're probably right, ubulele. :old:

Ukettante
07-09-2015, 12:01 AM
I recommend downloading the functional ear trainer. It'll whip your ear into shape. I train on it about 20 minutes a day on my commute to work.

Before the functional ear trainer, I spent about half a year on a regular interval trainer app. I exceled at it but found what I gained not really practical.

Oh, one more thing: Start playing melodies from classic songs by ear on your ukulele. The best way to play by ear is to play by ear.