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kvehe
07-24-2015, 05:17 AM
This must be Insult-the-Ukulele Week.

On Wednesday, my uke instructor (the uke instructor!) told me that you don't have to ever change strings on a uke because no matter what you do, they always sound dead. (Note to self: forget the private lessons and stick with Internet instruction and give him a Pono/Mainland/Boat Paddle/KoAloha/take-your-pick as a parting gift.)

Also on Wednesday, my guitar instructor told me that if I brought in a uke, he'd teach me some chords and how to strum. "It's really easy," he said. I told him that what I wanted to do, rather than strum, was play classical music on the uke. He told me (implying by his tone that I'm an idiot) that you can't do that because of the limited range. (Note to self: show him what I can already do.)

Thursday morning, a colleague's iPhone was playing "You Can't Always Get What You Want". I told her that we had worked on that song in my uke lesson the evening before, and that next week we're moving on to "Gimme Shelter". She said, "Are you *still* taking lessons? How could you not know how to play the uke after all this time? It only has four strings, right?" (Note to self: consider the source.)

Thank you for listening to me whine, and have a wonderful uke-filled weekend.

sukie
07-24-2015, 05:38 AM
Hahahaha......idiots.


And I don't even like that word.

janeray1940
07-24-2015, 05:43 AM
I've just got... no words about the first two points*, but after almost 6 years, I get the "still taking lessons" comment quite a lot. And I never quite know how to answer it other than a comment along the lines of "it's fairly easy to learn to play and fairly hard to learn to play well, and - I'm only interested in the latter."

*Idiots. Yeah, that.

kohanmike
07-24-2015, 05:51 AM
Just to post an opposite experience I had recently, my nephew, who is a very accomplished guitarist and film composer, said to me the other day after I played "Sway" on my uke while just sitting around "You're getting much better, sounds really good."

Rllink
07-24-2015, 05:54 AM
I've just got... no words about the first two points*, but after almost 6 years, I get the "still taking lessons" comment quite a lot. And I never quite know how to answer it other than a comment along the lines of "it's fairly easy to learn to play and fairly hard to learn to play well, and - I'm only interested in the latter."

*Idiots. Yeah, that.I do find those first two responses strange, considering where they are coming from, but for a lot of people who do not have any experience with ukuleles, or music for that matter, when the topic comes up in conversation they just have to respond in some way, so they do. You can either educate them, and most of them couldn't care less, or you can take it for what it is, and move on. But, I get similar comments once in a while. I just try not to talk much about ukuleles to people, just because they don't care, and their responses to the subject are usually ignorant. And that really isn't their fault.

janeray1940
07-24-2015, 06:26 AM
I just try not to talk much about ukuleles to people, just because they don't care, and their responses to the subject are usually ignorant. And that really isn't their fault.

Very true, and I do the same - I talk ukulele with other ukulele people but few others, even fellow musicians who play instruments other than uke.

I have a friend who I call the "ukulele ambassador" because within moments of meeting someone, she more often than not will somehow fit ukulele into the conversation - which I think is great, but I think I just lack the patience she has to educate people. I mean, most of the time when I do bring up the uke topic with non-uke people, they immediately come to the Tiny Tim/Train/Iz/maaaaaybe Zooey Deschanel (or other "cute girl with glasses who is more of a vocalist than a player") conclusion, none of which is remotely close to what I do - and I get a bit weary of explaining myself. So I don't, which I suppose makes me part of the problem rather than the solution...

Rllink
07-24-2015, 07:22 AM
Very true, and I do the same - I talk ukulele with other ukulele people but few others, even fellow musicians who play instruments other than uke.

I have a friend who I call the "ukulele ambassador" because within moments of meeting someone, she more often than not will somehow fit ukulele into the conversation - which I think is great, but I think I just lack the patience she has to educate people. I mean, most of the time when I do bring up the uke topic with non-uke people, they immediately come to the Tiny Tim/Train/Iz/maaaaaybe Zooey Deschanel (or other "cute girl with glasses who is more of a vocalist than a player") conclusion, none of which is remotely close to what I do - and I get a bit weary of explaining myself. So I don't, which I suppose makes me part of the problem rather than the solution...
I have a friend who is passionate about duck hunting. It comes up in almost every conversation with him. He invites me to go duck hunting with him in the fall, almost every time we talk. I have no interest in duck hunting, and the last thing I want to do is go out and sit in a boat with him and his wet dog, waiting for a duck to come by, so that I can shoot it. But he lives for it, and that is OK. When I start going on about ukuleles, I try to think about how I react to my friend's never ending chatter about duck hunting, and try to adjust my display of enthusiasm accordingly. But he describes himself as the "ambassador of duck hunting". He thinks the whole world would be better, if we all just went duck hunting. You know, that is just human nature I guess.

MickeyD
07-24-2015, 07:32 AM
That's great about the duck hunting. It is important to not discount people's interests when they don't match yours. Important, but not always easy.

When I was bragging to an old coworker that I was about to purchase a Breedlove Masterclass Ukulele (!!), my bass playing coworker snorted and said something along the lines of "they make ukuleles more than $100? They're toys!". It kinda blew my mind that even another instrumentalist would just kinda dismiss it so easily. Eh, I just laugh to myself and move on with my day.

CeeJay
07-24-2015, 08:10 AM
That's great about the duck hunting. It is important to not discount people's interests when they don't match yours. Important, but not always easy.

When I was bragging to an old coworker that I was about to purchase a Breedlove Masterclass Ukulele (!!), my bass playing coworker snorted and said something along the lines of "they make ukuleles more than $100? They're toys!". It kinda blew my mind that even another instrumentalist would just kinda dismiss it so easily. Eh, I just laugh to myself and move on with my day.

Anyone who plays a fish is going to be a bit odd.....


But we have to remember that not everybody shares each others passions and interests . So I think that those who go to the popular/well known examples of uke players aren't being rude.

That's just all they know and are desperately trying to fulfil the role of the listener in the conversation.

I can clearly understand the dudgeon coming from the first posters comment , especially the moron who is allegedly a Ukulele tutor.

Dingbats like the guitar tutor giving it large my immediate answer would be...especially if they are armed with a guitar...just point to the four strings, the DGBE at the Fifth fret and say " Well from there up the ukulele is all that , so how is that a limited range then ? More Challenging, arguably."

If you want, you could get his name wrong and call him Dick , unless of course that is his name. In which case his parents had great foresight.
If it's a female tutor,all the above but just add a tut....


:biglaugh:

peanuts56
07-24-2015, 08:13 AM
When someone starts ragging on me about the ukulele I show them a youtube video of Jake or James Hill or any of the other masters and that usually shuts them up. One other video I show to my disbelievers is not Uke related but involves the Balalaika. The individuals name is Alexi Arkhipovsky (not sure on the spelling) and he's absolutely amazing.He does more with three strings than is believable. One of the youtube videos is called Balalaika Amok. If you have a few minutes check him out. There's also a great video of him doing Mozart's Turkish March with Tommy Emmanuel.

philpot
07-24-2015, 08:18 AM
I was contracted to teach lessons at a local music store, but they never got around to assigning me students because in their view, their existing guitar instructors are just as good at teaching ukulele as I would be, and the uke is just "intro to guitar" anyways. It's amazing how accomplished musicians can perpetuate the stereotypes. I tried to convey that the way I teach ukulele is uke-specific, and while there are lots of things that transfer over, there are things about uke that are unique to the instrument. But I can't change the fact that they view the uke as cutesy and non-serious. The best I can do is keep going to local open mic nights and proving that I can hang with the local guitar players and hope that I can turn some people on to the uke that way.

CeeJay
07-24-2015, 08:20 AM
When someone starts ragging on me about the ukulele I show them a youtube video of Jake or James Hill or any of the other masters and that usually shuts them up. One other video I show to my disbelievers is not Uke related but involves the Balalaika. The individuals name is Alexi Arkhipovsky (not sure on the spelling) and he's absolutely amazing.He does more with three strings than is believable. One of the youtube videos is called Balalaika Amok. If you have a few minutes check him out. There's also a great video of him doing Mozart's Turkish March with Tommy Emmanuel.


PS If you want to astonish people even more with the balalaika only having three strings explain that two of them are tuned the same....
EEA .....it is essentialy half a Ukulele.

Uke Republic
07-24-2015, 08:26 AM
There always seems to be the dismayed.
At our store we have lots of folks that walk in and are shocked how much variety there is in ukuleles and how nice they sound. Most are very nice and interested but on occasion you get the individual thats almost angry that these are not toys and no we don't really carry any other instruments. They sometimes leave telling us smug like " Good luck" and I retort gracefully that we have been in the business of ukuleles for over eight years. Who knows, someday they might come back in and become ukulele converts :)

k0k0peli
07-24-2015, 08:42 AM
Nobody insults my 'ukes or mandos. BUt I'm 6'4" / 190cm tall and otherwise rather imposing. I don't get mugged, either. ;) Sometimes I carry my 1994 Martin Backpacker guitar in its gig bag -- which looks rather like a shotgun case. Again, I get no snide comments, just casual sliding away. Maybe it's the machete at my belt...

kvehe
07-24-2015, 08:51 AM
Dingbats like the guitar tutor giving it large my immediate answer would be...especially if they are armed with a guitar...just point to the four strings, the DGBE at the Fifth fret and say " Well from there up the ukulele is all that , so how is that a limited range then ? More Challenging, arguably."

That is, pretty much, what I did tell him - more challenging.

Rllink
07-24-2015, 09:05 AM
When someone starts ragging on me about the ukulele I show them a youtube video of Jake or James Hill or any of the other masters and that usually shuts them up. One other video I show to my disbelievers is not Uke related but involves the Balalaika. The individuals name is Alexi Arkhipovsky (not sure on the spelling) and he's absolutely amazing.He does more with three strings than is believable. One of the youtube videos is called Balalaika Amok. If you have a few minutes check him out. There's also a great video of him doing Mozart's Turkish March with Tommy Emmanuel.
Question, what prompts people to rag on you about your ukulele so much so, and to the extent, that you are compelled to take them somewhere that they can see videos of famous ukulele players? Not trying to be a smart aleck, I'm just curious.

Dan Uke
07-24-2015, 10:57 AM
doesn't bother me. Stay calm and uke on.

MickeyD
07-24-2015, 11:16 AM
Anyone who plays a fish is going to be a bit odd.....




:biglaugh:

When I saw that comment I thought about these pictures, even though they aren't fish.

81789

Jeffelele
07-24-2015, 11:48 AM
Oh the humanity! (I've always wanted to say that. Thanks for giving me the shot.)

Jeff

coolkayaker1
07-24-2015, 12:47 PM
Typical reaction of a guitarist when first seeing Jake Shim.



http://youtu.be/oaW827jlC5w

Nickie
07-24-2015, 12:56 PM
Geez, Katheryn...
I'd rather quit and give him the finger, not a uke....

Hippie Dribble
07-24-2015, 02:05 PM
Geez, Katheryn...
I'd rather quit and give him the finger, not a uke....

Yep. Time for two new instructors.

Jim Hanks
07-24-2015, 02:06 PM
Anyone who plays a fish is going to be a bit odd.....

Fish? Whuh? Oh, oh, I see what you did there. CJ, you ain't right. ;)


Typical reaction of a guitarist first seeing Jake Shim.
Bwahahahahaha. Love it! :cool:

To OP, y'know, I guess Taylor's right - the hatuhs gonna hate, hate, hate

Ukulele Eddie
07-24-2015, 02:24 PM
@coolkayaker1, that video sums it up well!!!

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
07-24-2015, 03:51 PM
Great post. And this is why I don't, and never will, build guitars. Many guitarists seem to have an attitude. When a guitarist finds out I'm a luthier, or that I build ukes, their first question to me is "Do you build guitars" My proud response is "No, why would I ever want to do that? I build ukuleles!"

Ukulele Eddie
07-24-2015, 03:57 PM
I "expect" my non-musical friends to scoff and so I just enjoy a good laugh with them as we joke about my tip-toeing through the tulips. I usually send them an email with links to Jake, Kalei, Daniel Ho, Eddie Vedder, etc. and they're blown away by the versatility. It's never my mission, but I've actually "converted" a few people to the Church of Four Strings.

However, when I talk to a musician, if they scoff, I assume they're simply ignorant. The best musicians I know respect/appreciate any form of music, even if you're banging on an empty bucket. Lastly, to any rock guitarist who scoffs, simply tell them to take it up with Eddie Vedder. ;-)

k0k0peli
07-24-2015, 04:29 PM
Lastly, to any rock guitarist who scoffs, simply tell them to take it up with Eddie Vedder. ;-) No relation to Ukulele Eddie, of course.

Papa Bear
07-24-2015, 05:05 PM
I understand the comment about changing strings. That comes from a big box music store where most of the ukes they carry sound like cardboard. A lot of those so called uke teachers are really guitarists that don't have a clue about what can be done on a uke in terms of finger picking and creative arrangements.

UkeInTW
07-24-2015, 05:49 PM
Hmmm.... by the logic of one of the comments on the number of strings, then one should be able to learn the Shamisen in no time flat.
81799

peanuts56
07-24-2015, 05:55 PM
Question, what prompts people to rag on you about your ukulele so much so, and to the extent, that you are compelled to take them somewhere that they can see videos of famous ukulele players? Not trying to be a smart aleck, I'm just curious.
Ragging may have been the wrong choice of words. Being a baby boomer I get the Tiny Tim jokes and am asked if I can play Tip Toe Through The Tulips or Aloha Oe. I guess people have a preconceived notion about our choice of instrument. I usually take out my phone and show them Jake , James, Aldrine etc.

DownUpDave
07-25-2015, 01:28 AM
That was a rough few encounters for you Kathryn, not nice and not fun. When others discount what we do they are not only ignorant they are stupid. "Studid is as stupid does".

You just can't reason with stupid.

kvehe
07-25-2015, 01:56 AM
Well, in each case my actual response was more like eye-rolling, but having the three encounters so close together intensified them. I am definitely starting to re-think the uke lessons, though. That was the response that surprised me the most, especially because while I don't take my LFdM out to the lessons, I'm not taking a $30 ukulele-shaped object.

k0k0peli
07-25-2015, 03:02 AM
On Wednesday, my uke instructor (the uke instructor!) told me that you don't have to ever change strings on a uke because no matter what you do, they always sound dead. At least he's not a shill for stringmakers. ;) Or maybe he was implying that you need a resonator or banjo-uke? I could string my Varsity BU with wet noodles and it would still sound bright.

But the meme is "ukes don't get no respect" and I'll extend that to mandodlins too, and small lutes in general. Size *IS* important, at least to public perception. The guy with a baritone sax gets noticed and the fife and piccolo blowers don't. Guitars (especially dreadnoughts) are obvious and soprano 'ukes aren't. I never play a 10-hole harmonica in public, only a big chromatic or echo harp, because the big guy looks more like an instrument and less like a toy.

Chihuahua dogs, and luthier 'ukes, and piccolos, are easy to sneer at. If only they knew...

kvehe
07-25-2015, 03:49 AM
Chihuahua dogs, and luthier 'ukes, and piccolos, are easy to sneer at. If only they knew...

Re the dogs: true. My 95-pound Lab was attacked by a dachshund last weekend. She paid no attention to him.

tbeltrans
07-25-2015, 06:45 AM
After reading this forum as well as a piano forum and a guitar forum, one thing I find consistently here is the level of defensiveness about the instrument of choice here. Is it really necessary to expose ourselves ridicule, now that we know that is a likely response to our instrument? Is it really necessary to evangelize about the ukulele? In the end, does it really matter what other people think? If we choose to play the ukulele, that is our choice. Why let other people influence that. What really matters is that we enjoy what we are doing, whether other people enjoy it or not.

Tony

philpot
07-25-2015, 06:59 AM
After reading this forum as well as a piano forum and a guitar forum, one thing I find consistently here is the level of defensiveness about the instrument of choice here. Is it really necessary to expose ourselves ridicule, now that we know that is a likely response to our instrument? Is it really necessary to evangelize about the ukulele? In the end, does it really matter what other people think? If we choose to play the ukulele, that is our choice. Why let other people influence that. What really matters is that we enjoy what we are doing, whether other people enjoy it or not.

Tony

I think the difference is that no one actively makes fun of you for playing guitar or piano, so yeah, that tends to make us a bit defensive. We should temper it sometimes, but it's not without good reason.

tbeltrans
07-25-2015, 07:11 AM
I think the difference is that no one actively makes fun of you for playing guitar or piano, so yeah, that tends to make us a bit defensive. We should temper it sometimes, but it's not without good reason.

Then, rather than getting defensive, turn it into something positive - a strong motivation to become so good at playing the ukulele that there is no need to apologize or evangelize instead of having to show such people, real players who are so good that their performance "justifies" one's playing of the ukulele. With focus and caring, it can be done. I doubt that one must be another Jake, but turning in a good strong performance would do just as well, showing that YOU respect the instrument enough to take it seriously.

Tony

philpot
07-25-2015, 07:50 AM
Then, rather than getting defensive, turn it into something positive - a strong motivation to become so good at playing the ukulele that there is no need to apologize or evangelize instead of having to show such people, real players who are so good that their performance "justifies" one's playing of the ukulele. With focus and caring, it can be done. I doubt that one must be another Jake, but turning in a good strong performance would do just as well, showing that YOU respect the instrument enough to take it seriously.

Tony

Pretty sure that's what most of us do :)

Booli
07-25-2015, 08:16 AM
I find that there is a wide gap between a person being 'simply ignorant' and someone who comes across as 'maliciously ignorant'.

The difference to my perception is their attitude. The 'simply ignorant' asks innocent questions and might learn something, but the 'maliciously ignorant' person seems to have an agenda of ridicule, and no matter what you do or say in response, they always seem to follow up with some form of insult.

Both of those teachers would piss me off and be fired post-haste for they would not meet my personal standard of what I consider a 'musician', never mind a teacher (with an open mind).

When random folks might talk to me about the ukulele, I ask a few qualifying questions to see if their intent is pure, or that of ridicule.

If ridicule, then I simply walk away while they rant in the negative, as they're not worth my time, but if genuinely curious about the ukulele, as per what other folks have said in this thread here, I will go above and beyond to share some of the videos of amazing players and show them the possibilities. What happens next is up to them.

As a lifelong guitar player, prior to playing ukulele, I was aware of MANY fellow guitar players that were 'guitarded' (Freebird, Smoke On The Water, Stairway to Heaven being the ONLY 3 songs they could play, and only about the first 4-8 bars of each) that chided me for exploring jazz and going beyond the 1/5 2-finger 'power chords'. I find that those same kinds of folks are 'maliciously ignorant' of everything that is foreign to them, and actively seek to ridicule those with such interests.

It is far too common that some folks can only feel better about themselves by making other folks feel bad by imparting snide remarks, jabs and insults borne out of such 'malicious ignorance'. Sometimes I feel very sad for humanity.

Thankfully UU is full of fellowship and open-minded thinking amongst our members here.

While I may not always want to listen to other instruments, or all styles of music, I always try to offer some respect to those playing/performing, and would never ridicule another unless provoked and forced to defend myself.

Even in that case, I would first try to offer constructive criticism, but I am not the ultimate authority and would never want to rain on someone else's parade.

This thread make me both angry and sad, primarily that this kind of behavior keeps happening all over, all the time.

Why are people so mean to each other? Is it a form of mental illness?

tbeltrans
07-25-2015, 08:42 AM
Pretty sure that's what most of us do :)

I am sure that is true. I just felt it should be said to try to bring some positive aspect to this thread. I think Booli has some really good ideas in his post too.

Tony

pritch
07-25-2015, 01:31 PM
I was at the opticians recently being tested for a new pair of glasses with "occupational" lenses. The ones that let you see for close work but also let you read a computer screen - or what's on the music stand.
"What instrument to you play?"
"Ukulele."
She looked particularly unimpressed. At least she didn't say so.

There was a new player turned up at the ukulele group I usually play with and it quickly became apparent that she knew more than me which I found just a bit discouraging. I mentioned this to her friend who told me not to worry, the lady in question is a violinist. Last week I noticed that another newer member is no stranger to a piano keyboard. It's pleasing that these people are open minded enough to take up ukulele.

CeeJay
07-25-2015, 02:00 PM
Fish? Whuh? Oh, oh, I see what you did there. CJ, you ain't right. ;)





It has been remarked upon before, Jim ,it has been remarked upon before :D

CeeJay
07-25-2015, 02:02 PM
A lot of those so called uke teachers are really guitarists that don't have a clue about what can be done on a uke in terms of finger picking and creative arrangements.

Amen,Brother ,Amen.

hollisdwyer
07-25-2015, 04:25 PM
Nobody insults my 'ukes or mandos. BUt I'm 6'4" / 190cm tall and otherwise rather imposing. I don't get mugged, either. ;) Sometimes I carry my 1994 Martin Backpacker guitar in its gig bag -- which looks rather like a shotgun case. Again, I get no snide comments, just casual sliding away. Maybe it's the machete at my belt...
Love this, sooo funny.

hollisdwyer
07-25-2015, 04:47 PM
I've just got... no words about the first two points*, but after almost 6 years, I get the "still taking lessons" comment quite a lot. And I never quite know how to answer it other than a comment along the lines of "it's fairly easy to learn to play and fairly hard to learn to play well, and - I'm only interested in the latter."
I recently heard your feelings about this put another way: "All worthwhile things in life should be easy to learn but hard to master". Like you, I strive for the latter.

When I bought my first Ukulele, I really was surprised by the snobby comments of so many of my guitar playing friends (I still play the guitar and the Appalachian Dulcimer). That has never deterred me as I soon made so many great new ukulele playing friends who have enriched my life to no end. This includes the very generous and helpful people that I have met on UU. I am very grateful to those who have offered their friendship and so much more.
Beside the pure enjoyment I get from playing the uke, which is so much more accessible than my other instruments, I consider myself extremely fortunate that I made what seemed to be a very odd decision back then and purchased my first uke.

rappsy
07-25-2015, 05:27 PM
There always seems to be the dismayed.
At our store we have lots of folks that walk in and are shocked how much variety there is in ukuleles and how nice they sound. Most are very nice and interested but on occasion you get the individual thats almost angry that these are not toys and no we don't really carry any other instruments. They sometimes leave telling us smug like " Good luck" and I retort gracefully that we have been in the business of ukuleles for over eight years. Who knows, someday they might come back in and become ukulele converts :)

I know exactly what you are talking about Mike. I am in the costume business with a 41 year old year round business. I get get asked all the time: "What do you do the rest of the year?". It became so much that I had a sign printed which tells people all the things that we can do for them all year round. It's fun watching their expression, as you can see the realization come to their face that that they are NOT the first person to have asked this question.

No point in arguing. The more you deal with people, the less surprised you get with the questions and the reactions. JUST PLAY ALONG.

Booli
07-25-2015, 05:45 PM
Nobody insults my 'ukes or mandos. BUt I'm 6'4" / 190cm tall and otherwise rather imposing. I don't get mugged, either. ;) Sometimes I carry my 1994 Martin Backpacker guitar in its gig bag -- which looks rather like a shotgun case. Again, I get no snide comments, just casual sliding away. Maybe it's the machete at my belt...

Is that a machete, as in metal blade, or machete as in Portuguese 4-string ancestor of the ukulele? If the latter, I would love some kind of belt-holder/holster for a sopranino, then I could literally have a uke on me at ALL times.

The metal blade type machete might be useful for dealing with those folks with persistent 'malicious ignorance' in a few different creative ways Ha Ha, not that I would explicitly advocate any acts of violence or anything...LOL :)

k0k0peli
07-25-2015, 06:18 PM
Is that a machete, as in metal blade, or machete as in Portuguese 4-string ancestor of the ukulele? If the latter, I would love some kind of belt-holder/holster for a sopranino, then I could literally have a uke on me at ALL times. "Is that a sopranino in your pocket or are you just glad to see me?" ;) I actually am thinking of building this folding soprano 'uke kit (http://www.instructables.com/id/Constructing-the-Laser-cut-folding-ukulele/) that collapses into a lump about 9x5x2 inches. That'll fit into a cargo pocket, no problem. But I'd put Aquila Fifths strings on it and tune it like a mando. Then I could play my GDAD version of APACHE any time, any place. Well, maybe I'd need another one tuned gCEg for some slack-key favorites. That's OK, I have two pockets.

janeray1940
07-25-2015, 07:06 PM
"All worthwhile things in life should be easy to learn but hard to master"

Love this!

Teek
07-31-2015, 09:36 AM
I had a few professional guitar players in the family. Years back when I was first interested in ukes the youngest was over and I showed him my 3 or 4 ukes at the time. He was unimpressed until I said "Well just try one". He liked the Kamaka concert but I'm sure it felt really cramped, so I handed him the vintage baritone. I explained the scale and because it was the same as the top 4 strings of a guitar up a 5th he started noodling on it right away, fell in love, and wanted to borrow it for recording... :)

So each to their own but general open mindedness is a good thing.

kvehe
07-31-2015, 10:48 AM
Here's an update:

I took my Pono cedar/rosewood slot-head tenor (low-G Worth Browns) to my guitar lesson on Wednesday. The instructor nearly lost his mind: "What *is* this? I've never seen anything like this before. What kind of strings are these? Wow, this is really nice." etc. etc. He then proceeded to "teach me" C, F, and G, and show me how to strum Twinkle Twinkle Little Star. After the lesson, I went to the shop portion of the establishment because I wanted them to install a strap button. Four more guys there lost their minds - same deal - "What **is** this? Is that a cedar top??? Is that rosewood??? Hey, Tom, you have to see this! What kind of strings are these? Who knew a uke could sound like this?" etc. etc. They said they could install the strap button while I waited, so I wandered over to their uke wall and started tuning them (you're welcome). I even played educator, explaining ukes to a boy (maybe 8 or 9 yr old), who was looking at an orange Dolphin, but then became entranced by a blue Shark.

Up until about 18 months ago, under the original ownership, the store had a little stand holding a few Kalas. The shop was sold, and the new owners expanded the offerings, so there's now a wall of ukes, but as far as I can tell, nothing high-end. It's possible (but unlikely, I think, given the reaction to the Pono) that there are some in the room with the acoustic guitars and mandolins, but I was in a hurry to get to the uke lesson and didn't check it out. I'll look more carefully this week.

DownUpDave
07-31-2015, 11:52 AM
Kathryn that is an excellent addition to the first episode of the story.:-)I love the part when your guitar teacher was showing you how to form a C F & G chords, cracked me up :biglaugh: Then you taking the time with the young boy, very nice touch. A high quality instrument can change a lot of minds quickly

I had a similar experience when I brought my Mya Moe into a large high end music store to have a pick up installed. The techs were really impressed that the uke came in such a nice hard case, "Only seen them come in nylon gig bags" the guy said, :confused: I then open the case and two of the guys got all big eyed, then I played something and they got really interested. Said they had never heard a uke sound so good. I handed to one guy and he noodled around.......big smiles

Guess it just takes some educating although they do carry Kamaka and Kanile'a. They probably have never bothered to strum one.

uke-garou
07-31-2015, 05:21 PM
Weird responses from music people.
Anyway, people who have degrees in music take lessons for years. Sometimes they start as youngsters and continue until they graduate. My response would be, "You never stop learning."

I guess you thought you awakened in a parallel universe where nobody understands music.