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View Full Version : For those that mix single wound low g strings with high g string sets...



Recstar24
07-26-2015, 06:30 AM
What do you do with all of those extra high g strings? For example, I am going to mix some worth clears with a Fremont soloists wound low g...what do you do with the extra high g string?

Save it as a backup?

Can they be used as a strings?

Use it as fishing line?

Dental floss?

hollisdwyer
07-26-2015, 09:13 AM
Save it in the case and give it away when one of the people I play with breaks their high g.

wayfarer75
07-26-2015, 09:15 AM
I saved a couple for emergencies. I've screwed up string changes in the past and ruined strings in the process. So I have a few incomplete sets anyway.

DownUpDave
07-26-2015, 09:28 AM
I use it to set up the high wire act in my trained flea circus. They like florocarbon better than nylon.

janeray1940
07-26-2015, 09:41 AM
I mostly use them to replace my A strings when they wear out - for some reason the intonation on my A tends to go off long before the other strings wear out. The diameter of my strings of choice (Martin fluoros) on the A and G is really close, so it works great.

Recstar24
07-26-2015, 09:54 AM
I mostly use them to replace my A strings when they wear out - for some reason the intonation on my A tends to go off long before the other strings wear out. The diameter of my strings of choice (Martin fluoros) on the A and G is really close, so it works great.

That is what I was thinking, glad to hear at least one confirmed case of using extra g strings to replace a strings. I have had the same issue with fluorocarbon a strings in general, their thinness tends to wear them out faster. I have actually had a couple of a strings start to fray on me within the first week of playing - a worth clear A string frayed on me once within a week or so, and 2 A strings from 2 different SC sets on 2 different instruments frayed on me within the 1st week. Good to know that I can just pop in an extra g string as long as the diameters are pretty close.

TheCraftedCow
07-27-2015, 05:00 AM
Both G and A are interchangeable. So, if you are tuned reentrant, you can use an A string to replace the high G Here is an additional though of transposing "extra" strings. If you have an extra LOW G, move it over to the A slot so you have gCEa. Check out Dirk's cuatro tuning at Southcoast Strings. It makes a whole 'nuther world. It could also be placed along side of the A string as a double A A and tuned like a Balalaika or a mountain dulcimer. They also work well as a ramrod for cleaning the wax out of my hearing aid tubes. :~)

Rakelele
07-27-2015, 05:10 AM
Yep, what Janeray and the Crafted Cow said. On many sets, the A and G strings are close enough to replace a broken A string with that extra G string. This comes in handy since the A string is usually the first to break or fray.

Fleacia
07-27-2015, 10:40 AM
I save the extra strings. I've given them away (sometimes if I've sold a uke and other times just the strings). Have also used them to test other tunings. Sometimes it works and sometimes not, but either way it's not a waste. Once my son cut the E string by mistake when clipping ends, so I used an extra high G to replace it. I didn't like the lower tension, but he didn't mind it.

k0k0peli
08-01-2015, 05:54 AM
Both G and A are interchangeable. So, if you are tuned reentrant, you can use an A string to replace the high G And vice-versa, depending on what breaks or wears.


Here is an additional though of transposing "extra" strings. If you have an extra LOW G, move it over to the A slot so you have gCEa. Check out Dirk's cuatro tuning at Southcoast Strings. It makes a whole 'nuther world. I think that the Venezuelan cuatro tuning would be noted GceA -- the first and 4th are lower than the middle strings. (A set of V.cuatro strings for baritone should hit my mailbox Real Soon Now.)


It could also be placed along side of the A string as a double A A and tuned like a Balalaika or a mountain dulcimer. That's what I'll do with a Russian mandolin I'm gluing right now, string it as a balalaika (bala-don't-laika?) or chromatic MD. The neck on even a soprano 'uke is a bit wide to setup as a dulcitar or bala-uka but that could still work, depending on one's hand size, and on the uke's fret count. It's kind of hard to do much dulcimer stuff with frets going only to the octave like the Seagull Merlin. My 18-fret (1.5 octave) concert would be a better candidate for dulcimerization. But if one collects enough g-strings, an extra 'uke could be strung gggg for odd effects.


They also work well as a ramrod for cleaning the wax out of my hearing aid tubes. :~) What? I can't hear you. [/me needs new ears]

hollisdwyer
08-01-2015, 07:44 AM
Just a quick comment/observation about fraying strings. The only problem I have ever had on any Uke that I own or have owned has been on my Mya Moe 6 string tenor(this is also my oldest being built in 2011 and originally commissioned by a professional singer/song writer that tours extensively). That Uke was particularly brutal on my wound strings but also to a lesser degree on the unwound ones. I recently had a pro instrument tech dress the frets and install a set of Southcoast strings. It's been over six months now and not one string has frayed or broken. Before my wound strings would sometimes only last a week or less.

janeray1940
08-01-2015, 10:14 AM
Just to clarify - my post about the A string wearing out wasn't specific to breaking or fraying (I've actually never had either happen). I find that with the Martin fluoro strings that I prefer, the intonation starts to go off on the A string, especially higher up the neck, long before any of the other strings show signs of fatigue. Not something one would necessarily notice if they don't play up the neck or if they don't play with others, but when you do, it's pretty jarring, so those extra G strings are good to have on hand!