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Purdy Bear
08-07-2015, 04:03 AM
I have a few thoughts and questions on this:

Do any of you have a spiritual connection to your Ukulele? Do you think your Ukes have a spirit, or energy of their own?

Is there anyone who uses their Ukulele practice/music as a meditation?

Here's a Ukulele based meditation music video from Jonathen Lewis on You Tube:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qBrFWKA45xs

For me is yes to the first two questions and I want to, to the third. I feel all items that are made have the essence of the maker in them, and this is passed on to the user in a way. It's like building a friendship with the instrument as you learn to play.

I've been told a lot of composers get their music in dreams, I presume it would be the same with Ukulele players. It hasn't happened to me yet, but I can't see why it wouldn't. I certainly did with the flute some years ago.

This isn't a religious thing, more like a respect for the instrument.

Dwjkerr
08-07-2015, 04:41 AM
Sorry, but i have a problem thinking that my ukulele has a spirit, or that there might be a spiritual connection between me and it. It probably being a mass produced product.

However I do believe that a ukulele, as well as any instrument, can be used as an aid to meditation. Thought I have not done so..yet.

I do have the idea that a sot of relationship can be formed between a player and a custom built ukulele, but that would grow from the communication between the player and the maker.

janeray1940
08-07-2015, 04:57 AM
Really interesting questions!

As a yoga practitioner and Zen Buddhist, I definitely see similarities of "being in the moment" (to use a much-overplayed cliche) to meditation when really caught up in playing. I've even heard non-meditator, non-spiritual players say that, so I think it can be pretty powerful.

That being said though, I see my ukes as inanimate objects; even when I owned a custom that was built especially for me, there was no particular connection to it beyond enjoying playing - no essence of the maker, no higher ability. I actually have bonded far more with my anonymously-made factory Kamakas than I did with the custom (which I no longer own).

k0k0peli
08-07-2015, 07:26 AM
As I mentioned elsewhere, I don't see our "expensive kindling with strings" as being inhabited by spirit or spirits. If a talented maker is a horrible abusive wretch in their personal life, I'm sure happy their products are not haunted. I love the feel and play and sound of my luthier-crafted Celtic mandolin born from three months of detailed work but I get just as much joy with my cheap Chinese and Chicago factory ff-hole A-type mandos pressed out by the hour. Each has their own acoustics. Any 'spirit' in an instrument derives from how I push and pick the strings.

Yes, my ancient Martin tiple (small USA factory ca.1920) sounds richer than my new Oscar Schmidt 8-string tenor 'uke (big China factory, 2015) downtuned to Bb. But of two acoustic 6-string guitars of similar vintage (ca.1990) the glossy Ibanez Performance (big Korea factory) sounds better than the satin Art et Lutherie (small Canada craftworks). I give them all my spirit or at least my experience by playing them as well as I can.

As for meditation: When I empty my mind and let my fingers flow across the strings automagically, it's best to be in open tuning. ;) Dulcimer is an excellent instrument for meditation. So are slack-key 'ukes and guitars. And they make it hard to fall asleep whilst meditating.

Fleacia
08-07-2015, 07:32 AM
I believe, and have experienced, a relationship with every instrument I've ever played. Sometimes good, sometimes bad, some were brief and others lasted years. But there is a relationship, even if you don't call it a spiritual one. Ss long as that instrument is in your hands, you're connected to it, if only physically.

Personally I do see the relationship is spiritual. But that's because I purposely make it that way. All the songs I write are the result of meditation practice and carry a spiritual meaning.

So yes, I have an energetic relationship with the ukulele. Before I realized this, I played, but didn't get as much enjoyment, centeredness, peace or fun out of it. But then, it's a lifestyle for me and not something I only apply to music.

YMMV. Play on!

Uk3player78
08-07-2015, 10:24 AM
Interesting question. This is right up my street however... as much as i love my ukes i do think they are more communicating my message rather than that of a builder or machine. They are dead wood or laminate. :)

I will say this tho, be it ukulele, guitar or any other instrument i feel a huge weight lifting off me when i play. A sense of well being. I do meditate but sure, maybe a circle of ukuleles around me to ward off bad spirits and the monkey brain may help. :)

mikelz777
08-07-2015, 11:09 AM
Do any of you have a spiritual connection to your Ukulele?

I am fond of them and I can totally relate to connecting or not connecting with an instrument but spiritual connection? No.

Do you think your Ukes have a spirit, or energy of their own?

No, I don't believe in any kind of personification of lifeless, inanimate objects. A ukulele can make sound that may move someone in a visceral way so that person may ascribe that as a spirit or energy but it is just a pleasing aural experience.

Is there anyone who uses their Ukulele practice/music as a meditation?

No. I'm not the meditating type.


Here's a Ukulele based meditation music video from Jonathen Lewis on You Tube:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qBrFWKA45xs

This I dig, it's very relaxing. Hearing it, I would have guessed it was some kind of Japanese instrument.

Olarte
08-07-2015, 12:13 PM
I have a personal connection with playing music as a whole and a particular appreciation for wood made items abs instruments.

What I find more conducive to self inquiry, mediation and relaxation is playing Native American Flutes. They have a unique sound that seems more connected to my breath and state of mind than any other instrument. You should check them out. High spirit flutes are reasonable prices and excellent quality.

Native American flutes are also great with ukulele and to play blues and jazz.

CeeJay
08-07-2015, 01:12 PM
Sorry, but i have a problem thinking that my ukulele has a spirit, or that there might be a spiritual connection between me and it. It probably being a mass produced product.




Hmmm...interesting theory ...there are those that might say the Human Race is mass produced as well.....en masse...massively ....

A connection to anything is a personal thing.....spirit ...well I don't believe in that sort of thing .

But I can get an affection for an object .....a favorite Tee shirt, instrument ..book...etc......and you often find that those who have imbibed enough spirit often form really close bonds...." Ahhhhhhhhh looove you mate .....I really (hic) do ...."


But now I am going to look at my little collection on top of the wardrobe and wonder ..Who am I gonna call ???


Sorry PB I am pulling your leg unfairly....:o

Ukejenny
08-07-2015, 01:24 PM
I think the spirit of any instrument, whether mass produced, hand made, ukulele, clarinet, flute.... and so on, the spirit of any instrument is the spirit that you put into it yourself when you play it. It is the performer's spirit using the instrument to express. That's how I feel about it, anyway.

k0k0peli
08-07-2015, 01:44 PM
Flutes are wind instruments, playing them may be not unlike doing the yoga breathing exercise. Interesting point. Paul Horn's INSIDE albums were certainly meditative. Do any conservatories teach winds as yoga?

turtledrum
08-07-2015, 02:50 PM
Yes, there is spirit for me. The wood comes from a tree that once lived, just as the poem once separated from its poet has its own "spirit." The wood has its own vibration, just as each of us does. When these vibrations meet, something unique transpires, which is why each instrument sounds different in a player's hands.

It has been said that how you do one thing is how you do everything. How "present" is the player when playing? In that inquiry lies the answer to how meditative the meeting was.

I know my response may seem out there. My answer is sincere.

Fleacia
08-07-2015, 02:55 PM
turtledrum, I get this. I really do. And agree 100%!

Fleacia
08-08-2015, 10:12 AM
I follow the meditation practice of Lawrance Freeman. You could sing the words and play along I suppose. But the idea is to be completely still, which is hard if you are playing an instrument. Keep it very simple for best results.
Music is as old as our species. Everyone has it. Some people have pushed if out of their life. Your brain does process the words, if you sing a religious song it will be spiritual. If you feel it is spiritual you are singing a religious song. But spiritual is just a suburb in the huge megalopolis that is music.
The wood is harvested from a tree. Laminate or solid. Unfortunately the tree is usually killed by the harvest, which is not so bad if ten seeds are planted, but usually they are not. The wood is stable because it is dead, it has been dried for a year or more to make sure. Any spirit or connection you feel is generated in your brain and beliefs, so it can be real to you.
If you want to write songs, they are in your brain waiting to come out. You don't need to cheat with drugs or make up spiritual beliefs to set them free, you just need to be yourself and relax. But, often you do need to put some hard work into learning some technical and mechanical stuff so you can give them a recognisable form. But if you use meditation, that is much safer than cheating with drugs.
Flutes are wind instruments, playing them may be not unlike doing the yoga breathing exercise.

With enough awareness, you can get out of your own way (and quiet your mind) enough to play an instrument *and* meditate. Case and point - Kenny Werner's book, "Effortless Mastery: Liberating the Master Musician Within." He advocates a step-by-step practice going from approaching the instrument in a relaxed manner and not making any sound, to practicing and performing while still in a relaxed/meditative frame of mind. It takes time, which is why many give up and say this meditation stuff is crap, or doesn't go with playing music. But for some, they are not separate, but form a cycle where musical practice enhances meditation and vice versa.

As for songwriting, I agree you need some basic musical skills and at least some observation of form, rhythm, etc. What I mean by "writing songs based on meditation" is using meditative experiences, rather than an emotional or physical event as songwriting material. There are many emotionally-oriented songs in this world, and there will always be more. Why should there not be spiritually-based songs as well?

Yes, there is breath involved in playing flutes. I find them meditative myself. But there is breath in singing, speaking, and living at all. No breath, no life... So while playing another instrument, are you still breathing? If so, then the same breathing focus could be brought into playing the uke if one chose.

Using meditation is not about cheating or a drug-altered state of mind. It's about returning to a natural, relaxed way of being and moving. We don't realize how tense we are, with or without instrument in hand, until we re-learn how to relax.

Rllink
08-08-2015, 10:34 AM
No, I don't have a spiritual connection to my ukulele. I'm not really a spiritual person by nature. I actually wish that I was more so, but I'm not. I don't really become attached to things. Second part of the question, not being real spiritual, I don't do a lot of meditation, so no, I don't meditate with my uke. However, I do find playing my uke to be relaxing. I often times play my uke to get myself unwound. In fact, sometimes I'm on a rampage, and my wife will say, "why don't you go play you ukulele, and calm down a little." So maybe, in a broad sense, someone might interpret that as spiritual, but I don't. I think it just takes my mind off of things.

Fleacia
08-08-2015, 10:55 AM
Stress relief. Plenty of benefits in that. :) I think many people play music for that reason - I know I have, and do.

k0k0peli
08-08-2015, 11:11 AM
Stress relief. Plenty of benefits in that. :) I think many people play music for that reason - I know I have, and do. And then there are hardcore musicians who work for quite the opposite, to induce substantial stress. The Toccata & Fugue in Dm attributed to JS Bach certainly doesn't reduce stress. Much high-power music is aimed at pumping us up, not cooling us down. It's the old Apollonian vs Dionysian dichotomy, calm order vs wild frenzy. I used to wear a HIGH ON STRESS button. That was when I was employed. I'm much calmer now. ;) Playing dulcimer helps. No wrong notes; no hu-hu. Ahhh...

IamNoMan
08-08-2015, 11:53 AM
Meditation, contemplation and reflection is part of my Activities of Daily Living. I don't do this based on a schedule or such but I do engage in this type of activity most every day and generally several times during the day.

I believe that religion and spirituality has the purpose of making one's daily tribulations easier to bear. Music making of all sorts does this for me. One way this works for me is with depression. I have chemical imbalances in my brain that induce this all to often. I deliberately started to use this depressed state to play the Blues this spring. It doesn't really help the depression but it makes for better Blues and as such this allows me use use a depressed state to some positive purpose.

When Iam working on a musical piece I select the instrument I use for its acoustical properties and experiment with different ukuleles to see what will give me the desired effect. Some pieces I will play on the the five string banjo because the ukulele just does not give me what Iam looking in that piece. I do know that the more an instrument is played the better it will sound, not talking about my abilities here. Whether these factors are due to some animus in the instrument is something I have never considered.

spongeuke
08-09-2015, 12:42 PM
One meditative aspect of my ukulele experience is a calming that begins when picking up the instrument. Starting with the first strum, the well known known warm up pattern and continuing onward. While some don't consider it meditative it is going to my "happy place".
Other playing can induce stress, such a performing (more so with a mike) or leading a ukulele group (cat herding), that has to be channeled into the moment with varying degrees of success.
When I imagine a uke-spirit it is when restoring a once prized or not so prized instrument back to a playing and visual presence. The thoughts arise when tap tuning the body, watching the wood structure reveal itself during french polishing, or the first note after the string is strung, about what music was played by who any how. Yes all this is a projection by myself as the only witness.
Were there and will there be other projectionists? It feels like spirit building.

#4horse
08-10-2015, 05:54 AM
Any activity -- no matter how mundane -- can be a meditation if approached in the right manner and with the right mindset. Sitting,walking, washing the dishes, sweeping the floor -- all have the potential for being a meditation. Playing a musical instrument can certainly be a form of meditation, but it's important to be clear about your objectives and purpose before you begin your practice. Musical meditation is about being fully present with your instrument, you're environment, yourself, and the sounds you and your instrument are producing.

Repeating the same scale, chord progression or single note for ten minutes could be an excellent meditation if you are completely tuned in (pun intended) to where you are and what you're doing. Playing a complicated piece can be meditative too, although it's easy to put the importance of mastery and quality of performance above that of meditation. When that occurs, you can get so side-tracked by frustration, self criticism, and perfectionism that you lose connection with the meditation. Good news is if you're aware that's occurring, you can shift back into a meditative state of mind. _/\_

Nickie
08-10-2015, 01:33 PM
"



Any activity -- no matter how mundane -- can be a meditation if approached in the right manner and with the right mindset. Sitting,walking, washing the dishes, sweeping the floor -- all have the potential for being a meditation. Playing a musical instrument can certainly be a form of meditation, but it's important to be clear about your objectives and purpose before you begin your practice. Musical meditation is about being fully present with your instrument, you're environment, yourself, and the sounds you and your instrument are producing. "

Well said....
I'm a happily professed atheist and existensionalist. I can't even spell it and I don't care! I believe that everything in the manifest world has "life" or life-force, if you will. It all vibrates, each with a special rhythm, according to its purpose and meaning to us. Tai Chi is the best form of meditation for me. I agree that the flute is the easiest instrument with which to meditate, and the didgeridoo is a close 2nd. The ukulele is a very happy instrument, and if happiness is your passion, that's your meditation, too.
I've put lots of hospice patients into a dream state with the uke. So I know firsthand that the uke can be a meditational thing!

k0k0peli
08-10-2015, 05:20 PM
How the Hell in a fried Hades Comet of molten self loathing can a Ukulele be a meditative and calming piece of wood when after the umpteenth time of successfully managing to fail to nail the piece of music that you are currently trying to get the notes of in something of a semblance of the right order to resemble the tune that you are trying to play with eyes bugging bloodpressure soaring you grip the damn thing by the neck and it becomes what it was originally .... a wooden club with which to bludgeon the next poor unsuspecting buffoon to walk into your practice area and just say the wrong thing
That's 'hot' meditation as opposed to the 'cool' meditation espoused in this thread. Take three Thorazines and call me next week.

Nickie
08-10-2015, 05:24 PM
Ceejay, you have such a way with words.....so laid back....


JK!

Purdy Bear
08-10-2015, 11:16 PM
The idea of a meditation is that you don't necessarily have to play a known piece, you just let your fingers go where they want to. You don't even have to make a tune at all.

Here's a piece by Medwyn Goodall, one of my favourite composers for meditation music:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ntStkbAL1ik

The Big Kahuna
08-10-2015, 11:53 PM
http://www.acsu.buffalo.edu/~cas7/if.jpg

Purdy Bear
08-12-2015, 06:16 AM
Go facepalm all the stress, strain, high blood pressure and illeness that goes with not relaxing properly :)


I did a meditation to the Ukulele today. It wasn't intentional. I had the metronome on the slowest setting, then closed my eyes to do my basic chords I learnt. Then a few minutes later I was in the 'state'. I've meditated for years, but never while playing an instrument. It was really nice, so I will definitely be doing that again.

Olarte
08-12-2015, 06:56 AM
You really should try a Native American flute (NAF) or any other instrument where you can't play any "wrong" notes Percussion instruments and the NAF flutes which are in a minor pentatonic scale are excellent for just playing and letting the music flow.

On a different kind of "mindfulness" I built these two NAF flutes this week. Mind you I can't cut a straight line. But being an avid NAF player I took my time and was able to make a Bo/walking staff flute in F#m and a smaller one in Fm. I also came up with a way to play the small flute in a vertical or horizontal position by changing the plug I came up with from a plastic pen.

They are both made out of pvc and cost less than $15 to make. They sound great, are in tune and I spent about 8 hours from start to finish over the last 3 days. I've sort of been in a meditative state of sorts as the flutes came took shape right down to the finished product and taking these photos as well as playing them.

I wi be posting some Uke and NAF videos soon.

82310

82311

82312

82313

82314

By the way if you decide to try out NAF flutes check out high spirits flutes they are awesome and reasonably priced.





Go facepalm all the stress, strain, high blood pressure and illeness that goes with not relaxing properly :)


I did a meditation to the Ukulele today. It wasn't intentional. I had the metronome on the slowest setting, then closed my eyes to do my basic chords I learnt. Then a few minutes later I was in the 'state'. I've meditated for years, but never while playing an instrument. It was really nice, so I will definitely be doing that again.

The Big Kahuna
08-12-2015, 07:52 AM
If a stringed instrument could somehow absorb whatever nonsensical woo you think floats around the builder, do production line factory instruments suffer from multiple personality disorder? If I go into a store and try out a uke while I'm in a bad mood (perhaps after reading this thread), do I impart my "negative energy" on the instrument? If not, how exactly is it decided from whom this spirit bollocks enters a lump of dead or dying organic matter?

Good god man, you're from England, not fecking California! Talk sense and pull your socks up!

k0k0peli
08-12-2015, 12:17 PM
If a stringed instrument could somehow absorb whatever nonsensical woo you think floats around the builder, do production line factory instruments suffer from multiple personality disorder? If I go into a store and try out a uke while I'm in a bad mood (perhaps after reading this thread), do I impart my "negative energy" on the instrument? If not, how exactly is it decided from whom this spirit bollocks enters a lump of dead or dying organic matter? I approached this up-thread, asking if an excellent luthier was a miserable abusive wretch in their personal life, would we really want to handle their demon-haunted output? Do we notice the vibes emanating from products of neo-nazis or slaves or snake-worshipers?


Good god man, you're from England, not fecking California! Talk sense and pull your socks up! Watch what yuh say 'bout California, pardner. :( Most of the wacko belief systems started elsewhere and when they got run out of town some came here and were tolerated if not accepted because we have more important matters to worry about. NewAge (rhymes with sewage) started in the UK as I recall. That memory-water and Mayan-end-of-the-world stuff came from France. Flying saucer cults are from elsewhere, too. And 'ukulele worship disn't start here. Try again.

Purdy Bear
08-12-2015, 08:41 PM
Olarte - I play the orchestral flute, but had to put it aside due to Asthma. I did find it was harder to get into the meditative zone because of the breath control needed for higher notes etc. It's not an easy instrument to play.





If a stringed instrument could somehow absorb whatever nonsensical woo you think floats around the builder, do production line factory instruments suffer from multiple personality disorder? If I go into a store and try out a uke while I'm in a bad mood (perhaps after reading this thread), do I impart my "negative energy" on the instrument? If not, how exactly is it decided from whom this spirit bollocks enters a lump of dead or dying organic matter?

Good god man, you're from England, not fecking California! Talk sense and pull your socks up!



I'm a lady and yes I'm from England. The practice of both meditation and feeling the energy of the instrument comes out of the orient and is many centuries old, it is NOT a 1960s hippy thing. I do believe the later is Shinto, but I may well be wrong. Meditation is a Martial Arts based practice connected to building self and spacial awareness, as well as an ancient spiritual practice. One section of knowledge predates the Egyptian Pharoahs. Another thing for the energy of an item is just basic physics really, because everything is made up of atoms etc.

Olarte
08-12-2015, 11:34 PM
The NAF is very very light on the breath. Noir is not at all like a regar flute. It requires very little air or breath contr and you can't play a wrong note since it's a pentatonic scale. Just saying...

pbagley
08-13-2015, 03:58 AM
Two thoughts :

First, I believe that instruments are capable of holding energy; perhaps not at the spiritual level, but energy none the less. Have you ever picked up an instrument you do not own, perhaps in a shop or lent you by someone, and you played something entirely new to you? I mean some musical phrase or even chord progression that you have never played before. I think that the energy was in the instrument, and you were there to release it, and you likely put some of your own energy back into the instrument as well. This may only be that each instrument produces a different set of overtones and harmonics with each note played, and your brain reacts to the complexity of of the tone in differing ways. Some instruments are dead to me and I cannot wait to put them down. Others sing and encourage me to play more and different things. Expense and place of origin may matter some, but I think skill of the maker, quality of the component parts, and even previous experience play a greater role. Sometimes even a new instrument will draw music from my very marginal and limited talent. This is why you will often find the more player wear an instrument wears the better it sounds. This will make sense to some. Of course it may all be in our heads.

And second - I'll second what Olarte said about High Spirits native American Flutes. We visited the Grand Canyon in 2002 or there abouts, and we left the park via the east entrance ending up at the trading post in Cameron. There I looked at the Native American Flutes and one of the sales people recommended the High Spirits. $100 seemed like a lot at the time. Our sales guy Tony said that anything less expensive would be a waste of my money and a future disappointment, and that there were more expensive flutes on display that were not as good. Tony turned out to be a guitarist in a cover band, I was a bassist in a cover band. I bought the High Spirits and have never regretted the decision. Some day I hope to run into Tony again and thank him.

AndrewKuker
08-13-2015, 04:52 AM
Tools are part of the artistic process and we appreciate them for it. Our main distinction from animals is our creative ability to make and use tools for survival and enjoyment.

You most likely have a connection with, and even have love for an inanimate object that you use. It can inspire you, or give you joy. You don’t even have to be open minded or remotely spiritual to acknowledge this. In fact, it’s most likely why you are even here reading this.

johnson430
08-13-2015, 06:13 AM
Do any of you have a spiritual connection to your Ukulele?

Yes. I have a mango tenor and anyone who knows Buddhism will understand the importance of the mango tree and spirituality.

Do you think your Ukes have a spirit, or energy of their own?

Energy, yes. Each pluck of the string is energy given forth into the universe.
Spirit, not so much. (Although the tree that my uke was made from had a spirit, of course)

Is there anyone who uses their Ukulele practice/music as a meditation?

Yes, Music is very therapeutic for me and I believe it can also be used in meditation and as a way to connect to others.

Anyone who studies world religions understands the importance of music, or more importantly, vibrations.
Think of the mantra, Gregorian chanting, the song of the shaman in ayahuasca and mushroom ceremonies.
Sound is vibration, vibration is all around us.

The nay-sayers in this post are merely ignorant of that important realization.
Although being ignorant of that fact doesn't mean that the vibrations do not have a direct influence on these people, they are just unaware of it.
Why else would they play the uke if they didn't enjoy the vibrations?

Johnson

k0k0peli
08-13-2015, 07:03 AM
Flutes etc: I have and play recorders, tinwhistles, flageolets, ocarinas, etc. My rich sister-in-law (she used to run a major financial firm) gave me a very expensive superbly-crafted NAF... that I don't play. Wrong size. (My hands prefer soprano to alto.) I'd earlier bought a simple turned-wood pentatonic flute for US$25 or so that is one of my constant travel companions. IMHO the provenance and materials of a NAF / pentatonic flute are less significant than whether it fits your hands, face, and posture. Yes, a finely-crafted flute feels nice. But does it sing for you? You might have to kiss many frogs before finding your prince(ss).

Spirit etc: The human brain is very good at pattern recognition. We see patterns whether they exist or not, like faces floating in clouds or burnt into toast. Perceived patterns connect us to the world. Yes, we certainly may feel spiritual linkage to objects, and ideas, and people, and whatever we closely associate with or that triggers our pattern-recognition engine. Do such connections have anything to do with external reality? ¿Quien sabe? Evidence there seems slim. But there was a slogan during my wasted youth: IF IT FEELS GOOD, DO IT. That's why I play music. It feels good. I do it. No hu-hu.

Rllink
08-13-2015, 07:33 AM
Well, we have arrived at the place where most of these threads go, everyone has their own definition of spirituality. I answered early on in a way that reflects my own use of the word, which is synonymous with worship. So from that definition, which to me is pretty narrow, I do not worship my ukulele. But if spiritual in the broad sense includes, relaxing, enjoying, inspired by, comforted in, therapeutic, and on and on, then yes, I will join those who find similar emotions through their uke. Because I do feel all those things. But I will deviate a bit, and say that it isn't just the ukulele that is doing it for me. I do not find peace, comfort, and joy in the presence of my ukulele alone. In fact, if it weren't for the songs that I sing along with my ukulele, I think that my ukulele experience would become little more than an idle occupation for my mind. So when we talk of spirituality in the broad sense, in that sense that all good emotions and accomplishments come from some sort of spirituality, I find them coming from my ukulele when I play it, not hidden within my ukulele alone.

Captain America
08-13-2015, 08:08 AM
Some of these things described as "spirituality" really come across more as "sensitivity" or even "let's pretend." I think it tells volumes about contemporary life that simple things, like uke playing, are felt so important---it means, to me, that we're mostly rushing about and chasing about all the time, with little peace in our lives. It's fun to pretend my uke was built for a higher meaning by its uke maker. I don't believe in pantheistic spirits here and there. God exists, for us and with us. Music can be an emotional thing in a number of ways, particularly when we value the music and are pleased we can participate in its creation as musicmakers.