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Piecomics
08-09-2015, 11:56 AM
Hi, I'm getting interested in playing around with looping, using my iPad. From what I can tell I need a microphone, and someway to connect the microphone jack to the iPad air. I was wondering if anybody has any experience with this, and can make any recommendations. Ideally nothing that is going to break the bank.

Thanks!

Jim Hanks
08-09-2015, 12:12 PM
Really depends on your goals. To get started you can even use the built-in mic . From there, you can get things like the Blue Mikey Digital that plugs right into the 30-pin jack (or whatever the equivalent is on the newer ones - I still have an "ancient" iPad 2 :-) ). These are generally $100 or less. And from there, the sky is the limit with mics and interfaces.

For apps, there's lot of loopers out there but hard to fault Loopy HD for features and ease of use.

Hms
08-09-2015, 11:12 PM
If you are going to spend that amount of money on a USB mic, then I would look towards spending a little more and look at getting a Zoom H2n digital recorder.
Works both as a USB mic and digital recorder. Has excellent mics and various recording options.
h

Martini
08-10-2015, 06:25 AM
If you want to connect a 3.5mm jack in an iPad to use it as mic, you can get a RØDE SC4. If you already have a 3.5mm jack mic it is a great and not too expensive solution. (:

thejumpingflea
08-10-2015, 06:38 AM
I do a lot of recording through my iPad. It's a great tool for an on the go recording set up. Garageband is a decent program too.

I highly recommend the Apogee MiC (http://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/MiC96K). It's got an incredible sound and I use it for nearly all of my videos. It connects through the lightening port or you can hook it up to your computer.

librainian
08-12-2015, 05:07 AM
I second the apogee MiC for great sound. The built in preamp and gain control really helps you dial in the perfect sound and it has connectors for any kind of iDevice you may have. It is mono however... FYI. i think Booli would third this microphone as well.



I do a lot of recording through my iPad. It's a great tool for an on the go recording set up. Garageband is a decent program too.

I highly recommend the Apogee MiC (http://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/MiC96K). It's got an incredible sound and I use it for nearly all of my videos. It connects through the lightening port or you can hook it up to your computer.

Booli
08-12-2015, 08:03 PM
I do a lot of recording through my iPad. It's a great tool for an on the go recording set up. Garageband is a decent program too.

I highly recommend the Apogee MiC (http://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/MiC96K). It's got an incredible sound and I use it for nearly all of my videos. It connects through the lightening port or you can hook it up to your computer.


I second the apogee MiC for great sound. The built in preamp and gain control really helps you dial in the perfect sound and it has connectors for any kind of iDevice you may have. It is mono however... FYI. i think Booli would third this microphone as well.

Ha Ha! YES.

The Apogee MIC is the simplest solution, while ALSO the best SOUNDING, and MOST versatile, that I've tried in the past 20+ yrs or so of trying to record on a computer in a DAW (Digital Audio Workstation) environment.

Back in Nov'14, as per a very kind and helpful recommendation from fellow UU brother Librainian, I took advantage of the Apogee Black Friday sale and bought both an Apogee MIC, and an Apogee JAM at a great discount.

They have replaced RACKS full of gear, and a 1/4 mile of cables that I had accumulated over the past 20+ yrs. My pro condenser mics have not been taken out once since then. Also for doing stereo mic setups (aka X/Y) there are several free software plugins that you can use to take your mono track and 'simulate' pretty accurately a stereo X/Y mic sound, which for a close-mic'd instrument is really just to give a bit of depth via Haas comb filtering and impulse response curves to simulate how the human ear perceives sound - ALL via a single cable - MUCH better for me than the 30 mins to setup all the gear otherwise before owning the Apogee...

My setup now takes like 3 mins:

1) take items out of carry case
2) clip mic holder to desk
3) attach Apogee MIC or Apogee JAM to holder
4) plug in cable
5) open software, check levels
6) hit record

Also, adding to what was said by our fellow UU member thejumpingflea:

IMHO, Garageband is both very powerful while simple to use.

You can start a project on iOS, and then later, via iTunes, bring that project over to your Mac, and then open it on Garageband on the Mac and continue to work on it and add polish, but sadly, I do not think that you can go from Mac OSX Garageband back to iOS Garageband after that...

Also, I can confirm that the Apogee products work with the older 30-pin iOS connector as well as the Lightning connector (new since the iPhone 4), and with the USB cable, I can confirm that both products work with Ardour, Jokosher, oCenaudio, and Audacity on Xubuntu Linux, and all programs that I've tried on Mac OSX and iOS (way to many to list), but I don't know first-hand if they work in Windows, since I'll never touch Windows again, but I read that some folks have tried them on Windows.

This wide compatibility is due to the hardware being USB-Audio 'Class-Compliant' which means it needs no drivers, and should work on basically any hardware/operating-system without issues.

I love the sound quality and ease of use of both the Apogee MIC and JAM. You cannot go wrong with an Apogee product. They are considered high-quality and high-end devices by many pros.

Every time I use mine, I am thankful :bowdown: to Librainian for sharing the info about the Black Friday sale.

I've noticed that on their site, Apogee sometimes has refurb models for sale at a discount, and the units I have were in fact refurbs, and they both have worked flawlessly for me.

Sweetwater Sound typically has a demo or 'open box' model for sale, with free shipping, and I've also had good luck buying gear from B & H Photo in NYC, which also has free shipping for MANY items and no tax if you are outside of NY.

TLDR; get an Apogee product!

coolkayaker1
08-12-2015, 10:45 PM
Piecomics, simple and won't break the bank idea, an idea that I love and that works phenomenally.

If you already own a uke with a pickup and an amp, it records wonderfully directly to your iPad Air. It's the simplest solution that I have found--pretty much a thirty-second set-up.

1) plug in uke to amp
2) turn on IPad
3) start recording.

Just a little experimentation with volume of amplifier and location of the Air relative to the speaker and you'll get nice, crisp recordings (once you know where to put the Air relative to the amp, and what amp volume, you just do the same thing every time).

JimHanks is right, the iPad Air mic (dual mics, I think) are truly fabulous; Apple has put a lot of thought into those tiny buggers. They just need a little zing for recording volume.

Won't break the bank, either (if you have the Uke w pickup and amp already, as many do; if not, a great excuse to buy more gear...lol).

Related: New iPads being announced Sept 9 by Apple.

BearMakingNoises
08-12-2015, 10:47 PM
I agree. The Apogee Mic is great. I use it with Focustire's Tape app for mobile recording.

Booli
08-13-2015, 01:51 PM
Sorry if this is slightly off-topic, but I thought it might help for your recording setup query...

I have just posted a video tutorial for how to simulate a live stereo sound from a mono recording, that uses my aforementioned Apogee MIC, and thought that you might like to hear the sound sample, as well as possibly see the software tutorial.

While this recording was not made on an iPad, but WAS MADE with the Apogee MIC attached to a desktop computer, running Linux, and then recorded into the free audio program Audacity, the sound quality is still excellent, however YouTube has mangled it a little, but this should give you an idea.

It is here:

http://forum.ukuleleunderground.com/showthread.php?109516-Audio-Tutorial-1-Howto-EASY-simulated-stereo-from-a-mono-audio-file

drmosser
08-14-2015, 09:27 AM
[...]
Also, I can confirm that the Apogee products work with the older 30-pin iOS connector as well as the Lightning connector (new since the iPhone 4), and with the USB cable, I can confirm that both products work with Ardour, Jokosher, oCenaudio, and Audacity on Xubuntu Linux, and all programs that I've tried on Mac OSX and iOS (way to many to list), but I don't know first-hand if they work in Windows, since I'll never touch Windows again, but I read that some folks have tried them on Windows.

This wide compatibility is due to the hardware being USB-Audio 'Class-Compliant' which means it needs no drivers, and should work on basically any hardware/operating-system without issues.[...]


Booli, thanks for the info regarding the Apogee Jam and Linux. I'm a Linux user who also uses an iPad and iPhone. It's nice to have some confirmation that these Apogee devices will work well with both operating systems (Linux and iOS).

I've got several ukes now with nice pickups and it would be more convenient to record into a smaller device like the iPad or iPhone rather than the USB recording interface attached to my desktop computer.

Recstar24
08-14-2015, 11:13 AM
For those of you recording with ukes that have pickups, are you playing from your amp into an external mic, or is there a way to plug directly from pickup into an iPad or desktop?

coolkayaker1
08-14-2015, 12:20 PM
For those of you recording with ukes that have pickups, are you playing from your amp into an external mic, or is there a way to plug directly from pickup into an iPad or desktop?

For me, directly from amplifier, through the air, into my iPad microphone.

librainian
08-14-2015, 08:59 PM
For those of you recording with ukes that have pickups, are you playing from your amp into an external mic, or is there a way to plug directly from pickup into an iPad or desktop?

As Booli mentioned, Apogee makes an excellent direct interface called the Jam (or Jam96k) which allows you to directly connect your instrument pickup to whatever software you choose. There are other similar interfaces for iPad, but I consider the Jam to be superior for sound quality and value. it has the same wide compatibility as the Apogee MiC we mentioned earlier.

I have tried it with Garage Band, LoopyHd, Jamup Pro, and other apps via Audiobus and it works great. I believe it offers the best value and widest compatibility compared to other similar interfaces.

Booli
08-14-2015, 11:24 PM
Booli, thanks for the info regarding the Apogee Jam and Linux. I'm a Linux user who also uses an iPad and iPhone. It's nice to have some confirmation that these Apogee devices will work well with both operating systems (Linux and iOS).

I've got several ukes now with nice pickups and it would be more convenient to record into a smaller device like the iPad or iPhone rather than the USB recording interface attached to my desktop computer.

No problem. :)

I have found via hands-on experience, and seen other folks confirm online that most USB audio devices that work with a Mac OSX will ALSO work with Linux, out of the box with no drivers, due to a USB standard called 'Class-Compliant'.

This might be a bit of a tangent to the original topic, but please indulge me this moment to geek-out...and provide a deeper explanation within my own experience...

'Class-Compliant' USB devices are part of the reference specification from the USB Foundation Standards Committee, for which I cant find the web site at the moment to provide a link.

I was a Windows (and DOS) user (since 1985) but switched to Mac OSX in 2005. (I have also worked in Microsoft-focused corporate IT environment since 1989 as a certified systems and network engineer, and since 2002 been implementing Linux and since 2005 implementing Mac OSX solutions where necessary/possible).

I have kept OSX for some music apps that I run on a Mac Mini, but am now using Xubuntu Linux on my main computer because Apple did not offer hardware that made sense to me at a reasonable price - (back in Dec'14, I built my own 8-core 3.5 ghz AMD-powered mid-tower system with 32GB of RAM and 4x 2TB hard drives for less than $900 [courtesy to newegg.com for some crazy sales]). Before anyone suggests it, not going back to Windows again. Microsoft is too evil for me.

The earliest versions of MAC OSX (circa 2000/1) , and Linux since (circa 2005) Class-Compliant USB drivers have been the default as various 'kernel extensions', that are included with the operating system.

This means that the hardware manufacturer can make a device that conforms to the spec and it will work as a generic device of the given type, and then they can offer their own regular software program to act as a 'controller' for any specific configurations to the device. The installation of said program is optional for the end user, but not required for basic functionality of said device.

BTW: This is in fact quite different from hardware 'drivers' and their control-interface within the driver itself (Mostly for Windows devices), but please keep in mind that the subtlety of this distinction is not readily apparent to the average computer user.

I switched my main desktop to Ubuntu (Xubuntu) Linux in Dec'14 and have been pleasantly surprised with how many devices still work on it that I used to use with Mac OSX.

Almost all 'Mac' USB devices work on Xubuntu, and only about half of the Firewire audio devices work due to the device having both hardware and software implementations being proprietary, the most disappointing is my Tascam 1804 interface, but I can still use it on OSX, so it's not a total loss. FYI- Firewire hard drives work fine though - 'Mass Storage' seems to be the most compatible common denominator across Mac, Windows and Linux systems.

Also to mention, the reason that many devices can work on both Mac OSX and your iOS device (i.e. iPhone/iPod/iPad) is because iOS also implements the USB 'Class-Compliant' reference spec in both the hardware and software implementation, which is great because you can use many devices that are USB with iOS, even if they are not listed as iOS-compatible, provided they are connected with either the 'Camera Connection Kit' (30-pin dock connector to female USB host adapter) or the Lightning to USB adapter, and your peripheral does not ask for more than 500mA of power from the iOS device, (then you need to use a powered USB hub, which can provide the juice for your peripheral - one such use-case is for the Blue Microphones YETI USB condenser mic, which WILL work with iOS only IF you use a USB hub to provide the power it requires).

Feel free to chastise me via PM if I've driven this thread off the rails, and for which I apologize in advance. :shaka:

Booli
08-14-2015, 11:39 PM
As Booli mentioned, Apogee makes an excellent direct interface called the Jam (or Jam96k) which allows you to directly connect your instrument pickup to whatever software you choose. There are other similar interfaces for iPad, but I consider the Jam to be superior for sound quality and value. it has the same wide compatibility as the Apogee MiC we mentioned earlier.

Yes, the 'original' Apogee Jam and newer Jam96k (which replaced it) both allow you to use a regular guitar cable to plug in your instrument, whether it be pickup-equipped ukulele, guitar, keyboard, or even a Theremin (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theremin) if you want...


I have tried it with Garage Band, LoopyHd, Jamup Pro, and other apps via Audiobus and it works great. I believe it offers the best value and widest compatibility compared to other similar interfaces.

as an aside:

I like LoopyHD a lot, but not sure how to use it effectively, but it's cool to play with...

If you like JamUP Pro, their app Final Touch is great for adding that extra polish when you are done with your project in GarageBand...and also there is an app called ToneStack that is similar and sounds great while being easy to use that I got on sale last month when they included all of the in-app purchases as a promo for only $10 for the whole shebang...(tried Amplitube and others but did not like them as much and removed them afterward)

Also, I've messing with JAMORIGIN's MIDI Guitar app ($19 iOS, $99 for OSX)) which works great with the Apogee JAM, and the app lets you control soft-synths via MIDI by whatever instrument you want, without requiring a special MIDI pickup ON that instrument. E.g., PLAY your ukulele, and have the SOUND of a violin or whatever you want - I only tested it with Garageband, but it outputs Core-MIDI so should work with other apps. I plan to test it with the Korg iM1, which is a software implementation of their legendary 1990's M1 synth.

Booli
08-14-2015, 11:47 PM
For me, directly from amplifier, through the air, into my iPad microphone.


The only problem with doing this is that if you have background noise such as a fan or A/C unit in the summer when it's 95 degrees and 55% humidity (yes, in NJ), that these sounds can interfere with getting a clean recording. Otherwise, the mics that are built-in to current and even previous iOS devices actually do a very nice job of recording your music with good fidelity to the original 'acoustic' sound.

If you don’t have to contend with background noise, you might be able to get by, or otherwise shut everything off and deal with the unpleasant heat and moisture. But keep in mind that mitigating background noise while recording is still a major issue, regardless of what kind of microphone you might use...

Also, I've even recorded a few live performances (yes, bootlegged, for my own personal use, shhh, don't tell anyone :)) with my 4th-gen iPod touch (and no add-on hardware) and was quite impressed with the results. Apple has definitely put some good engineering into these products.

VegasGeorge
08-15-2015, 02:39 AM
I really have no interest in becoming a recording engineer, but I would like to be able to record myself playing and singing, just for fun. So, based on the recommendations in this thread, I bought an Apogee mic. It's still in the box, but I'm hoping to get to it today. I'll be using it with my iPad Air 2. Since I'm an absolute beginner insofar as recording goes, I should be an interesting test case. I'll let you know how it goes.

Piecomics
08-15-2015, 02:59 AM
Thanks for the advice everyone. I think I'm going to just use the built-in mic for now, because I don't have the money for the Apogee and I don't like getting the wrong stuff. I have a godin amped, so as it goes through the air and it should be pretty good, other than my terrible playing :-) I guess my next question is, once I have something in Loopy that I'm interested in, it sounds like I should be going with GarageBand to continue to work with the recording?

Recstar24
08-15-2015, 02:09 PM
The apogee jam seems like a pretty decent deal to record from pickup directly into iPad, and you won't have to deal with background noise.

Recstar24
08-15-2015, 02:38 PM
Last question from me end - does it make more sense to just get an apogee one vs an apogee jam and mic?

Booli
08-15-2015, 08:10 PM
Last question from me end - does it make more sense to just get an apogee one vs an apogee jam and mic?

It depends - IIRC the Apogee One has an OMNI-directional mic, whereas the Apogee mic is a CARDIOID (aka mostly SINGLE-directional mic, sort of a heart-shape pickup pattern, hence the name CARDIOID, as in cardio or heart).

An omni mic element picks up sound with equal sensitivity for 360 degrees all around, whereas a cardioid mic pics up sound typically most sensitive solely in approximately 60 degree wide angle (think of a cone, with the point facing AWAY from you, and horizontal) from the front-facing area of the mic element and the wide mouth of the cone is where the mic is most sensitive to sound pressure... (FYI-some mics are side-facing too but still cardioid)

If you do not care about background noise entering your recording (which is basically ANYTHING that is not your instrument or voice) OR you have a soundproof room or closet you can hide in with your iPad and your uke, then go ahead :)...

An OMNI mic is typically more useful if you want to capture the sound of a group, like a quartet or a choir of like 10 or more singers, and with this method you do not need to have a mic on each singer/musician, but also you will be recording them all to a single track in your software, so there is no editing possible if one singer/musician is too loud or flubs the notes -- the only solution then is to to ANOTHER take and re-record it all over again since you do not have discrete tracks for each singer/musician...

I hesitated and asked this same question you posed here, but I have lots of problems with ambient noise (dogs barking, truck driving by, people in next room talking on the phone, etc) penetrating my recordings and cannot properly soundproof my recording space, so a cardioid mic is more useful to me in this regard, however, YMMV. :)

Booli
08-15-2015, 08:14 PM
I really have no interest in becoming a recording engineer, but I would like to be able to record myself playing and singing, just for fun. So, based on the recommendations in this thread, I bought an Apogee mic. It's still in the box, but I'm hoping to get to it today. I'll be using it with my iPad Air 2. Since I'm an absolute beginner insofar as recording goes, I should be an interesting test case. I'll let you know how it goes.

My bad. It seems that I have overwhelmed you with technical jargon in one of my previous posts to this thread.

I am truly sorry. Please accept my apology.

However, please do not confuse or misunderstand my description of my work history as an 'IT (read COMPUTER thingies) systems and network engineer' with an 'audio engineer', for they are two VASTLY different things and neither of which are required of anyone to plug a USB mic into your iOS device or computer and record yourself, and I would like to further apologize if I gave you that impression. :shaka:

Booli
08-15-2015, 08:16 PM
The apogee jam seems like a pretty decent deal to record from pickup directly into iPad, and you won't have to deal with background noise.


Yes, works very well for me! :)

Booli
08-15-2015, 08:21 PM
Thanks for the advice everyone. I think I'm going to just use the built-in mic for now, because I don't have the money for the Apogee and I don't like getting the wrong stuff. I have a godin amped, so as it goes through the air and it should be pretty good, other than my terrible playing :-) I guess my next question is, once I have something in Loopy that I'm interested in, it sounds like I should be going with GarageBand to continue to work with the recording?

You're most certainly welcome. Whatever works for you is the best thing to do (hey that RHYMES!!!) but now at least you have some insight as to what your options are, and you can always upgrade to a mic or other recording device later on, as I'm sure newer ones will be coming out all the time, with improvements as this kind of technology evolves and hopefully gets cheaper...

Rock On! :) :music:

Recstar24
08-16-2015, 02:32 AM
Thanks booli! I got a real education in this thread for sure and I very much appreciate it!

Recstar24
08-16-2015, 03:56 AM
Booli,

Please take a look at the new shure products that seem to compare with the apogee stuff. For others, this is just another option.

http://www.shure.com/americas/stories/motiv-digital-microphones

Dan Uke
08-19-2015, 06:14 AM
If you are going to spend that amount of money on a USB mic, then I would look towards spending a little more and look at getting a Zoom H2n digital recorder.
Works both as a USB mic and digital recorder. Has excellent mics and various recording options.
h

So how do you connect to the ipad?

Dan Uke
08-19-2015, 06:16 AM
Booli,

Please take a look at the new shure products that seem to compare with the apogee stuff. For others, this is just another option.

http://www.shure.com/americas/stories/motiv-digital-microphones

The Shure MV88 looks interesting as I'm looking for a better mic for my iphone. I am also looking at the Zoom IQ series (5, 6, 7).

Booli
08-19-2015, 07:26 AM
So how do you connect to the ipad?

Depending upon which connector your iOS device uses for charging & synching, you need one of these $29.00 adapters, which give you a USB port:

works with iPad ONLY:
http://www.apple.com/shop/product/MC531AM/A/apple-ipad-camera-connection-kit

OR

works with all devices:
http://www.apple.com/shop/product/MD821AM/A/lightning-to-usb-camera-adapter

Recstar24
08-20-2015, 12:20 PM
Here is a quick recording I did with the shure mv88:

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/qiwjfjjxmuftc8e/AABooXqy2xKHB0_C_u-SSzC6a?dl=0

https://app.box.com/s/jgxbr3frs2w2lx4dwwvntn5mj4qxldp1

Very easy to use, plugs directly into iPad. The shure MOTIV app allows you to adjust gain, and modify the stereo recording field. The mic appears to have a cardioid mic in front, and behind it is another microphone that can capture mid/side.

Recstar24
08-20-2015, 12:56 PM
Here's another one:

https://app.box.com/s/5408d76xu3f34jrewhaaggnl7iysmy6f

this time I recorded from within another app, it appears to retain the same quality of sound as saved under the shure app.

librainian
08-20-2015, 06:07 PM
Great info Booli! I will have to check out some of your other app recommendations. Using the Jam to drive synths via midi sounds intriguing.

I also have to agree that the cardoid pattern with the Apogee MiC vs the Apogee One is a better fit for me too. Even my old Zoom H2 had a tendency to pick up a lot more ambient noises around my house. Things like the compressor on my fridge or even wind outside my windows creeped in and the effect is amplified if I am mixing multiple tracks.

I simply love how clear I can get my voice and ukulele to sound with the MiC with very little or no extraneous noise - unless my Basset Hound Marvin decides to bark at something!

VegasGeorge
08-21-2015, 12:00 PM
So, if I plug my Apogee mic into my iPad and want to do a video recording of me playing, do I use the front facing, FaceTime lens on the iPad, or the rear lens, and get up and walk around the device every time I want to start/stop the recording?

Booli
08-21-2015, 12:31 PM
So, if I plug my Apogee mic into my iPad and want to do a video recording of me playing, do I use the front facing, FaceTime lens on the iPad, or the rear lens, and get up and walk around the device every time I want to start/stop the recording?

For convenience sake, and making sure I am in the frame and not looking evil, I use the Facetime camera and just suffer the horrors (LOL) of the lower video capture resolution (compared to the camera on the back). If you use the back camera, you cannot see yourself on the iPad screen unless you place a BIG mirror behind the iPad.

I have also found that if you want to use an external audio device with any of the iOS video recording apps, or any audio apps, it's best to plug in the device BEFORE launching the app, and then the app will default to using that for the audio capture, as opposed to one of the built-in mics on your iOS device.

FYI: If this is the first time using this specific external audio device on your iPad etc, iOS will ask you to grant permission for the app to use your 'microphone', and unless you say YES, you will have NO AUDIO recorded, and the only way to fix this is to go into the main iOS PRIVACY settings and set it to ALLOW for that app.

Also, I use the free app 'Movie Pro' because you can set the option to show you VU meters of the audio before AND while recording, so you can see how to set the level on the Apogee preamp so as to avoid clipping and distortion which is not always apparent when monitoring in your headphones.

Booli
08-21-2015, 12:40 PM
Here's another one:

https://app.box.com/s/5408d76xu3f34jrewhaaggnl7iysmy6f

this time I recorded from within another app, it appears to retain the same quality of sound as saved under the shure app.

In my experience with iOS recording devices, the audio quality seems to be, and SHOULD be dependent solely upon the hardware you use, regardless of what software you use to capture the sound. Also I do not think Apple has exposed signal processing API's publicly to developers for use during live audio capture, but many apps have EQ and effects to play with AFTER you have already recorded the audio.

So if you record 'dry' (no effects) in one app, and then do the same in another, the audio quality should be identical.

Thanks for sharing your Shure-based recording(s), which BTW sound GREAT!

Glad to see Shure finally step up to the plate, even if late to the game for digital audio devices.

Recstar24
08-21-2015, 02:16 PM
Thanks booli! Really happy with the ease of use and quality for sure.

VegasGeorge
08-22-2015, 02:07 AM
Booli, thanks for the great help! I had no idea about plugging the external mic in before launching the app, etc. One more question, if I might.

I have an iPhone 6 in addition to my iPad Air 2. Is there some way I can use the great camera on the iPhone in conjunction with my iPad? That way I could get the good resolution and see myself in the iPad while I record.

librainian
08-22-2015, 01:19 PM
Booli, thanks for the great help! I had no idea about plugging the external mic in before launching the app, etc. One more question, if I might.

I have an iPhone 6 in addition to my iPad Air 2. Is there some way I can use the great camera on the iPhone in conjunction with my iPad? That way I could get the good resolution and see myself in the iPad while I record.

Whatever app or gear you would use on the ipad will work on the iphone as well. You could record the video and audio on the iphone then dropbox it and mix and edit it on the ipad.

You could record video with your iPhone and audio on the ipad and then mix them together. It makes things more complicated and I don't see much benefit, but if you don't care about audio on the phone I have used the Optrix sport mount case which has a decent wide angle lens and lots of universal mounts for tripods etc.

http://www.amazon.com/Optrix-Wide-Angle-Sports-iPhone/dp/B00OYC733W

Pick the right model for your form factor and SHOP AROUND because the prices vary widely. I got mine on ebay for less than $30 with several mounts included. I had to buy the tripod mount separately.

Booli
08-22-2015, 02:17 PM
Booli, thanks for the great help! I had no idea about plugging the external mic in before launching the app, etc. One more question, if I might.

I have an iPhone 6 in addition to my iPad Air 2. Is there some way I can use the great camera on the iPhone in conjunction with my iPad? That way I could get the good resolution and see myself in the iPad while I record.

I'm not sure I fully understand the question. Do you want to somehow use the Facetime camera of one device (so you can see yourself and make sure you are in the frame) to 'record'/show show you the touchscreen of the other device (which will have your MiC attached and be THE actual audio/video recording you will use)?

OR

are you trying to do a recording using both devices from different angles? (if this is your objective you are opening a whole other can ff worms to synch the videos and for doing a 'multi-cam' edit, and will not be possible with iMove or Windows Movie maker, you'll need Adobe Premiere or Apple's Final Cut to do it properly)


Whatever app or gear you would use on the ipad will work on the iphone as well. You could record the video and audio on the iphone then dropbox it and mix and edit it on the ipad.

You could record video with your iPhone and audio on the ipad and then mix them together. It makes things more complicated and I don't see much benefit, but if you don't care about audio on the phone I have used the Optrix sport mount case which has a decent wide angle lens and lots of universal mounts for tripods etc.

http://www.amazon.com/Optrix-Wide-Angle-Sports-iPhone/dp/B00OYC733W

Pick the right model for your form factor and SHOP AROUND because the prices vary widely. I got mine on ebay for less than $30 with several mounts included. I had to buy the tripod mount separately.

If you want to do audio recording on one device and video recording on the other, you need to understand how to sync the clips in editing, which is also a big PITA and unless you want to spend all the extra time in editing to make this work, I'd just use a single device with some of the hardware add-ons like Libranian has mentioned.

The only exception to devices working on ALL iPad, iPhone and iPod Touch devices is based upon which charge/sync connector your device uses. If it is a newer device and uses the LIGHTNING connector and is running iOS 8.1 or later, then YES the device SHOULD work...

conversely the older devices that have the 30-pin connector ONLY the iPad will work with many external devices plugged into this port or via USB with the Camera Connection Kit (see link in one of my above posts) since Apple crippled the Core-USB driver's API for iPod Touch and iPhones that are older than the 5th-generation devices, and on those OLDER devices, (iPod Touch and iPhone) with the 30-pin doc connector, you cannot use many of these great audio peripherals UNLESS it specifically says it will work with them. Apple has received MANY MANY complaints about this and now since the Lightning connecter was implemented and since iOS version 7.1.2, they are using a unified driver for the docking port that is also the same exact hardware whether it be an iPad or other newer device.

FYI, and as an example, I've done multi-cam videos before, using an iPhone 2G, and iPad-3 and an iPod touch (4th-gen), all simultaneously recording me, but from THREE different angles (and three different video capture resolutions due to them having completely different camera modules in each) , and then combined them using iMovie, with much frustration and 5x more time investment than originally expected. I eventually ended up just doing a picture-in-picture-in-picture kind of thing.

One such example can be seen in this video I made very early on in my uke efforts for one my first entries for one of the Seasons contests:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BWLTmTAh8Z0
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BWLTmTAh8Z0

That uke is a Kala KA-T tenor that has a Mi-Si pickup that I installed myself and is then going into the headphone jack of the iPad-3 via the Peavey AMPKIT Link, which was the only iOS audio interface I had at that time.

The iPhone 2G recorded video only if it was jailbroken and using Saurik's Cycorder app, and at a low 320x240 resolution which I had to upscale to 640x480 using Handbrake, and the iPod Touch captures video with the built-in camera app on the Facetime camera at 640x480, as does the Facetime camera on the iPad-3.

I had to make my iMove project 1280x720 resolution and iMovie automatically upscaled the video clips upon import to match that resolution, and then when I exported/rendered it all and uploaded it to YouTube, then YouTube got to mangle it and make it look all fuzzy as you can see in the video.

I've been at this video thing since the 90's and have lots of experience with encoding video and so far, no matter how I encode video on Windows, Mac or Linux, and no matter what settings I use, YouTube always degrades the visual quality during their 'processing' after upload. :(

If I am on the wrong track, VegasGeorge, please clarify and/or refocus as I'm not sure if this helps you.