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Rllink
08-11-2015, 07:43 AM
OK, I'm going to use Bob Dylan's song Don't Think Twice to illustrate my question.

C G Am
It ain't no use to sit and wonder why, babe
F C G
It don't matter, anyhow
C G Am
An' it ain't no use to sit and wonder why, babe
D7 G G7
If you don't know by now
C C7
When your rooster crows at the break of dawn
F D7
Look out your window and I'll be gone
C G Am F
You're the reason I'm trav'lin' on
C G C G
Don't think twice, it's all right

So correct me if I'm wrong, but this is the key of C. So I understand that the C is the root, the very first chord in the key, and it belongs there. How did the C7 get there? Is it still the number one chord, just with a little flavor? Is that how it gets there? But then we find the D7.
How did D7 find its way into that progression. When you think about the chords that go with each other in the key of C, the closest thing I see is ii or Dm. So did the D7 hijack that Dm at ii, or is it just there?

Let me say, for some people's sake around here, and they know who they are, ;) I may sound like I understand a lot more than I do, so try to keep it simple please. In fact, this may be the second time I've asked this, so take me through this gently. Thanks.

Fleacia
08-11-2015, 08:02 AM
Jim D'Ville has great explanations of this:
www.playukulelebyear.com

I think the best I can do is this. The D7, yes, it comes from the II chord (Dm in the key of C, you're right). That D7 is a transition chord. When you listen to a song, it's a chord you kind of notice, because (right again) it doesn't "naturally" happen in that key. As you see, it most often leads back to the V chord (G). The D note is still II: C, *D*, E, etc. That is the root of the chord. Anything else you do to it, whether making it major, minor, 7... That's like adding a hint of specific flavor.

I'm not saying not to read or ask here, or learn theory. But the best thing I've found that helps, is listening to music and either playing along, or picking out the chords to progressions/grooves I like. It's easier to learn by hearing and doing, applying things to music you play and enjoy. Stays in your mind that way.

Hope I haven't muddied the waters further...

Gary52
08-11-2015, 08:13 AM
Here's an older thread that may be helpful. The circle of fifths shows the most common chords in a key and the relationships between keys. Chords from nearby keys work pretty well. Scroll down through the thread and it's explained.

http://forum.ukuleleunderground.com/showthread.php?11818-Ukulele-Circle-of-Fifths

Rllink
08-11-2015, 08:17 AM
Jim D'Ville has great explanations of this:
www.playukulelebyear.com

I think the best I can do is this. The D7, yes, it comes from the II chord (Dm in the key of C, you're right). That D7 is a transition chord. When you listen to a song, it's a chord you kind of notice, because (right again) it doesn't "naturally" happen in that key. As you see, it most often leads back to the V chord (G). The D note is still II: C, *D*, E, etc. That is the root of the chord. Anything else you do to it, whether making it major, minor, 7... That's like adding a hint of specific flavor.

I'm not saying not to read or ask here, or learn theory. But the best thing I've found that helps, is listening to music and either playing along, or picking out the chords to progressions/grooves I like. It's easier to learn by hearing and doing, applying things to music you play and enjoy. Stays in your mind that way.

Hope I haven't muddied the waters further...I think that helps a lot. I'm actually doing what you suggest, listening to music, and trying to pick it up by listening, but I also am trying to understand the theory behind it all as well, to help me listen better, and understand what I'm listening to. Thanks. I'll got to that link that you posted later this afternoon, when I have some more time.

Rllink
08-11-2015, 08:21 AM
Here's an older thread that may be helpful. The circle of fifths shows the most common chords in a key and the relationships between keys. Chords from nearby keys work pretty well. Scroll down through the thread and it's explained.

http://forum.ukuleleunderground.com/showthread.php?11818-Ukulele-Circle-of-FifthsI have that exact circle of 5th printed out and I look at it a lot. I understand the circle of fifths to some extent, but it is when chords just show up that are not specifically and strategically placed in that chart of the circle of 5th that confuses me. Some more so than others. I'm trying to understand where those chords fit in to that nice little pie chart. But it isn't those chords on that chart that I'm not understanding. Or, maybe I just don't know how to read the chart. I'll take a look at that whole thread again tonight. It appears that there are more responses now, than there was the last time I read through them. Thanks.

Papa Bear
08-11-2015, 08:24 AM
The "five minutes before and five minutes after" rule on the circle of fifths is a very helpful rule, but just like many music principles, it may be broken occasionally. Sometimes going from the I chord to I7 (in this case, C to C7) allows a variation in the vocal line without having to make chord change that is difficult when executing a specific picking pattern. As you stated, it also adds a little spice.
On guitar, adding a 7th to Cmajor only requires moving one finger. It also allows the picking pattern to remain constant. Sometimes the II chord is used to give the feel of a key change without actually changing keys.
Sometimes, breaking the rules simply works. The circle of fifths is still very helpful though.

pulelehua
08-12-2015, 12:27 PM
They are what are called Secondary Dominants.

The Dominant just means the V chord of a key. Every chord has a name, and the V is called the Dominant.

So, a Secondary Dominant just means "the V of something other than the I."

Secondary Dominants are always Major. And they're usually 7 Chords (like A7, F7, etc.)

So, let's say you're in the key of C, and you want to play the secondary dominant of the vi chord.

The vi chord is Am. The V of Am is E. Major because it's a Secondary Dominant, and they're always major. You could also play E7.

If you see an odd chord, especially in ukulele music, it almost always serves as the V chord of whatever follows it.

C7 will almost always go to F. C is the V of F.
D7 will almost always go to G. D is the V of G.

Secondary Dominants belong to a group of chords called Chromatic Chords. These use notes outside the normal notes of the key, to add colour. Chromatic literally means "colourful".

Hope that helps.


John

Strumdaddy
08-12-2015, 02:04 PM
Another way of tuning in to what's going on is to listen to the movement of sound...
Play the chord changes slowly and really pay attention to the flow of sounds. It's all about the movement - that's what a song is, a little journey.
All journeys take you somewhere, and usually end up back home.
Any movement away from the set path (ie: the key of the song) adds some adventure and a little challenge, but listen to where they end up - usually back where you started, in your comfy chair in front of the fire place with a hot cup of cocoa. Ahhhhhh....

VegasGeorge
08-12-2015, 04:23 PM
Yeah, it's the circle of Fifths. The V chord leads to the I chord. The V of V leads to the V, which leads to the I, etc. G is the V of C. D is the V of G. Adding the 7th creates an added urge for the chord to resolve. So, D7 to G7 to C feels just right. And notice in the tune how the C7 resolves to the F. Again, it's coming down a fifth.