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1300cc
08-12-2015, 02:17 PM
anyone have tried making a soundport on a pono mahogany tenor? is it safe and easy to do?

UkerDanno
08-12-2015, 02:35 PM
Get a hole saw and cut a hole, that's pretty easy. Finishing it is a different story, depending on your skills...

johnson430
08-12-2015, 03:47 PM
What kind of wood working skills do you have?
I just recently started working with wood by learning the art of wooden boat building at a local boat works and museum where I volunteer in the summer.
I have built a surf ski and I am working on my own sailing canoe now. That being said...
Would I cut a soundport in my Pono?
Hell no.
But if you are serious, then I would post this in the luthier forum and get some sage advice from the professionals.
Good luck.
Johnson

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
08-12-2015, 04:40 PM
Installing a side sound port on an uke that's already built can be done but it's not for the faint of heart. Ideally, a patch off cross-grain wood would be glued to the inside of the bout where the SSP is to be located for reinforcement. Alternatively, small braces can be glued on either side of the hole after it's cut but that's really not the best solution. In any event, a hole pattern is made and drawn on the desired location and a series of small holes drilled well within the line. Afterwards, sandpaper, a rasp, or what works very well is a 1/2" sanding drum mounted in a Dremel tool, to finish the hole to shape. Seal the end grain of the hole with lacquer. Of course you risk screwing the whole thing up and ruining your uke in which case I never wrote this. Good luck. ;)

stevejfc
08-12-2015, 05:08 PM
I'm with what Chuck says. It just ain't that easy. I guess if you're really serious about trying this, you might consider buying a cheap second hand uke at a thrift store, and practice on that 1st.

Installing a side sound port on an uke that's already built can be done but it's not for the faint of heart. Ideally, a patch off cross-grain wood would be glued to the inside of the bout where the SSP is to be located for reinforcement. Alternatively, small braces can be glued on either side of the hole after it's cut but that's really not the best solution. In any event, a hole pattern is made and drawn on the desired location and a series of small holes drilled well within the line. Afterwards, sandpaper, a rasp, or what works very well is a 1/2" sanding drum mounted in a Dremel tool, to finish the hole to shape. Seal the end grain of the hole with lacquer. Of course you risk screwing the whole thing up and ruining your uke in which case I never wrote this. Good luck. ;)

DaveY
08-12-2015, 05:50 PM
I would just ask VegasGeorge (http://forum.ukuleleunderground.com/showthread.php?109488-My-Experience-Doing-Repair-Work) how to do it.

itsme
08-12-2015, 06:15 PM
That being said...
Would I cut a soundport in my Pono?
Hell no.
Me, neither. My Pono and my Mainland are my two best ukes. (Not exactly rolling in dough here.)


Of course you risk screwing the whole thing up and ruining your uke in which case I never wrote this.
That made me laugh. But yeah, seriously, Maybe you should experiment on a $10 no name uke you found at a yard sale or flea market before you risk ruining a good uke.

1300cc
08-12-2015, 07:14 PM
thanks for all your comments, so non of you have tried it, then I wont try it either. ....

kohanmike
08-12-2015, 07:38 PM
I've cut holes in the sides of a number of ukes to insert a preamp, not much different than for a sound hole I would think, except for finishing. I didn't find it difficult, just have to be careful. I draw the outline, then use a Dremel with a speed bit to cut most of center material, then use a small fine sanding drum. Always came out nice and clean.

k0k0peli
08-12-2015, 07:48 PM
My first 'uke (two years already!) was/is a cheap Kohala soprano KD-STPD with a sound port already installed. Well, actually, it's the mount for a removable digital tuner, about 25 x 15 mm (0.6 x 1.0 inches). The only reinforcement is the plastic frame screwed into the 'uke's side -- no extra bracing. I haven't bothered with the tuner since I got a couple of Snarks so the port is usually open. Does it make a difference? I more recently bought the same model but without the tuner and port, a KD-SPI (for US$18 shipped). Strung and tuned the same, I can't distinguish between them. (That's why I restrung the KD-SPI in fifths.) With the KD-STPD's tuner out and the side port functioning, I hear *slightly* more volume directed at me than with the port blocked. YMMV.

tangimango
08-12-2015, 10:02 PM
using chucks method is the way to go. Making a soundport can change the sound of your ukulele, good or bad. Also cosmetically you put a soundhole in the wrong spot or not shape it nice, it looks hideous.

DangerLaef
08-13-2015, 01:48 PM
anyone have tried making a soundport on a pono mahogany tenor? is it safe and easy to do?


Why would you do this?
The Uke is signed with a specific size sound hole for it's volume,
It's not the "place were the sound come out."

Adding a sound hole will ruin the Helmholtz Resonance,
unless for some strange reason the sound hole was too small too start with.

http://newt.phys.unsw.edu.au/jw/Helmholtz.html

DownUpDave
08-13-2015, 02:46 PM
Why would you do this?
The Uke is signed with a specific size sound hole for it's volume,
It's not the "place were the sound come out."

Adding a sound hole will ruin the Helmholtz Resonance,
unless for some strange reason the sound hole was too small too start with.

http://newt.phys.unsw.edu.au/jw/Helmholtz.html

There is a difference between a sound hole which is on the sound board and a side sound port which is on the left upper bout. This opening directs sound at the player giving a much truer listening experience for the person playing it.

82364

DangerLaef
08-13-2015, 03:28 PM
There is a difference between a sound hole which is on the sound board and a side sound port which is on the left upper bout. This opening directs sound at the player giving a much truer listening experience for the person playing it.

82364


Unfortunately, they are both holes in the resonant space.
If it's designed that way, the front hole will be smaller to compensate,
but if it's not, adding one will change the resonance of the body.

Also; the sound comes from the soundboard, not the hole.
The hole allows freer movement of the soundboard at some frequencies.


I think this explains it well:
http://newt.phys.unsw.edu.au/music/guitar/guitarintro.html#air

DownUpDave
08-13-2015, 03:40 PM
Unfortunately, they are both holes in the resonant space.
If it's designed that way, the front hole will be smaller to compensate,
but if it's not, adding one will change the resonance of the body.

Also; the sound comes from the soundboard, not the hole.
The hole allows freer movement of the soundboard at some frequencies.

Yup your right.........there are now two holes in the uke. It is not "unfortunate" it is really nice, you should experience it, very enjoyable.

DangerLaef
08-13-2015, 03:54 PM
You misunderstand me, it's unfortunate to damage the designed resonance by adding a hole to an existing uke.

If it's designed with two holes from scratch it's fine.

Seriously, have a look at this link:
http://newt.phys.unsw.edu.au/music/guitar/guitarintro.html#air
it explains it.

spookelele
08-13-2015, 05:02 PM
Seriously, have a look at this link:
http://newt.phys.unsw.edu.au/music/guitar/guitarintro.html#air
it explains it.

That explanation is incomplete though.

Helmholtz resonance is for a specific pitch based on the volume of air, the area of the port, and the depth if there is a tube in the port.

But a uke doesn't play just one pitch, and it doesn't generate tone in just one way.

A bottle has a natural helmholtz frequency. If you blow across the top of the bottle, you'll hear the pitch. If you add water to change the volume you'll change the pitch of the toot.

But if you hit the bottle, you will get a different pitch. And if you hit the bottle with water in it and slosh the water around, you'll get lots of bending pitches, even though the port size, and the volume of air inside stay the same.

A uke is not just a ported box of air. It's more complex than that, and I don't pretend to understand it all. But I am certain that the volume of air, and the area of the port are only a small fraction of the total picture of what makes a uke sound.

Even if you cant wrap your head around the math.. it's very easy to understand that sound bounces around inside, and comes out any holes.

k0k0peli
08-13-2015, 05:13 PM
... making a soundport on a pono mahogany tenor... Maybe contact Pono and ask for guidance here? Please share any response.

hollisdwyer
08-13-2015, 06:49 PM
There is a difference between a sound hole which is on the sound board and a side sound port which is on the left upper bout. This opening directs sound at the player giving a much truer listening experience for the person playing it.

My first experience with a side sound port was when I commissioned my Boat Paddle ML Tenor. I was so impressed by the benefits of sonic feedback while I was playing, I promised myself that any new Ukulele I commissioned would have a side sound port. The Beau Hannam and Barron Rover Tenors that I have in the works now will have side sound ports. I believe that they are well worth the extra cost. I wouldn't, however, try and retrofit one to an existing instrument. They are more than just a neat hole in the side.

CTurner
08-14-2015, 03:45 AM
+1 for laughter.


Me, neither. My Pono and my Mainland are my two best ukes. (Not exactly rolling in dough here.)


That made me laugh. But yeah, seriously, Maybe you should experiment on a $10 no name uke you found at a yard sale or flea market before you risk ruining a good uke.