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View Full Version : Fixing an Ovation Soprano Applause



ill-attack
03-23-2009, 04:59 PM
Has anyone ever fixed an Ovation Applause Soprano uke? I have some questions as to fixing the neck. It's become lose because I dropped it and the part behind it where its (glue?) to the body has become loose. Any help is highly appreciated. : (

Kekani
03-24-2009, 09:56 PM
There are times when the cost of fixing an instrument doesn't match with the value.

If you're not seeing much response, its because most builders consider plastic instruments sacriledge, and probably wouldn't touch it. You may want to bring it to a pure repair guy, or technician.

In the case of an Applause, its inexpensive enough to just get another one. I'm sure MGM has them in stock.

ukantor
03-24-2009, 10:54 PM
I read this cry for help, but did not respond simply because I've never worked on a plastic-bodied instrument. No prejudice involved - I like the Applause type ukes; I just don't know which glue will work on them. If dropping it can cause the neck to come loose, it suggests that whatever it was fixed with at the factory didn't work very well. If I dropped a wooden uke I would expect other types of damage first. A loose neck would be way down the list.

The problem is that there are several different types of plastic - what works on one may not work on another. I'd suggest asking the manufacturers, or the distributors, what might work.

A friend of mine has an old Applause. He bought it second hand, and it looked a bit rough, but it sounded good. The front then split quite badly, so he held it with gaffa tape. That worked for a while, but the damage got worse, so he glued the splits with normal white woodworking glue (wood to wood, no problem) and it sounds really good. It looks like something Seasick Steve would feel comfortable with, but my buddy plays it more than any of his posh ukes.

Ukantor.

ill-attack
03-25-2009, 09:35 AM
thank you both for the advice. i'm sad to hear about the repair world for non wood ukes. : ( i can easily replace it, but i sorta have sentimental value to this particular uke. haha, in any case, i will try calling the manufacture.

NukeDOC
03-25-2009, 09:44 AM
if the ukulele has real sentimental value, then it might actually be worth it to have it repaired.

if it is barely holding on, however and will basically stay on if you leave it alone and dont abuse it, then another option would be to use that money that you would have used to repair it, and buy another one just like it. set the sentimental one aside in a safe place from now on and enjoy the new ukulele.

if its just "sentimental" value, like because its your first ukulele but you know you would sell it one day to get a better one... just keep it. and try everything you can think of to fix it so it at least holds up until you get that new ukulele. get macgyver on it. some 2 part expoxy, duct tape, and a c clamp might do the trick.

... please dont take this advice too seriously. if you do value your instrument, but dont know your way around the stuff, have someone take care of it for you. but if you have nothing to lose... then you have nothing to lose.

ill-attack
03-25-2009, 10:19 AM
i think i'm going to use piping glue to it down. i've used it on other things, and it gets rocks hard. maybe ill clamp it down. since the action is highler because of it perhaps ill file down the bridge nut thing of a bop and try to lower the action that way.

ukantor
03-25-2009, 10:50 AM
Do try to find out which glue is recommended for the type of plastic used in the body. If you try a glue that turns out not to work, you've used up your only shot. You won't get a second chance. Something that sets hard is not enough. It must adhere to the plastic, and some plastics will shrug off some glues.

I agree with Kekani that it would not be worth paying for a professional repair, but if you can make a successful job of it yourself,then your attachment to that uke will be even stronger. My favourite uke is one I repaired myself. It had been written off as not worth bothering with, but the store gave it to me, and I fixed it.

Ukantor.

ps. Don't get attached to your uke by glue - that's painful!

NukeDOC
03-25-2009, 11:19 AM
Do try to find out which glue is recommended for the type of plastic used in the body. If you try a glue that turns out not to work, you've used up your only shot. You won't get a second chance. Something that sets hard is not enough. It must adhere to the plastic, and some plastics will shrug off some glues.

I agree with Kekani that it would not be worth paying for a professional repair, but if you can make a successful job of it yourself,then your attachment to that uke will be even stronger. My favourite uke is one I repaired myself. It had been written off as not worth bothering with, but the store gave it to me, and I fixed it.

Ukantor.

ps. Don't get attached to your uke by glue - that's painful!

hmmm that gives me an idea. i wonder if guitar center has some stuff that was broken in shipment that they would just "let go of".

ukantor
03-25-2009, 11:41 AM
NukeDOC, it's worth asking. Even if they are beyond repair, you can often salvage the necks and bridges and use 'em to make a cigar-box uke.

Ukantor.

NukeDOC
03-25-2009, 11:47 AM
NukeDOC, it's worth asking. Even if they are beyond repair, you can often salvage the necks and bridges and use 'em to make a cigar-box uke.

Ukantor.

imagine if i found a guitar neck! hahaha

ukantor
03-25-2009, 12:17 PM
Bottles of expensive wine come in solid wooden boxes. Nicely embossed with name of chateau etc. They are a bit deep in the "body" but that can be adjusted. Would look cool strung up to a guitar neck.

Ukantor.

ill-attack
03-26-2009, 08:12 AM
Righto! I'm off to Sam Ash to ask the luthier dude what kinda of glue he'd recommend (Since I know they work with ovation guitars and all)...and I am going to ask if they have crap they can just let go of.