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View Full Version : B7 is my current bugaboo, any help???



sculptor
10-04-2015, 11:05 AM
The barred second fret is fine until my middle finger gets close to the C string causing the A string to go become muted. :( Does anybody out there have any alternate fingerings or ideas on how to pull this off.

Note, I'm running into this problem in Uncle Rod's Ukulele Boot Camp. Also note, I play a Pono MT which I got from HMS (so it's properly set up.)

Thanks,

-- Gary

Mivo
10-04-2015, 11:10 AM
For me, the 4320 fingering for B7 is easier:

http://www.ukulele-chords.com/B7/2

lakesideglenn
10-04-2015, 12:05 PM
For me, the 4320 fingering for B7 is easier:

http://www.ukulele-chords.com/B7/2

Ditto...I like the sound the open 1st string brings

stevejfc
10-04-2015, 12:12 PM
Ditto...I like the sound the open 1st string brings

Double ditto!!

deschutestrout
10-04-2015, 12:19 PM
triple ditto. then go to Em ... I use this paring in many of my original uke tunes :-)

Ukejenny
10-04-2015, 12:45 PM
If you want to play it barred, then allow you index finger to hang off the top edge of the fingerboard as you lay it down. The tip of your index finger will be kind of "dangling" as you curve your middle finger to hit the C string. Moving the index finger up allows that middle finger to achieve a better curve, so you only hit the C string and the A string is left unhindered.

mailman
10-04-2015, 12:54 PM
If you want to play it barred, then allow you index finger to hang off the top edge of the fingerboard as you lay it down. The tip of your index finger will be kind of "dangling" as you curve your middle finger to hit the C string. Moving the index finger up allows that middle finger to achieve a better curve, so you only hit the C string and the A string is left unhindered.

This sounds like excellent advice....

HBolte
10-04-2015, 01:12 PM
You may also want to try leading with your middle finger on the C string followed by your index finger. A little practice and you'll get it. Keep practicing because it's one of the easiest barre chords and will help prepare you for the more difficult barre chords down the road.

hendulele
10-04-2015, 01:13 PM
I finally got to the point where I could shift to first position Em comfortably from other chords. So the 4320 fingering for B7 is now a piece of cake. Practice, practice, practice ...

maxmax
10-04-2015, 10:27 PM
I strongly recommend to not simply ignore or find an alternative fingering for this chord now. It's an essential fingering that is movable, you will use this a lot in different parts of the neck. It will get easier, I promise. You can use alternative fingerings for certain songs later, but at least learn how to do this one.

If you need a little more pop or sustain from the first string, hold the barre so you fret the first string with the boney part of your index finger - in the crease of the middle knuckle. You can also try fretting the C string with your ring finger and see if that's easier for now.

hollisdwyer
10-05-2015, 02:12 AM
I strongly recommend to not simply ignore or find an alternative fingering for this chord now. It's an essential fingering that is movable, you will use this a lot in different parts of the neck. It will get easier, I promise. You can use alternative fingerings for certain songs later, but at least learn how to do this one.

If you need a little more pop or sustain from the first string, hold the barre so you fret the first string with the boney part of your index finger - in the crease of the middle knuckle. You can also try fretting the C string with your ring finger and see if that's easier for now.

You'll get there with practice and maxmax's advice is good re preparing yourself to master movable chords. However sometimes I am more gentle with myself and use the 4320 fingering. It is very easy to switch to the Em chord using this fingering which I do a lot for a number of songs that is in my groups songbook. I think you should strive for advanced technique but I also think that you should have fun getting there and playing smoothly with a group is a good starting point.

cdkrugjr
10-05-2015, 02:18 AM
One thing I used to do was let the uke sit too deep in my hand.

It helped me quite a bit to concentrate on holding my thumb position. This felt awkward at first, but eventually will give you both a better reach down on the fretboard as well as a smoother transition between open and barred voicings.

maxmax
10-05-2015, 02:36 AM
You'll get there with practice and maxmax's advice is good re preparing yourself to master movable chords. However sometimes I am more gentle with myself and use the 4320 fingering. It is very easy to switch to the Em chord using this fingering which I do a lot for a number of songs that is in my groups songbook. I think you should strive for advanced technique but I also think that you should have fun getting there and playing smoothly with a group is a good starting point.
Lol, sorry if I sounded too strict, I also think you should have fun playing the uke and not do anything you're not enjoying... As long as you get that bloody barre chord under control first! :mad::p

HBolte
10-05-2015, 03:03 AM
I think you should strive for advanced technique but I also think that you should have fun getting there and playing smoothly with a group is a good starting point.

I agree with maxmax. The B7 is certainly not advanced technique! It is one of the simplest barre chords. Practice and learn it if you want to go anywhere with playing the uke! Sculptor, just do it 20 times a day for a week and you'll be an old pro!

Cornfield
10-05-2015, 04:32 AM
If you barre with your index finger, you can use your second finger to push the index down. I see some guitarists doing this.

70sSanO
10-05-2015, 04:57 AM
If you barre with your index finger, you can use your second finger to push the index down. I see some guitarists doing this.

Coming from guitar, I though everyone used the index finger to do barre chords. Using any other finger puts the index finger on the wrong side of the barre.

John

hollisdwyer
10-05-2015, 05:24 AM
I agree with maxmax. The B7 is certainly not advanced technique! It is one of the simplest barre chords. Practice and learn it if you want to go anywhere with playing the uke! Sculptor, just do it 20 times a day for a week and you'll be an old pro!

Many people find fretting any barre chord difficult, even simple ones like a B7. The difficult ones take a lot of practice but that practice shouldn't get in the way of having fun in the meantime.

70sSanO
10-05-2015, 06:00 AM
Please reread. Mr Sargent was suggesting that one solidify the index barre by pressing the middle finger down on top of it. I don't recommend this simply because you must be able to play other notes with your other fingers. Using this two-finger barre locks up the hand. It also applies excessive pressure—if you need to resort to this formation, you're probably doing something else wrong (or your action is too high).
Got it.

Thanks!

John

Cornfield
10-05-2015, 06:11 AM
Please reread. Mr Sargent was suggesting that one solidify the index barre by pressing the middle finger down on top of it. I don't recommend this simply because you must be able to play other notes with your other fingers. Using this two-finger barre locks up the hand. It also applies excessive pressure—if you need to resort to this formation, you're probably doing something else wrong (or your action is too high).

I've seen some people do this with guitar. If the OP is playing a B7, it will work for him. Same with a Bm as each of them only require one additional finger. This would be a movable chord as well.

photoshooter
10-05-2015, 06:13 AM
I barre with my index or middle finger. Instead of pushing my finger straight down on the frets I roll my finger slightly to the outside. So I'm pressing with a less fleshy, more bony part of my finger. I find it easier this way.

HBolte
10-05-2015, 07:02 AM
Many people find fretting any barre chord difficult, even simple ones like a B7. The difficult ones take a lot of practice but that practice shouldn't get in the way of having fun in the meantime.

The more you practice and faster you learn barre chords, the more fun you will have! :)

MARKbOC
10-05-2015, 08:00 AM
This isnt my thread so i apologize for the mini-hijack but this post is a great example of why i love UU, especially as a beginner.

Encouragement, work-arounds, long-term skill development strategy... lots of ways of looking at and solving a problem. cool stuff. thanks to everyone who contributes

sculptor
10-05-2015, 11:01 AM
If you barre with your index finger, you can use your second finger to push the index down. I see some guitarists doing this.

I've tried that and all the other combinations for 2322 already. It does help a bit but I can't consistently get it to work.

Note, I'm probably doing all kinds of screwy things in order to make other chords work! :shaka:

70sSanO
10-05-2015, 11:18 AM
You may be able to just practice barring all 4 strings with your index finger... 2222.

If you can get used to placing a barre across the strings and getting a clean sound, then it is just a matter of fretting the other notes as needed.

If it hurts your finger just to do a barre, you may have to lower the strings or get lower tension strings.

John

sculptor
10-06-2015, 09:40 AM
You may be able to just practice barring all 4 strings with your index finger... 2222.

If you can get used to placing a barre across the strings and getting a clean sound, then it is just a matter of fretting the other notes as needed.

If it hurts your finger just to do a barre, you may have to lower the strings or get lower tension strings.

John

I can get 2222 to work by slightly rolling my index finger clockwise. However, that doesn't work with 2322 all that well because the middle finger is rotated too and it mutes the A string. Note, I think the higher tension strings on a Pono are the real issue here.

Mivo
10-06-2015, 09:46 AM
Have you tried using your ring finger (instead of the middle finger) for the 3 in 2322? That gives me better results.

70sSanO
10-06-2015, 10:33 AM
I can get 2222 to work by slightly rolling my index finger clockwise. However, that doesn't work with 2322 all that well because the middle finger is rotated too and it mutes the A string. Note, I think the higher tension strings on a Pono are the real issue here.

You know... that video above really is helpful. Granted, higher tension strings require more pressure, but the technique described is still valid.

I had never been told or shown that technique, but I was 13 when I first picked up a guitar and, back then, unless your fingers were bleeding you weren't trying hard enough... lol

John

EDIT ADDED: Also my choices were the guitar or the accordion and in 1964 there was no way I wanted to learn the accordion. No offense to any accordion players out there.

Pueo
10-06-2015, 12:00 PM
Just one observation - and I will admit I did not watch the video so I apologize if it is mentioned there already...
Many people, especially when learning, have a tendency to look at their fingers while fingering chords. This often means that they have to tip the top of the fretboard back so that they may see their fingers. This also means that the wrist is now curled farther, making fretting more difficult and inviting fatigue since you now have to press harder to get a clean sound.

My suggestion is to relax a bit, offset the pressure needed to fret with the thumb on the neck, and keep that fingerboard perpendicular to the ground - as close to a vertical plane as possible.

"Wait! Then I can't see my fingers!"
"You should be looking at your music, not your hand." This was what my teacher always told me YEARS ago when I was taking guitar lessons.
It may seem awkward at first, but trust me it gets easier. Your hand / wrist position will improve and your transitions will get smoother, especially when you no longer need to look at them. Practice and patience.