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bunnyf
10-08-2015, 02:19 PM
What can you expect to pay for a cracked bridge replacement and the removal of a bad pick guard on an old tenor guitar. I'm not handy and I don't have a luthier locally. Can I rely on an average guitar shop to do this kind of repair?
Sorry mods maybe this isn't the right spot to post this... Move if necessary

bunnyf
10-08-2015, 04:02 PM
Another question. Would you replace it right away, if you see the crack but it's not lifting or would you wait?

MutinousDoug
10-08-2015, 04:44 PM
Cracked bridge is not going to fix itself.

I've no experience with cracked bridges on a ukulele but have had two guitar bridges repaired. The 1st by a local hack. A workman like repair; competent if you are satisfied that the bridge was replaced in the same place as the old one. Cosmetically lacking.

The 2nd guitar, worked on by technicians more locally advertised, made more of an effort to find a factory replacement and clean up their work beyond locating the saddle where it belonged. Their work left no signature and I was much more satisfied aesthetically.

The 1st guitar is a Yamaha FG-75. The 2nd is a Simon & Patrick ProFolk. In the long run, I am satisfied with both repairs. The FG-75 was done some years ago for about $100. The ProFolk in 2014 for $164.

bunnyf
10-08-2015, 05:13 PM
Thanks for the info Doug. It's not a great guitar but I'd like to play it occasionally. Was hoping not to have to spend too much. Im not sure if I can get a great repair done where I live. There's like one shop within 50 miles and it's very rinkydink. Hardly any guitars for sale, just a little really low end stuff and not known for doing repairs. I'm not a DYIer but I hate to spend a lot to have it repaired poorly.

librainian
10-08-2015, 06:15 PM
thats a tough break and an even tougher decision. this page on frets.com helped me make a similar decision. I hadn't considered that the bridge plate was the real issue and that reinforcing it to help it do its job in bearing a lot of the string tension allowed me to glue a small crack before it got worse and avoid a bridge replacement.

http://www.frets.com/FretsPages/Musician/Guitar/Maintenance/CrackedBridges/crackedbridges.html

Best of luck on your repair!

bunnyf
10-08-2015, 06:45 PM
Thanks for the link, librainian. My crack is very fine and goes thru the bridge pins and continues out one side (and a bit toward the other). It s not open a cross the top of the bridge, but it is a bit open when viewed from the side, where it comes out. I would hope the bridge plate is not involved. Also don't know if any glue was already used on the crack.

SteveZ
10-09-2015, 02:46 AM
Have you gotten an estimate yet? If Music Stand in Port Charlotte is still in business they should be able to give an ballpark idea of the cost over the phone. If the cost is over $100 or so and the current instrument is of otherwise low value, it may be just worth it to get something like an Ibanez PFT2 for around $180 for those times when the tenor guitar bug bites.

bunnyf
10-09-2015, 10:41 AM
Thanks Steve, Music Stand was probably where I'd have to take it. It's the only shop around. Don't know though that they are really up to the task. I've gone there a few times and was not impressed. Once, they were afraid to install a strap button, another time I tried to have a pickup installed (a Misi) and they had no idea how to do it. I wonder what kind of result I'd get. That's why I was questioning whether I should leave the crack alone and if so, when SHOULD I do something. I'm using light t strings on it. Action is nice and intonation is spot on.

river_driver
10-09-2015, 12:53 PM
bunnyf,
Is this the Harmony 1201 you posted about in the Guitar section of the forums?

Those are nice guitars - modestly priced as you pointed out, and underappreciated by the masses, but Harmony has a cult following and you have a desirable guitar there.

I don't know what you paid, and the repair cost will vary from shop to shop based on location, and the skill set and interest of the repair guy. But in good condition, those routinely sell for prices well north of $350.

If it were mine, I would want it worked on by someone who appreciates vintage American guitars that were made for the average, blue collar American player - as this Harmony was. Not somebody who's incapable of installing a strap button, and not somebody who thinks if it's not a vintage Martin or Gibson it's not worth his time.

Captain Simian
10-09-2015, 02:24 PM
bunnyf,
Is this the Harmony 1201 you posted about in the Guitar section of the forums?

Those are nice guitars - modestly priced as you pointed out, and underappreciated by the masses, but Harmony has a cult following and you have a desirable guitar there.

I don't know what you paid, and the repair cost will vary from shop to shop based on location, and the skill set and interest of the repair guy. But in good condition, those routinely sell for prices well north of $350.

If it were mine, I would want it worked on by someone who appreciates vintage American guitars that were made for the average, blue collar American player - as this Harmony was. Not somebody who's incapable of installing a strap button, and not somebody who thinks if it's not a vintage Martin or Gibson it's not worth his time.

In other words, talk to Jake at Antebellum Instruments. You'll have to ship it to him but he does good work. I have a couple of his ukes and I have no complaints about them.

bunnyf
10-09-2015, 02:40 PM
River driver, yes, it's the Harmony. You hit the nail on the head, re: the repair. It's a dilemma. I was able to get warped pickguards myself and most all the glue but no luck straightening it, so I ordered a replica replacement. The bridge crack is fine (not spread open) but a bit worrisome. I was nervous restringing it but it seems ok. I don't trust the one local shop and the few luthiers near me (1-2 hrs away) are not interested in doing repairs, busy on custom stuff or getting stock inventory done, which is in high demand. They would not be interested in working on a lowly Harmony. BTW, I'm quite happy with the Harmony. It's very basic, but it's solid wood & US made, and I like the idea of keeping existing instruments going, instead of just tossing them. Many folks encouraged me to get a new Chines made Blueridge or similar, but I'm happy with what I've got, regardless of issues. I guess I'll wait to see if there is any change in the bridge and in the meantime ask other local guitar players who they use.

cpmusic
10-09-2015, 04:20 PM
I have an older Taylor guitar that developed a crack along the pin holes about 20 years ago. I chose to have it repaired. My local shop would have done an excellent job, but they couldn't find a decent replacement, so it went down to Taylor, about two hours south of my home. They cut a new one to match (a rosewood belly bridge) and did a top-notch job. I don't know if the original bridge would have held out, but I've never been sorry for choosing the repair.

river_driver
10-10-2015, 10:19 AM
In other words, talk to Jake at Antebellum Instruments. You'll have to ship it to him but he does good work. I have a couple of his ukes and I have no complaints about them.
Yep. Jake Wildwood is the best for these kinds of projects.

bunnyf
10-10-2015, 10:35 AM
Thanks for the tip. I've been to Antebellum's website and he really has some nice instruments. I'm sure I will be mailing it away to be repaired, when the time comes and I will remember Jake (and he's relatively close too, so less travel time). Thanks again.