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View Full Version : Why Do I Keep Doing This to Myself???



Katz-in-Boots
10-17-2015, 08:23 PM
I have a Kamaka Ohta-San. It lives with my other ukes, cases, music stands & amps in the dark cupboard under the stairs. I plan to sell it to fund other uke purchases (or even just pay off my credit card) because the scale is just that bit too big for my hands.

Every now & then I do what responsible uke owners do; I get it out & top up its humidifier, check it over and tune it. As you do.

Then I strum a few chords. That sounds so good I do a little picking. Then I do some more. And strum some more. I know I can't play it for more than a few minutes without upsetting my injured hands/neck/shoulder, so it's pointless keeping it. But soon I'm thinking; "this sounds so darn good, how can I possibly sell it?"

Sigh. Same with my Ubass. I love playing bass but can't put in the time to learn how to play it well, so I really should pass it on to someone who will play it. Which reminds me, I forgot to check on the bass, I'd better do that next, just to make sure it is okay before I list it to sell....

This is why that dark cupboard under the stairs conceals my shame: ukuleles I almost never play. At least my Kanile'a is out of the cupboard at the moment.

It isn't exactly UAS (though I just bought another one), but inability to let a good uke go. I can't be alone in this dilemma.

Patrick Madsen
10-17-2015, 09:32 PM
LOL, I was thinking the same thoughts not more than a couple of hours ago. I have ukes that I should sell. I get them out and play for awhile then put them back behind the curtain to the closet knowing I'll wait awhile to make up my mind. It's a toss up of selling the '62 pristine Martin baritone or the Webber baritone. Strumsilly's selling his Favilla started this whole cycle up again so I'm blaming him. Also Dave Eberts message on Pono coming out with a short scaled tenor guitar soon didn't help either.

Your not alone Katz but it sure seems that way when it comes time to make the choice of which one.... if any.

DownUpDave
10-17-2015, 11:13 PM
I will join the walk of shame with both of you. My walk takes me to the basement which has become the island of misfit ukes. There is a Koaloha Opio concert, Gianinni baritone, Collings UT2 sunburst, Loprinzi mahogany super soprano, Compass Rose 5 string tenor.

All great ukes that I love but playing time varies from once a week to once a month. All except one were bought used so I got them at a good price and I keep them because.................well I'm not 100% sure why. I guess the same reason as Katz in boots, I open up the case and play it a bit and I start to smile. Then I am doomed.

Rllink
10-18-2015, 03:26 AM
I won a Waterman, and I decided right off that I didn't need another ukulele. I thought that I would find some deserving person and send them on the journey. I still have it.

fretie
10-18-2015, 05:37 AM
hahaha... I've been on the other end of this uke lovers dilemma. A while back when I was hunting for a uke here in the UU marketplace, I finally bit the bullet and put in an offer on a fine instrument that had been for sale for about a week. By that time the seller was already having seller's remorse before even having sold the instrument! I topped up my offer but to no avail, the seller was too attached to the uke and decided to not sell it after all.

Nickie
10-18-2015, 02:49 PM
I have no idea how to explain this. I have NO ukes sitting in cases. Mine are on stands, unless I'm playing one or schlepping one around in its case. Tammy's, on the other hand, sit for days. Go figure. She does have guitaritis though. When one of mine goes unplayed for a few days, it gets picked up and reminded that I love it, too. If I ever have any that I don't play, they find new homes. I don't like clutter, even if it's uke clutter.

sam13
10-18-2015, 02:57 PM
I only have one Uke that isn't getting love.

I could find the heart to love the Ohta San AND the Webber Baritone if either of you feel compelled to sell to fund other Uke purchases. LOL.

Nickie
10-18-2015, 03:01 PM
I love Ohta San ukes. I wonder how much they cost?

I guess "If ya hafta ask, ya can't afford it."

LOL

fretie
10-18-2015, 04:20 PM
I have no idea how to explain this. I have NO ukes sitting in cases. Mine are on stands, unless I'm playing one or schlepping one around in its case. Tammy's, on the other hand, sit for days. Go figure. She does have guitaritis though. When one of mine goes unplayed for a few days, it gets picked up and reminded that I love it, too. If I ever have any that I don't play, they find new homes. I don't like clutter, even if it's uke clutter.

Same same.

Mine all get played or they go out the door. No room for uke clutter here either and I just don't have the heart to impose uke neglect on any of my jumping fleas.

janeray1940
10-18-2015, 04:36 PM
Having been through a similar dilemma recently with an Ohta-San... I'd say that playing it at all is what you're doing wrong! Kidding, sort of - but when I start thinking about selling a uke, generally I wait until I haven't played it for at least 3 months and then decide what to do. Out of sight, out of mind, etc., and so far, no regrets or seller's remorse. I'm in the "I hate clutter" camp too, even if it's uke clutter, but then I live in a 250 square foot house and every possession is carefully considered.



I love Ohta San ukes. I wonder how much they cost?


MSRP is $1995. If one can play that scale length, and one can afford it, they're worth it IMO. But personally I'm much happier with my lesser Kamakas that are more my size and less flashy, at half the cost.

igorthebarbarian
10-18-2015, 05:15 PM
Chances are (it sounds like) you won't miss it if it's gone. I've been downsizing ukes -- life in general -- and trying to be anti-Hoarder...

rockyl
10-18-2015, 06:09 PM
I'm guilty too. I have seven now and of that two I've been telling my teacher I'm going to sell (for almost a year). (Sigh) Maybe...

kohanmike
10-18-2015, 07:27 PM
In the first 18 months of playing uke, I went through 16, but a few months ago I culled them down to my 4 favorite, but I was also learning the bass in the last few months and now that's all that I've been playing (I'm up to 7, I show only my bass ukes below). I look at my 4 ukes in a humidified display case and know that I will not get rid of them, vowing I will pick them up, but hardly do.

ukulelekarcsi
10-18-2015, 08:49 PM
Lend it out for a few weeks. That's one way of testing wether you can actually do without it.

Tootler
10-18-2015, 10:38 PM
I have a similar dilemma. I have three that are doing very little. A decent soprano that I won in a prize draw at a uke festival and for that reason I'm loathe to let it go, a banjo uke that's loud and I just rarely play and a U Bass that I need to spend time on but somehow don't manage to. Of the three, the banjo uke is the one I would find easiest to let go. If I want loud, I can just as easily plug in one of my Risas.

I do also have three others that aren't doing much but they all have a use. One sits in the car and is my have handy if I've got a few minutes somewhere. One is a plastic Korala that is a loan uke for my uke group if a newcomer turns up without an instrument and one is a Risa stick that I have plans for once I get a round tuit and order some new strings while I'm at it.

VegasGeorge
10-19-2015, 01:20 AM
One solution that has worked for me is to build a display case for the Ukes. That way, you can see them every day, and you get to enjoy having them even if they don't get out to be played.

dsummers
10-19-2015, 04:49 AM
I too understand the dilemma well. I started the uke journey in 2009 and started purchasing at an average of about one a little more a month. I've acquired the likes of fluke, fleas, Glyph, William Kings, Koalohas, Kamakas, David Gill, Gary Gill, Southcoast, DaSilva, Kiwayas, Martins, Tangi, Boat Paddles, Talsma, Koolau, etc.- well you get the picture. I have done some trading with some fellow UU/Flea market members, but haven't actually sold any. Some excuses I use is that I don't no how to post pictures on the UU site although I don't know how to send pictures via email, the market is to soft now, and when I pull them out and play them I think "do I really want to do this". I like them all, but I have decided when I do break down to downsize there are some I I would keep and not necessary my custom/ costly ones. By the way, I am looking for a Santa Cruz to trade for something if you got one... (:>). I guess there are worse dilemmas in life that are a lot more important.

Fleacia
10-19-2015, 06:22 AM
I love Ohta San ukes. I wonder how much they cost?

I guess "If ya hafta ask, ya can't afford it."

LOL

LOL that would be me. I kinda know how much they cost as I've seen them in the marketplace. And I know I can't afford even half the asking price. So rather than insult the seller and the uke, I never make offers, but always look! :o

Stevelele
10-19-2015, 07:17 AM
Ohta Sans are great, but I've found that having fewer possessions and less clutter can make you substantially happier. I think if you sell it, you're going to be fine--you might miss it but that will eventually dissipate.

wayfarer75
10-19-2015, 08:43 AM
Yeah, to get an Ohta-San new I'd have to sell all my ukes. To get one used, I'd have to sell my Kamaka pineapple and Barron River concert. Neither of those is ever happening. So I wait for that lottery win or that inheritance from that long-lost relative....

caukulele
10-19-2015, 08:57 AM
I understand completely. I keep trying to down size as I really like to live a minimalist lifestyle, as much as possible...but it is still hard to part with a uke...and I have found out that if I decide to sell, then I should not play it at all, as once I strum a few bars..I hate to part with it...but I am trying to slowly downsize....

hollisdwyer
10-19-2015, 02:18 PM
It's interesting to read that many people have an intellectual desire to downsize but an emotional desire to hold on or to increase their collections. I guess I'm no different but because I will be retiring next year and moving across the country,most probably to an apartment, I am working on reducing my collection. My MM 6 string just went and my DaSilva Martin 3K should be sold by year end but I have two customs in the works and that final group of four seems to be a collection that I would not want to part with. Hopefully I can hitch up with an active Uke group in Melbourne that encourages me to play often and therefore make high use of all my instruments.

MARKbOC
10-19-2015, 02:30 PM
UAS is an odd affliction. I'm still pretty new but no matter how hard I've tried, I've only figured out how to play one at a time.
Despite this, I keep wanting more ukes. I do enjoy a little variety and switching sizes accomplishes that. But still I find myself thinking about buying ukes that wouldn't be much different than what I've got.
If someone knows of a way to describe this other than "I'm a slave to capitalism and can't control my consumption impulses" please let me know so I can explain to wifey

DownUpDave
10-19-2015, 02:46 PM
UAS is an odd affliction. I'm still pretty new but no matter how hard I've tried, I've only figured out how to play one at a time.
Despite this, I keep wanting more ukes. I do enjoy a little variety and switching sizes accomplishes that. But still I find myself thinking about buying ukes that wouldn't be much different than what I've got.
If someone knows of a way to describe this other than "I'm a slave to capitalism and can't control my consumption impulses" please let me know so I can explain to wifey


I will be glad to help you out. When a stringed instrument is held against our body and strummed it sends healthy healing vibrations through our body. That is why playing the uke makes us happy. Different sizes, different woods and different tunings all create different vibrations. Thus it takes many different ukes to make us completely healthy. Just tell your wife it's good for you:p

Nickie
10-19-2015, 02:55 PM
MSRP is $1995. If one can play that scale length, and one can afford it, they're worth it IMO. But personally I'm much happier with my lesser Kamakas that are more my size and less flashy, at half the cost.

Ouch! I was afraid of that.....

pritch
10-19-2015, 03:46 PM
Ouch! I was afraid of that.....

Yeah it is a lot of money, but I'd really like one. And I do mean "really". I can't play anywhere well enough to justify that sort of expenditure, but next year is the Kamaka centenary and I will have been playing another year longer by then so...

MARKbOC
10-19-2015, 03:53 PM
I will be glad to help you out. When a stringed instrument is held against our body and strummed it sends healthy healing vibrations through our body. That is why playing the uke makes us happy. Different sizes, different woods and different tunings all create different vibrations. Thus it takes many different ukes to make us completely healthy. Just tell your wife it's good for you:p

I've been playing a lot lately so I must be super healthy. In fact I think I'd better have a beer to avoid having my body go into toxic hyper healthy syndrome.
Thanks Dr DUDave!!
I'm off to explain both of these theories to my wife. Nice knowing you all!

Katz-in-Boots
10-19-2015, 05:10 PM
...I think if you sell it, you're going to be fine--you might miss it but that will eventually dissipate.


Chances are (it sounds like) you won't miss it if it's gone...

You are absolutely right! If I don't miss it while it's sitting in the cupboard, I won't miss it when it's gone. I just shouldn't strum it again before I list & sell (though I know I wouldn't be able to resist having a farewell play). Look forward to seeing this Ohta-San on the Marketplace very soon...



I will be glad to help you out. When a stringed instrument is held against our body and strummed it sends healthy healing vibrations through our body. That is why playing the uke makes us happy. Different sizes, different woods and different tunings all create different vibrations. Thus it takes many different ukes to make us completely healthy. Just tell your wife it's good for you:p

Love it DownUpDave. If you believe "vibrational" healers, this is true. Perhaps explains why we bond with some instruments and not others. I have discovered mahogany just doesn't do it for me, no matter how good it looks (though my bass is mahogany).

bunnyf
10-19-2015, 11:47 PM
It's funny, there have been a few threads recently about downsizing. Over the past five years, I've had probably about a dozen ukes. I've explored different sizes, tunings, vintage, custom, amped, fleas, and so on. They've all been a learning experience, but I've gotten to the point where I don't need them or even want them all anymore. I've gifted the starter ukes to family and friends. I've sold off all the sizes I don't enjoy playing anymore, even though that included a very nice custom. I've settled on two tunings I like and two sizes, I have a lovely LoPrinzi walnut soprano, reentrant tuning which fills all my little sweet, portable uke needs. And then I'm keeping a cedar, linear tuned Bari made by a little known luthier. It fills my guitar sounding need and suits a lot of the music I play. It's fit and finish is just ok but it has nice tone and a convenient misi pickup, for when I have to be plugged in. I'd never get much for it if I sold, so it's my beater and currently my daily player. I'm good right now with just these two. I get a little wistful over ones that are gone but I can't say that I really miss them that much. I remind myself that they weren't being played anyway, and get over it. In the not too distant future, I'll just add one more uke and that will be a nicer baritone (maybe a Martin) to take top spot as my daily player. I'd like to always keep it now to just one nice small, one nice big uke and maybe one beater. This feels like just the right amount for me. The only other stringed instrument I'm keeping is a tenor guitar, which I love for when I have that steel-string urge (love that sustain). Six string Taylor...gone..over the guitar (had to get it out of my system). Starting out, you buy, you sell, you live, you learn but at some point you may decide to simplify. That's where I am at now, and it feels good.

NewKid
10-20-2015, 05:45 AM
I liked your post bunnyf. I have a 1920s Martin soprano (complete with mojo) for strumming and a Kinnard baritone for everything I don't play on my two main tenor ukuleles. I play my LFdM and Boat Paddle tenors every day and they almost feel like one uke to me.

Both tenors are tuned in fifths - CGDA with Aquila 31Us. The Low C give the tenors a really deep voice and they work beautifully for classical music and chord melody. Lately I've only played the non-tenor ukes once or twice a month. But I will never let them go.

I have a third tenor that would be a lot of people's best ukulele, but it's not currently in the every day rotation. It's not going anywhere either.

I sold seven ukes in the winter of 2013 and got down to two. Now I'm back to five and that feels like a real luxury to me. I know I could live with just the two tenors.

janeray1940
10-20-2015, 07:07 AM
Do you shed tears over the mountains of money you've spent on dinners out, crappy movies, quickly outdated clothes, soon obsolete electronic devices, junk food, spoiled produce, motel rooms, extortionate health insurance, etc. etc.?

Not actual tears, but... as I've gotten older, I've become a pretty hardcore minimalist, prompted by a move to a 250-square-foot house eight years ago. (You know the old real estate advice, find the best neighborhood you can and if you have to, get the smallest, lousiest house - which I did, and I love it!) It's been a constant lesson in what's necessary and what isn't. What works for one person doesn't necessarily work for others, but I've found that I'm happiest living with less. I don't like fancy restaurants, rarely go to the movies, make most of my clothing, avoid all junk food, and own only the barest minimum of electronics (an iMac and an iPhone - no iPad, no TV, etc.). Live and let live, etc.!

I do, however, have a penchant for quality ukuleles, combined with a passion for buying locally-made and supporting small artisans. In past posts (and there have been hints of it in this post as well) I've sensed a bit of... judgment? envy? both? ... toward those of us who own higher-end ukes, as well as the cost of handmade straps that I've recommended. I hope I'm misinterpreting some of these comments, but if I'm not, my justification for the cost is that I'd rather have one thing that I really love, regardless of price tag as long as I can afford it, than multiples of something that are just okay. But again - that's just what works for me.

(Well... okay... truth be told, once a month as I write a check I come close to shedding real, actual tears over the cost of healthcare in the United States. But I suppose it's better than the alternative! :))

Rllink
10-20-2015, 07:50 AM
Not actual tears, but... as I've gotten older, I've become a pretty hardcore minimalist, prompted by a move to a 250-square-foot house eight years ago. (You know the old real estate advice, find the best neighborhood you can and if you have to, get the smallest, lousiest house - which I did, and I love it!) It's been a constant lesson in what's necessary and what isn't. What works for one person doesn't necessarily work for others, but I've found that I'm happiest living with less. I don't like fancy restaurants, rarely go to the movies, make most of my clothing, avoid all junk food, and own only the barest minimum of electronics (an iMac and an iPhone - no iPad, no TV, etc.). Live and let live, etc.!

I do, however, have a penchant for quality ukuleles, combined with a passion for buying locally-made and supporting small artisans. In past posts (and there have been hints of it in this post as well) I've sensed a bit of... judgment? envy? both? ... toward those of us who own higher-end ukes, as well as the cost of handmade straps that I've recommended. I hope I'm misinterpreting some of these comments, but if I'm not, my justification for the cost is that I'd rather have one thing that I really love, regardless of price tag as long as I can afford it, than multiples of something that are just okay. But again - that's just what works for me.

(Well... okay... truth be told, once a month as I write a check I come close to shedding real, actual tears over the cost of healthcare in the United States. But I suppose it's better than the alternative! :))250 square feet is not a lot of room. I thought my place in PR is small, it has 700 square feet. I find it interesting that you see people being judgmental toward expensive high end ukes and accoutrements, because I see the people who buy expensive high end ukes and accoutrements constantly trying to justify them to people who don't care if they buy them. I guess it is all a matter of perspective.

janeray1940
10-20-2015, 08:18 AM
That's the thing: it's not. We pay 2.5x as much for health care (and 5x as much for the same medications) as the next highest nation, yet get no better care--certainly not universal care. That's simply insupportable for a nation that purports to care about the good of its citizens.

I agree completely, but just to clarify: I meant the *other* alternative - the big sleep! (Speaking from experience, if I didn't have health insurance, I would have died 4 years ago due to being unable to afford a $40,000+ surgery.)

janeray1940
10-20-2015, 08:20 AM
250 square feet is not a lot of room. I thought my place in PR is small, it has 700 square feet. I find it interesting that you see people being judgmental toward expensive high end ukes and accoutrements, because I see the people who buy expensive high end ukes and accoutrements constantly trying to justify them to people who don't care if they buy them. I guess it is all a matter of perspective.

Yep, perspective - I get it. Like I said, I don't even consider my ukes (three Kamakas) high end, especially when I see what people are paying for certain other ukes, but I suppose we all have different needs. Whatever keeps us playing! :)

NewKid
10-20-2015, 11:14 AM
Ubulele: Thank you for "insouciance." And Insouciance of Beaters ​sounds like a great novel.

Nickie
10-21-2015, 02:05 PM
janeray, I must say I admire your willingness and ability to pare yourself and your belongings to 250 ft. We live in about 900 feet, but wouldn't "need" it if we didn't have dogs and cats. We also have way too many things, and I don't mean ukuleles. There are about 2 rooms full of stuff that we need to let go of, including a Dobro, fiddle, and mandolin tat we can't play. I think I was happiest after my kids moved out and I got a 200 square ft apartment. It sure didn't take long to clean it!
We don't do TV either, well Tammy does video games and Nteflix but it doesn't ring my bells. I'll stroke a uke rather than see TV anyday. I think it's cool that you provide a home to three Kamakas! I'd love to get just one!

janeray1940
10-21-2015, 02:45 PM
It sure didn't take long to clean it!


I have to admit - that's part of what I love about small-scale living. I despise housework of all kinds - cleaning, cooking, maintenance, etc. - so the less of that there is to do, the happier I am. And the more time I have to play my ukes :)