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View Full Version : dnt noe what strings to get help plz



lilxlagman13
03-28-2009, 03:23 PM
i have a concert 6 string friend gave it to me n it doznt have any strings tho so i nee some help on some strings to get maybe a link or sumtin

UkeNinja
03-28-2009, 09:32 PM
Well, a link or sumtin is all over the netz. It appears that Worth (http://www.ellisguitars.com.au/worth_6_string_ukelele_strings.html) has a 6-string set, and that would be a solid set to get going. How about checking some online vendors or music stores in your neighborhood?

(Hint: it would be so cool if you would spell out all the wordZ and indicate clearly that you are asking a favor...)

SamWise
03-29-2009, 01:25 AM
It doesn't matter nearly as much as you'd think which strings you buy. Google for 6 string ukulele strings (you also need to know if its a concert, tenor, soprano etc), and order some. You'll know soon whether they suit you. And yeah - we love to help, but we don't love l33t speak all that much ;)

ichadwick
03-29-2009, 05:40 AM
m i th nly 1 who thnkz ths crapee inglish is gettng to much?

Come on! Spell words correctly, for gawd's sake. It's English, not graffiti, and it's not that hard to do it right but apparently very easy to do it poorly if you don't give a damn about communicating effectively. Use proper capitalization and punctuation. Don't make posts that read like an illiterate child's scribble. Please. I can forgive an occasional typo and slip, but this gibberish-talk is vexatious.

Language is a tool, just like your ukulele, and deserves the same respect. Use it properly, not like a broken toy. Used well, language is like a scalpel or an artist's brush, capable of great subtlety and expression. Used poorly... it's the lazy scrawl we see here. Write like you play the uke - or at least like you aspire to play it.

scooterguitar
03-29-2009, 06:15 AM
A little harsh there...
Strings do make a difference IMO.

salukulady
03-29-2009, 06:44 AM
m i th nly 1 who thnkz ths crapee inglish is gettng to much?

Come on! Spell words correctly, for gawd's sake. It's English, not graffiti, and it's not that hard to do it right but apparently very easy to do it poorly if you don't give a damn about communicating effectively. Use proper capitalization and punctuation. Don't make posts that read like an illiterate child's scribble. Please. I can forgive an occasional typo and slip, but this gibberish-talk is vexatious.

Language is a tool, just like your ukulele, and deserves the same respect. Use it properly, not like a broken toy. Used well, language is like a scalpel or an artist's brush, capable of great subtlety and expression. Used poorly... it's the lazy scrawl we see here. Write like you play the uke - or at least like you aspire to play it.Hey Ian, Tell us how you really feel....:D. (I do agree with you, it makes me CRAZY!)

SamWise
03-29-2009, 07:22 AM
Strings do make a difference IMO.

They do, but not such a huge one that you need to agonize about your first set too much. Get some, try them. Don't like 'em much? Try some more

ukantor
03-29-2009, 08:41 AM
I agree with ScooterGuitar - and also with Sam Wise. Strings do make a difference. The "wrong" brand or type can make a uke sound bad, but the only way to find what is right for your uke is to try some. All branded uke strings should be OK, but some will suit your particular uke better than others.

Aquilas are a good starting point.

The form of written communication is interesting. If this UU poster does not know any better, then they have my sympathy, and my support. If they DO know better, WTF are they writing like THAT for?:old:

Ukantor.

scooterguitar
03-29-2009, 09:09 AM
A string is a string, but...
BAsically we all hear things differently, as well asthetics, tones that sound ideal to me might sound like poo to the next person. Trial and error.

ukantor
03-29-2009, 12:12 PM
Dead right ScooterG.

One of my friends always prefers a much brighter, crisper sounding uke than me. Another (yeah, I've got more than one friend!) chooses exactly what I like - slightly warmer sound, more sustain.

Some folk seem happy to play any heap of junk. That's fine too, if they're having fun.

Ukantor.

lilxlagman13
03-29-2009, 02:08 PM
It doesn't matter nearly as much as you'd think which strings you buy. Google for 6 string ukulele strings (you also need to know if its a concert, tenor, soprano etc), and order some. You'll know soon whether they suit you. And yeah - we love to help, but we don't love l33t speak all that much ;)




culd i get tenor strings n put em on a concert?

haolejohn
03-29-2009, 04:13 PM
m i th nly 1 who thnkz ths crapee inglish is gettng to much?

Come on! Spell words correctly, for gawd's sake. It's English, not graffiti, and it's not that hard to do it right but apparently very easy to do it poorly if you don't give a damn about communicating effectively. Use proper capitalization and punctuation. Don't make posts that read like an illiterate child's scribble. Please. I can forgive an occasional typo and slip, but this gibberish-talk is vexatious.

Language is a tool, just like your ukulele, and deserves the same respect. Use it properly, not like a broken toy. Used well, language is like a scalpel or an artist's brush, capable of great subtlety and expression. Used poorly... it's the lazy scrawl we see here. Write like you play the uke - or at least like you aspire to play it.

LOL!! That response made me smile. Kids now a days.

Everyone has given great advise. Anyone that makes strings make a 6 string set. Just take off strings one at a time and replace as you remove them.

haolejohn
03-29-2009, 04:15 PM
culd i get tenor strings n put em on a concert?

I wouldn't but for everyone like me there will be someone to tell you that you can. Normally 6 string ukes come in a tenor size concert strings might be difficult to find. Ask your friend that gave it to you where they got their strings.

SamWise
03-29-2009, 07:10 PM
culd i get tenor strings n put em on a concert?

You could, but why do it?

Captain Google
03-29-2009, 07:24 PM
I wouldn't but for everyone like me there will be someone to tell you that you can. Normally 6 string ukes come in a tenor size concert strings might be difficult to find. Ask your friend that gave it to you where they got their strings.

Also, ask your friend why they didn't give you the strings. :cool:

bbycrts
03-29-2009, 07:26 PM
m i th nly 1 who thnkz ths crapee inglish is gettng to much?

Come on! Spell words correctly, for gawd's sake. It's English, not graffiti, and it's not that hard to do it right but apparently very easy to do it poorly if you don't give a damn about communicating effectively. Use proper capitalization and punctuation. Don't make posts that read like an illiterate child's scribble. Please. I can forgive an occasional typo and slip, but this gibberish-talk is vexatious.

Language is a tool, just like your ukulele, and deserves the same respect. Use it properly, not like a broken toy. Used well, language is like a scalpel or an artist's brush, capable of great subtlety and expression. Used poorly... it's the lazy scrawl we see here. Write like you play the uke - or at least like you aspire to play it.

Bravo, Ian.

Keep the lousy bastardization of the language to the forums that specialize in it. While English is the language used to communicate on this forum, I daresay it's not the native tongue of a good number of the participants. For their sake - and for those of us who appreciate the courtesy to not have our noses rubbed in some adolescent internet gibberish - please take the time to express yourselves clearly.

(Off my soapbox...)

Jon

lilxlagman13
03-29-2009, 08:40 PM
I wouldn't but for everyone like me there will be someone to tell you that you can. Normally 6 string ukes come in a tenor size concert strings might be difficult to find. Ask your friend that gave it to you where they got their strings.



the strings came with it then they broke n he culdnt find any

ichadwick
03-30-2009, 01:20 AM
While English is the language used to communicate on this forum, I daresay it's not the native tongue of a good number of the participants.
I have great respect for anyone who struggles to learn another language. It is difficult and can be embarrassing to express yourself in it adequately to its native speakers (you should hear my broken Spanish some time...). So I am wont to forgive such efforts, even if they fall short of linguistic purity.

But anyone who is a product of the UK or North American school system where English is the primary tongue, or who has studied English in their schooling abroad, can never be forgiven for such idiotic and insulting gibberish as,
"the strings came with it then they broke n he culdnt find any "
or
"culd i get tenor strings n put em on a concert? "
These contain deliberate mistakes in spelling, punctuation, sentence structure and capitalization. It's appalling that anyone older than six would write such lines.

They could only be meant to incite readers - trolling, I suppose it's called - because it's difficult to believe anyone can be that stupid as to not know how to use the elementary rules of their own language. And if you know it's wrong, why else use it except to insult the reader?

I can abide by honest mistakes made in the best effort, but I cannot stomach willful ignorance or insult.

ukantor
03-30-2009, 02:18 AM
I strongly suspect this person is having a laugh. To quote the great John McEnroe, "You cannot be serious!"

Ukantor.

Renaissance-Man
03-30-2009, 03:48 AM
Aquilla's sound pleasing to me on most ukes.

I believe in freedom of expression, in whatever form it takes. I also believe in expressing opinion. I don't believe in absolutism.

ukantor
03-30-2009, 04:08 AM
eye b-leeve 'n mirreculs;)

Renaissance-Man
03-30-2009, 04:23 AM
...and tolerance. :cool:

ukantor
03-30-2009, 04:53 AM
There are limits to my tolerance.:old:

Ukantor.

ichadwick
03-31-2009, 02:51 AM
March 4 was National Grammar Day (http://nationalgrammarday.com/). I think someone here missed the celebrations.

Hmmm. Which now makes me think of a challenge: to write a ukulele song about grammar for next year's event.

buddhuu
03-31-2009, 03:31 AM
We have a few members who post in one or another affected shorthand/patois/txt-speak ... Meh, it's up to them.

My problem is that it's often hard work to figure out what they mean, so I am less likely to be able to answer the few questions to which I might have an answer. To get the most out of your question, IMO, it's not a bad idea to make it as easy to understand as possible.

For people who speak English as a second language... surely it's even harder to follow it when English is rendered in this shorthand?

As I say, it's up to the poster, but I'm a little baffled as to the point of it.


Edit to add: To be fair to all pots and kettles, many of us use slang and/or abbrviations to one or another extent - I certainly do. Best not to condemn too harshly until we are all word perfect in standard 1940s BBC English!

Edit again: because I just spotted that I accidentally abbreviated "abbreviations" !

Kanaka916
03-31-2009, 03:59 AM
OK! Ease up, I believe the point has been made. The discussion about the English language can be continued by creating a new thread in the General Discussion Forum. For now, let's just stick to answering the original question.

ukantor
03-31-2009, 04:34 AM
I guess we can consider ourselves chastised.

The question has been answered.

Ukantor.

buddhuu
03-31-2009, 05:14 AM
OK! Ease up, I believe the point has been made. The discussion about the English language can be continued by creating a new thread in the General Discussion Forum. For now, let's just stick to answering the original question.

Apologies. If my last post was out of line then please delete it. :cool:

The tone wasn't intended to be judgmental or harsh. :o