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jimdville
11-02-2015, 06:32 PM
Stu Fuchs talks improvising and soloing in this week's 3 Questions Interview.
http://www.playukulelebyear.com/3-questions-interview/3-questions-interviewstuart-fuchs

Booli
11-02-2015, 10:12 PM
Great interview!

I really love these '3 Questions' interviews that you do.

Thanks for sharing! :)

Andy Chen
11-02-2015, 10:23 PM
Thanks for sharing! Very interesting indeed.

maxmax
11-03-2015, 01:25 AM
This guys got such a good business plan. Tell your students to make any sound, then tell them that they have to love that sound and repeat. - Done! Send in the next student please. :cool:

Thanks for making these interviews, I also really enjoy them!

Wicked
11-03-2015, 02:16 AM
A bit too much woo-woo for me, but it seems to work for him.

PhilUSAFRet
11-03-2015, 10:14 AM
Look forward to learning from him at the Tampa Bay Ukulele Getaway this coming weekend.

NewKid
11-03-2015, 04:06 PM
Some of the most advanced teaching often get back to the beginning. Stu reminded me of the great Bob Bozman and how he was concentrating how to make sound from the uke as well.

Being in in the moment, free of fear and judgement, and accepting of yourself are just wonderful reminders of how to be as well as how to play. We learn so much from playing.

Thanks for another great interview Jim!

VegasGeorge
11-04-2015, 02:23 AM
Don't forget the candles and incense!

natchez
11-04-2015, 02:59 AM
IMO for those that already have the skill set, improvement and success is often mental. A good analogy is the field of sports psychology. For those of us without the necessary skill set for true mastery it can still be useful to listen and share these thoughts. Even a poor golfer may improve their game by learning to keep themselves in the moment. Thanks for sharing I enjoyed the video.

Rllink
11-04-2015, 03:45 AM
The Bob Ross approach to ukulele. I like it. I'm a huge Bob Ross fan as well. I think there is a big benefit in being one with the uke. In my journey, I've found the ability to hear the sound to be most important, and something I keep working on all the time. Anyone can learn the mechanics of playing the uke. It isn't hard. But hearing the uke is a whole different thing. I think that often times that gets lost in the process, and results in technical expertise, but music lacking in feeling. Thanks for the video.

JustinJ
11-04-2015, 03:54 AM
You make a good point about listening. We're playing a musical instrument and getting a good tone can change a simple song to something very beautiful.

I've taken up classical guitar and it has forced me to listen more to my ukulele playing. I know that I'm more aware of trying to be more expressive in my playing.

The mechanics are important because they allow you economy of motion and the ability to make a good tone. I read something interesting about relaxing while playing. It's often thought that the relaxing part leads to better playing. It's actually learning the mechanics well which allows you to relax in your playing.


The Bob Ross approach to ukulele. I like it. I'm a huge Bob Ross fan as well. I think there is a big benefit in being one with the uke. In my journey, I've found the ability to hear the sound to be most important, and something I keep working on all the time. Anyone can learn the mechanics of playing the uke. It isn't hard. But hearing the uke is a whole different thing. I think that often times that gets lost in the process, and results in technical expertise, but music lacking in feeling. Thanks for the video.

Wicked
11-04-2015, 04:11 AM
I think that people may have misconstrued my earlier comment. Just because I think his method is a bit "esoteric" for me, doesn't mean I am dismissing it as invalid. This man clearly has some chops. He just took a route that would not work for me.

In my youth, I had the opportunity to play guitar with some musical greats. Each of them had a different outlook on how to "get there." Some were "thinkers" others "feelers"... and some were of the "just shut up and play" variety. As a listener, there really is no way to tell how the player arrived.

It's like acting, I suppose. There are people who just get up there and act - and there are people who go through all the "stuff" associated with method acting. It makes no difference to the viewer.

So... in summary. The Stu Fuchs method contains too much woo for me, but it clearly worked for him - and may very well work for you.

...but, I am a kidder by nature, so expect some ribbing from me as you sit there and listen to a single sound for a minute and a half.

JustinJ
11-04-2015, 06:23 AM
Something else to point out about Stu's method. If you do not know the scales or the chords, then you can not employ his methods. If you want to listen to minor chords, then you need to know how to make a minor chord.

There are no shortcuts. You still have to put the work in to learn the scales, chords and techniques. If you want to play hammer ons and pull offs then you need to practice them. Because if you just listen and can not do the technique well, then the tone is going to be made poorly.

Recstar24
11-04-2015, 08:23 AM
I agree with Justin. Stu clearly is an excellent musician with the fundamentals both theory and technique clearly established. I think his method is an excellent way of achieving an extremely high level of performance and creativity; however, there are many points he brings up, like active listening, accepting where one is in their musical journey, creating space between sounds, that are beneficial to all musicians regardless of genre or instrument.

Nickie
11-04-2015, 01:39 PM
I agree with Justin. Stu clearly is an excellent musician with the fundamentals both theory and technique clearly established. I think his method is an excellent way of achieving an extremely high level of performance and creativity; however, there are many points he brings up, like active listening, accepting where one is in their musical journey, creating space between sounds, that are beneficial to all musicians regardless of genre or instrument.

I like this. I don't know what "woo woo" means, but I love Stu Fuchs, his teaching methods are beyond reproach. He's a joy to be around too, his energy facilitates relaxed learning. I've seen him twice, I can't wait to see him again, and learn some more stuff!

PeteyHoudini
11-04-2015, 04:21 PM
Found this great!!!

Petey

AndrewKuker
11-04-2015, 08:19 PM
You can find scales and chords everywhere. How to take that and start expressing yourself musically, having fun and freedom with it, is a hurdle many struggle with.

Stu explains it from a less analytical place and in a more intuitive way that's naturally within us. It comes from all we have heard and sounds that bring us joy, or express what words can not. Most musicians approach music from this space but it’s not easy to explain or teach like a song or technique. This was one of the best lessons I have seen on taking what we have learned and using it to start really make music.

Just good thoughts. Mahalo for sharing! (I do think better audio would make it more impactful. I suppose it's not so relevant when the ideas are the point)