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View Full Version : What dollars do you call a cheap uke, a mid range uke, or a expensive uke.



AussieUku
11-12-2015, 08:44 AM
He is a question I like to ask.

I like to see what your feelings are on the price of ukuleles...

So what price range would you call a cheap uke...

What price range would you call a mid range uke...

And what price range would you call a expensive uke...

Btw the last ukulele I bought I would call just going on mid range I paid $270 Australian for it.

spookelele
11-12-2015, 09:04 AM
If you got a Kamaka for $400 that might be considered cheap.
Unless all you have is $50, then that seems expensive.

Cheap and expensive are relative terms to what value you hold for it.

Pueo
11-12-2015, 09:07 AM
I think this has been done before on this board.
For me personally, I think <$100 is cheap (inexpensive)
<$400 is mid-range
>$600 is expensive

For me personally, I have some expensive ukuleles, and I have a couple of mid-range that are every bit as nice as the expensive ones.

Different folks have different budgets.

I really think that >$1000 is what most would consider expensive, but on my budget, that figure is lower! :D

Camsuke
11-12-2015, 09:19 AM
It also depends on which currency you are talking about. We are definitely at a big disadvantage in Australia when we buy in USD, then add the shipping, duties & taxes.

pbagley
11-12-2015, 09:37 AM
I will submit an opinion:

Cheap : Under $50
Inexpensive: Under $150
MidRange: $150 to $600

All in USD,

Cheap means that it is not expected to play in tune or sound good.
Inexpensive means it is expected to play in tune and to have a reasonable quality of sound proportional to the cost.
MidRange means solid sound board, perhaps solid woods all the way through. Intonation should be very good, and tone/timbre proportional to the price.

I hope that helps.

RichM
11-12-2015, 09:39 AM
It also depends on which currency you are talking about. We are definitely at a big disadvantage in Australia when we buy in USD, then add the shipping, duties & taxes.

The cheapest uke I ever bought was in Australia! I bought a plastic one for AUS$29 at Allans Billy Hyde in Brisbane so I'd have something to play whilst travelling. No great tone monster for sure, but it was quite playable and stayed in tune. Gave it away to the daughter of a friend before departing and I believe she still plays it.

Rodney.
11-12-2015, 09:51 AM
Cheap: less than 5% of my paycheck
Midrange: between 5% and 20% of my paycheck
Expensive: more than 20% of my paycheck

I get my paycheck every 28th of the month. All my ukes are cheap.

janeray1940
11-12-2015, 10:00 AM
Cheap: less than 5% of my paycheck
Midrange: between 5% and 20% of my paycheck
Expensive: more than 20% of my paycheck


My criteria is similar-but-different:

Expensive - equal to one month's rent or more
Midrange - anywhere between $100 and under one month's rent
Cheap - under $100

Worth adding - although based on MSRP, all of my ukes fall in the "expensive" range, I've never paid full price for any of them (and have only once paid more than the equivalent of one month's rent for a ukulele, which I no longer have - I liked some of the "cheaper" ones better!).

Also worth adding, I guess, is the fact that rent is exorbitant where I live :)

AussieUku
11-12-2015, 11:06 AM
Thanks everyone for your replies so far...In Australia we always pay more for ukuleles unless you are in the right place at the right time and pick up a bargain...

Also sorry if this kind of thread has been done before... I was just seeing what people thought of there ukes whether they were cheap, mid range or expensive, as long as we are all happy with what we own and play that's all that matters.

stevepetergal
11-12-2015, 11:24 AM
Cheap - Under $100 (USD)
Mid-range - $100-$500
Upper range $500-$1,000
Expensive - above that

70sSanO
11-12-2015, 11:39 AM
Cheap - Under $100 (USD)
Mid-range - $100-$500
Upper range $500-$1,000
Expensive - above that

Since I thought this was pretty close to mine, I decided just to steal and modify. I made a distinction between Cheap and Inexpensive only becuase the words are sometimes not synonymous. I'd probably bump a range or two up a tad.

Cheap - Under $100 (USD)
Inexpensive - $100 - $300
Mid-range - $300-$700
Upper range $700-$1,300
Expensive - above that (pretty good assessment since expensive can run well into 4 digits).

Some of this has to do with what Pono's cost when trying to place the price of different models... also Martin and the "K" brands. Opio models are mid-range.

John

plunker
11-12-2015, 11:53 AM
I paid $89.00 for a Kala LA T
I paid about $ 325.00 for a PONO MTD used.
For me the Pono was expensive and the Kala was med range.
My first ule was a $ 29.00 Savannah Soprano. I thought it cheap until it led me to by all the other ukes. Now I consider it a very expensive $ 29.00 but worth every penny and then some. I would have spent the money on my other hobby.

farmerjones
11-12-2015, 12:33 PM
Kinda subjective.. if I make a lot of money, obviously, I'd quote higher prices. I don't, so I think my prices below are reasonable. I guess that's kinda the point of this exercise.

Also, what spookelele said; if I managed to snag a $2000 uke for $700 I'd say that's cheap!

Without further ado:
Cheap: less than $60
Mid Range: $61-$350
Higher End: $351-$800
Expensive: $801+

hollisdwyer
11-12-2015, 02:06 PM
Yes, "kinda subjective". My only comment is that as time has gone on and I have acquired finer instruments, I have been more willing to spend more on a Ukulele. I still have a concept of what cheap, mid-range and expensive is but that is perceived within the context of my current earning capacity. When that changes, as it will, I am sure I will rethink those definitions.

Buiietbob
11-12-2015, 02:27 PM
My daddy said nothing is worth than you are willing to pay for it,New car selling for $$$$$$ I am only willing to pay 50$$.I keep my 50$$ and WALK away.The first string instrument I ever bought new was a Makala concert uke.Less than a hundred dollar bill.I had to really reach to buy it to but ,but after playing every uke in the store it sounded the best. I might have paid a little more to have it but that would really hurt.Any how I belive it is up to what you think.

hollisdwyer
11-12-2015, 02:36 PM
The first guitar I owned when I was 15 was terrible. It did however convince me that my desire to play guitar wasn't just a passing fancy. So I worked all summer and saved every penny I could. By my birthday in late August I had enough to purchase a Martin. One of the least expensive Martin's but still a fine instrument. That was when I learned that value wasn't measured by the number of dollars you spent.

PeteyHoudini
11-12-2015, 02:37 PM
As for new ukes...

Without further ado: (borrowed text from a previous poster) hehe

Cheapish: less than $50
Cheap: less than $100 to $50
Mid Range/Acceptable: $100-$500
Higher End & Expensive: $501 - $5000

Rakelele
11-12-2015, 07:49 PM
My own destinction runs along the value offered rather than the price they cost. With this compass, I would consider most laminate Ukes to be entry-level, a solid wood construction from a renowned production line midrange, and a luthier-made instrument with customized features high-end.

In relation to price, I would say that you get a decent midrange instrument starting at $300 USD, High-end begins somewhere south of 1K. Best value, to me, is either available in the range from 300-1200, or 2000-3000.

Brian1
11-12-2015, 08:53 PM
under $40 cheap. over $180 expensive. Over $1k Silly.

hollisdwyer
11-12-2015, 09:48 PM
My own destinction runs along the value offered rather than the price they cost. With this compass, I would consider most laminate Ukes to be entry-level, a solid wood construction from a renowned production line midrange, and a luthier-made instrument with customized features high-end.

In relation to price, I would say that you get a decent midrange instrument starting at $300 USD, High-end begins somewhere south of 1K. Best value, to me, is either available in the range from 300-1200, or 2000-3000.

Well said. That's the only definition that I agree with. You made the point better than I.

mm stan
11-13-2015, 01:56 AM
To me,
0 to 200 cheap
200 to 500 lower mid level
500 to 750 mid level
750 to 1200 premimum
1200 to 2000 semi custom
2000 to 3000 custom
3000 up high end customs or rare vintage

kkimura
11-13-2015, 02:29 AM
I'd have to apply the "guilt-o-meter" to answer this.

Cheap = "No worries, this is cheaper than dinner out for two at a nice restaurant honey."
Middle = "Sorry, I won't do this again."
High = "O-god how am I going to hide this when I get home."

May this is the "wife-o-meter"?

Nickie
11-13-2015, 02:55 AM
I'd have to apply the "guilt-o-meter" to answer this.

Cheap = "No worries, this is cheaper than dinner out for two at a nice restaurant honey."
Middle = "Sorry, I won't do this again."
High = "O-god how am I going to hide this when I get home."


May this is the "wife-o-meter"?


LOL, I love this!
Yeah, to me "cheap" means "why did I waste my money on this piece of junk?"
Expensive means, "how in the heck am I gonna pay for this and not be embarrassed to say how much I paid for it."
I don't make a dime playing uke, so to me, expensive=just plain silly.
My ukes cost less than $300, so I guess that's mid range around here. My wife's tenor uke cost $139, and she's tickled with it. That's priceless. Her UBass I got for her birthday was mid range, and she's tickled pink, I'd call that priceless too.

Booli
11-13-2015, 03:12 AM
I'd have to apply the "guilt-o-meter" to answer this.

Cheap = "No worries, this is cheaper than dinner out for two at a nice restaurant honey."
Middle = "Sorry, I won't do this again."
High = "O-god how am I going to hide this when I get home."

May this is the "wife-o-meter"?

LOL. That's a great way of framing it. :)

UkerDanno
11-13-2015, 04:45 AM
I'd call cheap under $100, that doesn't mean no good. For a little over $60, you can get a Dolphin or Shark from UkeRepublic with good strings and setup, that might be the best deal around!

Mid range would be $300-$500, for that kind of money, you can get something that probably sounds as good as anything for lots more.

Expensive would be over $1,000, although for just slightly over, you can get a really good instrument, probably as good as anything for thousands more sans decorations.

I have one cheap uke, my first and I just grabbed it off the wall this morning and although it hadn't been played for over a month, it was in tune and plays and sounds pretty good.

I have 4 in the range between cheap and mid and 1 that retails for over expensive, although I got it "cheap" (between the mid and expensive range).

CdnSouthpaw
11-13-2015, 10:33 AM
I'll say

Cheap 0-$150
Decent $151-400
Serious $401-800
Professional $801-1400
Connoisseur $1401-2000
Expensive $2000 and above.

Tootler
11-13-2015, 10:54 AM
I'm in the UK so my numbers are a bit different.

Cheap up to 50 (GBP)
Inexpensive up to 150
Mid Range up to 500
Expensive over 500

Two of my ukes are cheap plastic ones which I use as loan ukes for my uke group.
The rest are mid range.

Prices here are generally quoted inclusive of tax so to get a US Dollar equivalent you need to deduct 20% for tax then multiply by 1.5 (based on current - $ exchange rate)

One good thing about ukuleles is you can get a decent instrument with good intonation much more cheaply than most other instruments though I've noticed plastics are bringing down the price of entry level wind instruments. Adding to that, my plastic ones sound and play much better than you might expect given the price.

I've spent a lot more on my recorders over the years than I have on ukuleles and my most recent recorder cost me 600 and that is definitely mid range.

PereBourik
11-13-2015, 12:27 PM
Cheap: Any ukulele I can afford.
Expensive: Any ukulele costing more than that.

I have both cheap and expensive ukuleles.