PDA

View Full Version : Accompanying other instruments?



kmathis09
11-16-2015, 03:21 PM
I just got a uke for my birthday and I'm having some sucess in learning to play. Every year my family plays music at our reunion and I want to be a part of it next year. So my question is - How do I accompany guitar? Are the chords they use the same ones I am to use, or will I just need to automatically transpose? I know some of the songs they always play, but if I learn them on the uke will they sound good no matter how the guitar plays them?

Nickie
11-16-2015, 04:05 PM
The chord shapes are the same. Only the names are different. You can read music from the same page as a guitarist. As long as you both play a G chord, for example, you will sound good together.

Pirate Jim
11-16-2015, 08:36 PM
I'm currently putting a few songs together for a Christmas concert with a guitarist - the two together are a good combination! As Nickie says, don't worry about transposing or anything, just both play the same chords for the same song and all will be well.

bazmaz
11-17-2015, 01:00 AM
Chords are chords - not matter what instrument you are playing. If someone is playing a song that requires a G chord on the guitar - play the G chord on the ukulele. The fingerings are different, but the chord is still the chord.

So if you already know a song on guitar - lets say for example it has a progression of C, F and G - playing C, F and G on a ukulele will match the guitar - the register is different, but the chord is still the same.

The more advanced alternative would be to work out harmony progressions to counterpoint the guitar, but I suspect that is not what you are getting at.

Rllink
11-17-2015, 03:26 AM
My voice coach used to play melodies on the piano, while I would strum the chords and sing. It helped me with my timing and getting the pitch. Like everyone else says, a chord is a chord. I play with people who play guitars, baritones, and banjos, and while we don't all just strum chords together, we do all play off the same page. So if you are comfortable strumming chords, don't get confused if someone else goes off on a tangent. They are still playing with you, they are just putting some flavor into it. Just keep doing what you are doing, it will all come together in the end. That is the fun thing about playing with others, holding up your part of it. By the way, if you get lost, don't panic and quit. Mute your strings, and keep up the rhythm until you figure out where you are again. A lot of times you can catch up the next verse, or when you get to the chorus, so hang in there no matter what. In a family setting like that, you can miss a chord or two, and no one will beat you up for it. Heck, you can miss a chord or two, and most of the time no one even notices. I'm excited for you.

vinceherman
11-17-2015, 04:15 AM
My brother plays a bass. Not a bass uke, an upright bass.
We play together. I print off lead sheets with the melody, the lyrics and the chords.
I strum the chords and sing. He walks through the chord in a very jazzy way.
The result is quite enjoyable.

kmathis09
11-17-2015, 08:59 AM
Thank you. I'm used to playing a baritone horn, not strings so this is all new to me. But your responses have helped. I guess my next move is to simply learn the chord shapes and strumming patterns and stop focusing on just learning specific songs. I get hung up on specifics a lot. lol

Tootler
11-21-2015, 11:45 AM
[...]

I guess my next move is to simply learn the chord shapes and strumming patterns and stop focusing on just learning specific songs. I get hung up on specifics a lot. lol

No reason why you can't do both.

Work on songs and use them to learn to transition between chords cleanly and work out strumming patterns that fit the natural rhythm of the song. From time to time choose songs that have a chord new to you so you are learning to move through progressions, learning to play rhythmically and learning new chords. At the same time, you're building a repertoire of songs.

Louis0815
11-22-2015, 08:58 AM
I'm used to playing a baritone horn, not strings so this is all new to me.String instruments are usually not "transposing" instruments like many of the wind instruments. An A on a string instruments is always a "real" A resonating at 440Hz (or whatever ref. point you chose) - not the transposing nightmares you have with winds... (Bb clarinet has to play B to get the same frequency, etc)