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Jim Hanks
11-20-2015, 03:19 AM
http://www.ikmultimedia.com/products/irigacoustic/

OK, who's gonna be the first to try this on their ukes? Looks interesting. I was not real impressed with the original iRig as it generated a lot of crosstalk on the headphone jack but maybe they've improved the circuitry over the past few years.

we tigers
11-20-2015, 03:52 AM
it sure looks interesting!

UkieOkie
11-20-2015, 04:09 AM
$49 bucks is great if it works. Am I reading it right that the software AND mic are $49? If that think delivers that would be pretty cool.

Trevor

DownUpDave
11-20-2015, 04:12 AM
Thanks for the heads up Jim. I have ZERO knowledge about anything electronic so here are some noob questions. I read this back to front and can't figure out if I can just plug that iRig Acoutic mic directly into my amp. If not what do I have to do to be able to do that. I have a number of ukes without pick ups and it would be a blast to try them all out through my Fishman loudbox mini.

Thanks
Dave

UkieOkie
11-20-2015, 04:17 AM
I could be confused but I got the idea it was not to go to a regular amp, just to the IOS based recording software IE and Iphone or Ipad. I am also tech-deficient.

DownUpDave
11-20-2015, 04:27 AM
I could be confused but I got the idea it was not to go to a regular amp, just to the IOS based recording software IE and Iphone or Ipad. I am also tech-deficient.

It looks like there is a splitter type jack. Maybe it has to go into your phone or ipad first that has the app and then into an amplifer. If all it does is record then I am not interested.

hollisdwyer
11-20-2015, 04:58 AM
There are a few iRig devices. They are analogue/digital interfaces that allows you to plug your Uke pickup into a iPhone or iPad ( usually using Garage Band as the recorder/mixing desk). The one I have caters for other inputs besides the standard quarter inch phono jack.

Jim Hanks
11-20-2015, 08:49 AM
It looks like there is a splitter type jack. Maybe it has to go into your phone or ipad first that has the app and then into an amplifer. If all it does is record then I am not interested.


There are a few iRig devices. They are analogue/digital interfaces that allows you to plug your Uke pickup into a iPhone or iPad

This one is different. It is not for plugging in a pickup. It is a clip on microphone. DUD has the right idea. The mic input goes into the app for processing, effects, etc, and then that signal comes back out for either headphone listening or as a line level output to a mixer, speaker, or whatever. Putting that signal into a regular amp would probably require a direct box, depending on the amp, but would not be required as the app is the amp, if that makes sense. Also it does not appear possible to take the mic input directly to an external amp but I'm guessing that would sound like crap anyway. I'm guessing you need the app as a preamp,etc. to get a useable sound.

When used in this way it probably works well. The example videos look fairly impressive but those are under very controlled conditions. But I wonder how it behaves "in the real world". For example, when I had the original iRig, I wanted to play a backing track on the iPad, play my instrument into the iRig and record the instrument in an iPad recording app. The problem was that the backing track playing through the headphone fed back into the input (at a low level but still) so the backing track was faintly audible in my recorded instrument track. Not acceptable. That is why I moved to interfaces like hollisdwyer mentioned that input through the 30-pin connector and there is no possibility of feedback.

But again, that was several years ago with a different device. Hopefully they have solved this problem.

greenie44
11-20-2015, 09:14 AM
So it looks like this only delivers input to an iDevice. Unfortunately, that rules it out for me. I do some recording with my iPad, but most of the time I go to my PC.

pritch
11-20-2015, 09:19 AM
For example, when I had the original iRig, I wanted to play a backing track on the iPad, play my instrument into the iRig and record the instrument in an iPad recording app. The problem was that the backing track playing through the headphone fed back into the input (at a low level but still) so the backing track was faintly audible in my recorded instrument track. Not acceptable.


I have an original iRig here but I just used it in basic mode: guitar in, headphones out. I thought it was good value for money - provided you already had an iPad.
It hadn't been used in a couple of years, but a month or two back I plugged the Pono TE in and it worked fine.

Jim Hanks
11-20-2015, 09:46 AM
So it looks like this only delivers input to an iDevice. Unfortunately, that rules it out for me. I do some recording with my iPad, but most of the time I go to my PC.
What's your PC interface? You could run the line out from the iPad to the PC. Or if recorded on the iPad you could export the audio files from that into your PC DAW.

Jim Hanks
11-20-2015, 09:52 AM
I have an original iRig here but I just used it in basic mode: guitar in, headphones out. I thought it was good value for money - provided you already had an iPad.
It hadn't been used in a couple of years, but a month or two back I plugged the Pono TE in and it worked fine.
Right. You're likely still getting a small amount of feedback but it's a low level and "the same" instrument so probably not very noticeable. If anything it probably comes across as a slight chorusing or comb filter effect

Booli
12-27-2015, 12:30 AM
http://www.ikmultimedia.com/products/irigacoustic/

OK, who's gonna be the first to try this on their ukes? Looks interesting. I was not real impressed with the original iRig as it generated a lot of crosstalk on the headphone jack but maybe they've improved the circuitry over the past few years.

The price has been fluctuating on various sites over the past week (including Amazon and B&H).

I just ordered one from B&H Photo for $42 and had to pad the order to $49 to get the free expedited shipping, and should have it in hand by Tues Dec 29 if all goes well.

It's not a big deal to come up with $7 worth of items (I ordered a bunch of 1/4" female jacks @ $1.19 ea. that I will use for some other projects).

If they have still not fixed the crosstalk, it's going back.

Also if the mic sounds bad without the 'Amplitube Acoustic' app's modeling and other processing, i.e. direct into Garageband or Auria on iOS, then I might also send it back unless I can use either Inter-App-Audio or Audiobus to route the output of Amplitube into Garageband for iOS or to Auria for iOS.

I will post a follow-up and possible video once I have a chance to run it through it's paces for a full test.

If it works well (and sounds GOOD), this could be the holy grail that lowers the barrier to entry for those new to recording, instead of messing with external mics, mic placement, which preamp and interface to use, and how to set it all up, and the associated costs.

Another benefit from a device like this is that you can easily move it to another instrument without having to mess with velcro, double-stick tape or funtak putty since it mounts to the soundhole. I like this idea and hope it's not too big on a uke (it looks big on the uke in the photos)

Also - to answer another question that was posted, it says on the IK Multimedia site that the output jack is a headphone/line-out jack. This tells me that about the impedance and output voltage (low impedance [being 250 Ohm to 650 Ohm] and likely about 700mv to 1v peak-to-peak) and if your amplifier has an 1/8" or RCA input for an mp3-player, you could run this into your amp.

If you run it into the guitar input, you will likely not have enough volume or gain unless the amp is turned up very high due to the iRig Acoustic's impedance and voltage being LOW impedance and a guitar being more of a HIGH impedance conntection, typically 1kOhm to 10kohm.

Also, keep in mind that unless your amp is a 'stereo' amp, you will only hear a mono output. In this regard your iOS or Android device would function in place of any guitar effects pedals using an app like Amplitube, JamUp Pro or ToneStack and the plentiful effects therein.

Using one of the new pedals for mobile devices like the IK BlueBoard, you can have footswitch control of your effects just like a guitar pedalboard. Also if you have the LoopyHD app, I expect that you could use the BlueBoard to control it and have a nice looper setup on your mobile device that rivals many of the dedicated looper pedals that cost $$$ for the better ones.

But you don't need this iRig Acoustic device to use the IK BlueBoard if you already have an interface to get the sound into your mobile device. The BlueBoard works via BlueTooth wireless connection (like your earpiece) and emulates various keys from a QWERTY keyboard which you can setup a KEYMAP inside whichever app you are using and tell it which footswitches are assigned to which function....but I digress....sorry. :(

:music:

Booli
12-27-2015, 10:19 AM
So it looks like this only delivers input to an iDevice. Unfortunately, that rules it out for me. I do some recording with my iPad, but most of the time I go to my PC.


I found a link to this device on the iRig forums that may solve this exact problem:

NRG Tech TRRS CTIA / AHJ/ 4 Pole USB Audio Adapter

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00O1FH37S

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61AEb0wc-ML._SL1438_.jpg

The Amazon reviews look promising and it's cheap enough. The problem with a standard PC sound card is you need to have a jack that accepts the 1/8" TRRS male plug. On mobile devices this combines both the input of a mic and a headphone output into a single connector.

On most PCs (and older Macs) there is a separate connector for the mic input (TS or TRS) and a separate connector for the headphone or speaker output (TRS). Also on all of these devices, the mic input jack supplies what is known as 'plug-in power' (which was originally the standard for an electret mic element, typically anywhere from 1.5 to 4.5 volts DC) and this same power is required for the iRig Acoustic to work on iOS, Android or Mac.

MEMS microphones typically require 1.5v DC to 3v DC.

My thinking is that this little USB-to-TRRS adapter acts as an additional sound card for your Mac or PC, and might let us use the iRig Acoustic on computers that do not have the TRRS jack already in the existing built-in sound card.

It's not a big deal to have multiple USB or Firewire/Thunderbolt audio interfaces on your desktop/laptop computer. I do it all the time, and you just have to select the interface you want to use in either/both your audio control panel of the System Preferences, and/or in your recording program. It's not really complicated at all IMHO.

On the Mac, you can even combine multiple devices into what Apple calls an 'Aggregate Audio Device' via the Audio-MIDI control program, and doing so lets you expose just a single device with multiple I/O connections to your DAW or recording app. It is VERY easy to setup. This is similar to using the JACK Audio Toolkit on Linux (which is free).

I am no longer a Windows user since 2005, so I am not sure what virtual audio patchbay software is available on Windows now, so you'll have to search that one.

I have not tried this NRG Tech unit myself as I've yet to receive my iRig Acoustic, but for only $20, I think it's worth a shot.

Hope this helps. :)

Ukulelerick9255
12-27-2015, 10:32 AM
Question, how would you record voice also on an iPad using this device, can you use the irig vocal mic at the same time?

Booli
12-27-2015, 11:06 AM
Question, how would you record voice also on an iPad using this device, can you use the irig vocal mic at the same time?

Since the TRRS connection in the headphone port's mic input is mono (i.e. single channel) I do not think this would be easy. They have another product called the iRig Mic Lav, which is a lavalier microphone, and there is a function that allows you to daisy-chain two of them to record two voices at the same time.

See here:

http://www.ikmultimedia.com/products/irigmiclav/

Since the daisy-chain function of the iRig Mic Lav passes power and audio to the upstream device, it 'may' be possible to use an iRig Mic Lav going into the iOS device first, and then plug in the iRig Acoustic into that devices headphone port with the switch set to the 'input' setting.

If in fact this works for both audio and power, you would still only have a single mono channel in your recording.

For recording in either stereo or with two discrete audio channels, you would need a device that connects to either the 30pin or Lightning connector. Or a USB audio interface going into either the iPad Camera Connection Kit, or USB-to-Lightning adapter dongle.

There are MANY 2-channel audio interfaces on the market now for both iOS and USB connections, way too many to list here.

If you are multi-tracking, you could use the iRig Acoustic for the uke/guitar track, and then disconnect it and use the iRig Mic (or similar) to record a vocal track, but this would not let you sing and play at the same time. If your intent is to sing and play simultaneously for Seasons videos, etc, you might be better off with any of over dozen mics designed for mobile devices or computers.

I use an Apogee MiC which I like very much and it sounds great. For recording any non-acoustic instruments like an electric guitar, bass, etc, I will disconnect the Apogee MiC and plug in my Apogee JAM.

OTOH, If I want to record my singing and playing at the same time, each to a separate audio channel, I will use an AKG Perception 200 large diaphragm condenser mic, and my instrument via a standard guitar cable, both each plugged into it's own channel on my ART USB Dual Tube Pre interface connected to the iPad Camera Connection Kit. All of which sound great and are easy to use, but like I said, there are MANY options.

I do not know if the MEMS mic inside the iRig Acoustic would give you a usable sound if say you placed it on a table or desk in front of you and sang and played into it. Likely you will have to turn up the input recording gain which will add too much noise/hiss to the recording and would be detrimental to the audio quality. I could be wrong, but I plan to test this idea once I get my iRig Acoustic in a few days and will report back with the results.

Ukulele Eddie
12-29-2015, 04:55 AM
Booli - I look forward to your usual thoughtful review when you get this. I'm quite intrigued. Happy New Year!

Booli
12-29-2015, 01:07 PM
Booli - I look forward to your usual thoughtful review when you get this. I'm quite intrigued. Happy New Year!


Thanks Eddie! Happy New year to you too!

It came today as promised. I played with it a little bit. First impressions are good. It seems to be a very sensitive mic, i.e., providing a very hot signal. More testing needs to be done though.

I plan to do a comprehensive review that includes audio comparisons between the built-in mic on the iPad3, the Apogee MiC, and of course the iRig Acoustic.

I will also be recording clean with no effects and then compare that to running it through the suggested Amplitube Acoustic iOS app to see if and how much of a difference it makes and try to demonstrate what you get for $10 with that app.

It's going to take some time, so I might be able to have something up by the weekend.

I'll post back here with a link to the video and audio samples...so stay tuned! :)

photoshooter
12-29-2015, 01:35 PM
I played with mine briefly and yes it did seem "hot" but as soon as I turned on the amp in Amplitube it came right down. Of course I'm waiting for your impressions since my standards are much lower than yours ;)
The only other thing for now is that I need to put a shim in the clip so it hugs my soundboard tightly. Mine was sliding around a bit which made it sound like I was wrestling an alligator (I'm not exactly a graceful uke player). Come to think of it, I'm not much of an alligator wrestler either...

Booli
12-29-2015, 01:49 PM
I played with mine briefly and yes it did seem "hot" but as soon as I turned on the amp in Amplitube it came right down. Of course I'm waiting for your impressions since my standards are much lower than yours ;)
The only other thing for now is that I need to put a shim in the clip so it hugs my soundboard tightly. Mine was sliding around a bit which made it sound like I was wrestling an alligator (I'm not exactly a graceful uke player). Come to think of it, I'm not much of an alligator wrestler either...

On the one uke I tested it so far (my tenor Koa Fluke), I have an iPhone screen protector acting as a pickguard, and it was quite a snug fit. You might want to try that. I got a 5-pack of them at the dollar store a while back, and the adhesive does not mar the wood or leave a residue, but may have trouble sticking to a matte or satin finish.

Aside from that you could try some tape that has a low-tack adhesive, like painter's tape or 'magic tape' (not cellophane) Scotch tape, and if needed you could layer a few strips of tape to get the thickness you need.

OTHER kinds of tape will leave residue behind (Duct tape, packaging tape), and might have something in the adhesive that would otherwise be detrimental to the finish when removed.

[added] Or you could try a few small strips of tape on the underside of the pick-shaped plastic part, if you opt not to apply tape to your uke(s)...

I will test this device on several other instruments, as well as with routing the output into an amp from the line-out/headphone port - for if that test goes well, the iRig Acoustic could be used live in place of a permanently installed pickup (and moved across to other ukes/guitars as needed), but I'm not sure if/how much feedback there will be...

more later :shaka:

Tootler
12-30-2015, 05:49 AM
Looks a neat design but it would be much more generally useful if it terminated in a standard 1/4" jack so you could plug into a pre-amp or mixer then into your PA or recording device.

I really don't get this recording through iPad or other tablets. They are useful gadgets and do work quite well for "quick and dirty" jobs but it seems to me not really suitable for serious audio work, even at the kind of amateur level I'm at.


Another benefit from a device like this is that you can easily move it to another instrument without having to mess with velcro, double-stick tape or funtak putty since it mounts to the soundhole. I like this idea and hope it's not too big on a uke (it looks big on the uke in the photos)


I use one of these (http://www.microvox.co.uk/banjopage.htm) on my acoustic ukes. It's a minature condenser mic and works well. You need to use one of their psu's but you just clip or tie it to your belt and take a standard instrument cable to your amp or recorder. OK, you have to fix it with velcro but I don't see that as a big deal. I have a little piece of velcro on most of my ukes and I can quickly move it from one uke to another. It captures the tone of your instrument better than any piezo pickup. If you turn it up too much you will get feedback but I've not really had any problems with feedback and think it's more generally useful than the iRig device as your not tied to using an iPad.

There are other miniature mics designed for acoustic instruments available as well.

Ukulelerick9255
12-30-2015, 06:29 AM
I just bought the irig duo pro.....two jacks for both mic and uke so I can sing and play at the same time....just learning to use it and looking for the best DAW to use it with, so far Auria pro looks like the best Daw.

Jim Hanks
12-30-2015, 05:25 PM
I really don't get this recording through iPad or other tablets. They are useful gadgets and do work quite well for "quick and dirty" jobs but it seems to me not really suitable for serious audio work, even at the kind of amateur level I'm at.
I guess it depends on what you mean by "serious". I've done many projects entirely on iPad/iPhone including recording, MIDI sequencing, mixing, and even through the "mastering" stage. Admittedly, Propellerhead Reason on my PC has more "power" but it isn't always needed.

greenie44
12-31-2015, 12:59 AM
I guess it depends on what you mean by "serious". I've done many projects entirely on iPad/iPhone including recording, MIDI sequencing, mixing, and even through the "mastering" stage. Admittedly, Propellerhead Reason on my PC has more "power" but it isn't always needed.

Thanks for another DAW to look at. Personally, I switched to Reaper about 6 months ago and am extremely happy with it as I continue to learn all the features and functionality in there.

DownUpDave
12-31-2015, 01:47 AM
Just a heads up for Android users ( both my phone and tablet ) there is NOT an app for AmpliTube Acoustic in Google Play. There is only the iRig UA on Google play which is completely different.

I got this as a Christmas gift and as I am a complete techno nob ( know zero less 10%) I need some advice. How can I make this work without the app through my Android phone or tablet. I really just wanted to be able to plug into an amp so all my ukes without pick ups could be played amplified through my Fisman loudbox mini. I am not really that concerned about recording, just playing amplified.

Jim Hanks
12-31-2015, 02:01 AM
How can I make this work without the app through my Android phone or tablet. I really just wanted to be able to plug into an amp so all my ukes without pick ups could be played amplified through my Fisman loudbox mini. I am not really that concerned about recording, just playing amplified.
Sounds like post #21 has a better solution for that setup. But I'm curious what happens if you just plug it into a headphone jack like on a boom box or perhaps the Line In on a computer. If you get any sound at all, you could probably use an appropriate direct box between the device and the amp. But if this were a viable option I'd think IK would say something about it. I haven't looked on their website though.

Tootler
12-31-2015, 10:56 AM
I guess it depends on what you mean by "serious". I've done many projects entirely on iPad/iPhone including recording, MIDI sequencing, mixing, and even through the "mastering" stage. Admittedly, Propellerhead Reason on my PC has more "power" but it isn't always needed.

I understand that it's possible to do all these things but tablets just don't seem to me the best tool for the job. I find them very handy for some things and I am gradually transferring my sheet music and song sheets on to my iPad. I have audio, video and photo editing apps on my iPad but compared with a PC (of whatever platform), I find them clunky. I also think that the memory is a limitation, though you can always transfer completed files elsewhere with more capacity.

My own personal choice for recording is to use a stand alone multi track recorder where I record and mostly mix then transfer to the PC for finishing. That's a personal choice and for many others an interface to a DAW is the preferred choice.

Jim Hanks
12-31-2015, 01:54 PM
I have audio, video and photo editing apps on my iPad but compared with a PC, I find them clunky. I also think that the memory is a limitation

My own personal choice for recording is to use a stand alone multi track recorder where I record and mostly mix then transfer to the PC for finishing. That's a personal choice and for many others an interface to a DAW is the preferred choice.
Yeah, no wrong answer, whatever works for you. I had a small stand alone recorder years ago and couldn't do much with it except initial recording before transfer to PC. The iPad is limited but sometimes that can be a virtue. And it's a lot more portable than even a laptop.

Tootler
01-01-2016, 03:53 AM
...The iPad is limited but sometimes that can be a virtue. And it's a lot more portable than even a laptop.

Both good points. One reason why my sheet music is going on to the iPad. The same is true of my little Tascam DP006. It's essentially an updated digital version of the old tape based portastudio. Highly portable - it even has a screw in the base for a camera tripod. The built in mics are not bad either. You can record, edit tracks and mix on it but there's no built in FX. You either have to use hardware effects or transfer to a PC to add them. For recording vocals and acoustic instruments it's great.

Ukulelerick9255
01-01-2016, 07:55 AM
It seems I have a problem, if I record into my iPad there's no way to export or download onto my PC if I want to burn a CD...it seems I have two options, buy a Mac desktop or laptop or buy an android tablet to record into instead of my iPad. Thoughts, suggestions? I'm told the android tablets have some real issues with music recording in terms of signal delay and lag issues.

Booli
01-01-2016, 10:33 AM
Just a heads up for Android users ( both my phone and tablet ) there is NOT an app for AmpliTube Acoustic in Google Play. There is only the iRig UA on Google play which is completely different.

I got this as a Christmas gift and as I am a complete techno nob ( know zero less 10%) I need some advice. How can I make this work without the app through my Android phone or tablet. I really just wanted to be able to plug into an amp so all my ukes without pick ups could be played amplified through my Fisman loudbox mini. I am not really that concerned about recording, just playing amplified.

On my Nexus 7, running the very latest Android version, I just went into the Google Play app, and searched 'amplitube' (without the quotes) and there were more than 6 different apps with that name, and other apps 'related' to guitar effects/recording.

Maybe you should try and search again?

FYI: IK Multimedia is running a promo for 50% off all apps and most in-app purchases that ends today Jan 1 2016.

Booli
01-01-2016, 11:13 AM
It seems I have a problem, if I record into my iPad there's no way to export or download onto my PC if I want to burn a CD...it seems I have two options, buy a Mac desktop or laptop or buy an android tablet to record into instead of my iPad. Thoughts, suggestions? I'm told the android tablets have some real issues with music recording in terms of signal delay and lag issues.

On most all music apps that I've used on iOS there is a way to export the audio and/or send it via email, FTP, or upload it to your DropBox account.

Not all apps have this feature in the same exact menu function. Many apps have a HELP overlay that explains all the buttons if you press the '?' button in one of the corners. Other than that, many times, the export function will be hidden under a button that looks like a square with an arrow on top, like this:

/\
||

There's also Audio Copy/Paste which lets you bring audio from one program to another.

If you are on an older version of iOS, you will not see all the features. The best way to upgrade your iOS is by plugging in to your computer via USB, and then run iTunes on your computer, and first doing a BACKUP from the iPad to your computer, and THEN tell iTunes to UPGRADE your device. It takes about 45 mins for both the backup and the upgrade and is mostly automatic.

You should also become familiar with 'iTunes File Sharing' as this lets you capture your creations from the iOS device by using iTunes and then save them on the computer. Since iOS 5.0 this function has been used and works quite well.

It's not any more complicated than how you would download photos from your old-school digital camera by plugging it in to your computer via USB.

-

On Android, what I've read about latency is related to doing audio interface connection via USB using an OTG cable. The way that Android uses a Virtual Machine on top of the underlying Linux core prevents USB Audio from being 'realtime' since it is not connecting to the Linux kernel directly but first going through the Android layer, and there is some delay.

Another issue with audio on Android is that this OS is VERY late to the game with drivers for peripherals, as well as Class-Compliant USB for anything other than a Camera or Mass Storage (thumb drive, or SD card), and because of this the API (programmer's reference code) is very young and not nearly as developed as that for iOS (which is based upon Mac OSX that has been in development since 2000) and Mac OSX is based upon FreeBSD Unix which has been around since the late 1970's.

Linux has only been around in useful form since about 1992 (thanks to Finnish programmer Linus Torvalds), and Android did not exist in useful form until about 2006, shortly after which Google bought Android from the original developers (late 2007) after seeing how the original iPhone was selling like hotcakes and wanted to compete with Apple.

So the short version is that doing audio with Android via the headphone port should be near-realtime, i.e., with very little or no latency, and as such the iRig Acoustic and similar devices have been reported to work a bit better than those that use the USB port via an OTG cable on Android.

A few weeks ago I was looking at the Android apps for music recording and guitar effects, and compared to iOS, there isn't even 1/10th the number of apps. In addition to that, all the smaller developers are charging extra for USB Audio drivers, like $10 each, and they are all using a different driver model and not adhering to the reference spec from Google, so reliability is a HUGE problem as is the total cost if you want to use more than one app at different times. This reminds me too much of the bad-old-days of being a Windows user and working in tech support for 30 yrs, i.e., driver conflicts and 'DLL-hell' (which was one of the reasons I switched to Mac in 2005, and last year to Linux for my everyday computer).

Also Android does not have a function for AudioBus or InterAppAudio like iOS does, and this feature allows you to route audio back and forth between all compatible apps on your device, like a virtual patchbay. Right now, nearly all the audio apps I have on iOS that either play, record, or effect sound in some way, can all communicate with each other just like if I had a rack full of gear and a mile of cables to connect them all.

Aside from that, from all the reviews I've read on the Google Play store, the XDA forums, and many app review sites, there are HUGE problems with latency as you've said, and these developers that write these apps are in a pickel due to the fragmentation of Android hardware and that is multiplied into a nasty permutation when in combination with all of the possible audio devices you can plug in to USB.

Better manufacturers use hardware that can work with the native 'Class Compliant' USB drivers that are built-in to Mac, Windows, and Linux operating systems, but Android is running in a Davlik Virtual Machine, which does not have direct access to the hardware, nor are the standard USB drivers implemented the same across the spectrum and variety of all Android hardware devices from over 30 different manufacturers.

This is why I went with a 'Google' Nexus 7 (2013 HD), which is actually manufactured by Asus, but under strict control by Google. Samsung and all the other hardware companies each do things differently, so it's like the wild west and a crap shoot, some Android devices work MUCH better than others when you are looking at hardware peripherals.

For probably 85% of Android users this is not a problem as the #1 use of Android/iOS devices AFTER phone functions is to feed their social media addiction (facebook, twitter, what's app, pinterest, instagram, etc), after that they want a browser and then email, and then all the really cool stuff that inspires the use of hardware is only really cared about by the 'other' 15% that wants to maximize every function of their device, i.e., with Audio, Video and other apps that can use hardware peripherals.

Sorry for the tangent, and if too far off-topic I will take my beatings gracefully, but I felt this info was important and wanted to share what I know...thanks for reading....

Jim Hanks
01-01-2016, 11:29 AM
It seems I have a problem, if I record into my iPad there's no way to export or download onto my PC if I want to burn a CD.

As Booli says, that is almost certainly not true. What hardware and app are you using to record? We can probably help with specifics.

Booli
01-18-2017, 04:25 PM
Anyone still on this thread might be interested in the just-released and newest model iRig, which I posted about with photos and links over here:

http://forum.ukuleleunderground.com/showthread.php?125196-NEW-iRig-Acoustic-Stage-99