PDA

View Full Version : Why are So many Pono ending up in the Marketplace?



ukeeku
11-23-2015, 08:29 AM
I have noticed that a LOT of Pono ukes end up in the marketplace.
What is the deal? Are they bad so people are dumping them?
Did a search in the market place for the last 6 months and took the first 10 pages and got these numbers:
Pono 24
Koaloha 12
Kala 11
Mya Moe 6
Fluke/flea 6
Collings 5
Martin 4
Kamaka 4
Ohana 4
Mainland 2
Kanilea' 2
Oscar Schmidt 2
KPK 1
Mele 1

24 Pono is a lot considering how many they make and the price range.
Also there have been a ton of Mya Moe as well for the number made. I see more of those than any other custom uke.

This is an academic question. what do you think is going on? Are Pono just a upgrade between the cheap Kala and a nice uke?
Do Mya Moe ukes just get sold because they are worth a good amount of money and people will sell them first?
Or is it that are not all that and people dump them since they don't like them that much?

Rtnrlfy
11-23-2015, 08:32 AM
I've been wondering that myself... just coincidence, perhaps? I have just acquired two Ponos recently myself (one from a UU member, one from HMS) and I'm super super happy with them so far. But perhaps a lot of people are either in unfortunate circumstances (I know I saw at least one person selling for that reason) or, as you say, transitioning to an even higher-grade uke.

(If any more Ponos come up for sale, sure wish they'd be sopranos... just sayin'. :iwant: )

Lesley

hawaii 50
11-23-2015, 08:54 AM
I guess for the amount of ukes that Pono has sold the number makes sense they are the bridge between the imports and nicer K brands...and resell for a good price
Collins builds very few ukes so I think 5 is a larger number than the 24 for Pono...these are production ukes

for the customs I guess Mya Moe has so many being sold because they build more ukes than others

each person sells their ukes for reasons they only know....which is fine with me it does not mean ukes are not good

my 2 cents

spookelele
11-23-2015, 08:54 AM
Different people like different things, and maybe bought something and it wasn't quite what they expected/wanted.
Just cuz something gets sold doesn't mean it wasn't good.
There are tons of threads about selling remorse.

Also.. some people have an addiction to NUD's.

ukuleleden
11-23-2015, 09:08 AM
I received my Mainland Slothead mahogany concert Uke today, and I now know why you don't see many being sold! Wow! Better than some $1K and up ukuleles I have played, really!!!

Jim Hanks
11-23-2015, 09:11 AM
I guess for the amount of ukes that Pono has sold the number makes sense they are the bridge between the imports and nicer K brands...and resell for a good price

That was my initial thought as well. Folks step "up" from the Ohanas, Kalas, Lanikais into Pono and then get itching for "more". It's a gateway drug. :p

Freeda
11-23-2015, 09:21 AM
Ponos are highly recommended here. But it isn't a one size fits all thing.

DaveY
11-23-2015, 09:25 AM
From the Department of Anecdotal Evidence and Small Sample Size: I sold mine a year or two ago because I never got comfortable with the thick neck.

mattydee
11-23-2015, 09:26 AM
One data point: I 'traded' up to Pono from a Kala, and sold the Pono when I got a custom.

actadh
11-23-2015, 09:29 AM
That was my initial thought as well. Folks step "up" from the Ohanas, Kalas, Lanikais into Pono and then get itching for "more". It's a gateway drug. :p
I think that goes for the KoAlohas, too. Both Pono and KoAloha get such good reviews on here, so more are bought, then they might be the step up ukuleles that get thinned when upgrading or circumstances change. The Ohanas, Kalas, Lanikais etc. get kept because they are easier to continue in the herd as a practice, or as a travel ukulele, or get given away.

I enjoy my entry level ukuleles, but know they are slated for a giveaway to various grandkids as they get older, not as a sale down the road. But, if circumstances changed for me, and I needed rent money, then my beloved KoAloha would be the first to be offered for sale.

Love the gateway drug reference.

spookelele
11-23-2015, 09:41 AM
So maybe the advice should be to skip the pono and jump directly to the custom?

pritch
11-23-2015, 09:51 AM
It's a gateway drug. :p

Agreed. Somebody in another thread suggested that it's less expensive over all to start with a more expensive instrument if you think you are going to stick with it.
While that makes perfect sense, a lot of us may not have the confidence to do that.

I have two Pono, no plans to sell either. One will be useful for playing outside when the weather is suitably inviting.

we tigers
11-23-2015, 10:09 AM
So maybe the advice should be to skip the pono and jump directly to the custom?

I sold a custom in favor of a Pono. Just sayin'.

JustinJ
11-23-2015, 10:14 AM
I still value the Pono ukes highly. For the price they offer outstanding value. I had to sell mine because I purchased an archtop guitar. I told my wife that I would sell it to help pay for the guitar. It was an excellent uke and has a good home to someone who appreciates it.

I've been surprised at the number of expensive ukes for sale in the marketplace. There seems to be a lot of Mya Moes up for sale over the last six months. I think a lot of the buying revolves around the flavor of the month ukulele. Mya Moes were the uke to have several years ago. For a little while, it was the Kinnard uke. I've not heard too much about these, maybe the price is too much.

It seems not only Pono but many other brands for sell. The Kamaka, Koaloha, and Kaniliea sit unsold. In the past, these would have sold instantly.

I also think many people may not be playing their ukes anymore. They have multiple ukes and may not play them that much anymore. Looking at all the ukes in the corner unplayed and the holidays around the corner inspire people to sell.

What I've found interesting is that many of the ukes are from sellers who were on this forum years ago. They show up to sell their ukes. This leads me to believe that they may not play as often.

Perhaps, there are not as many people picking up the uke anymore. Those players who continue are upgrading one last time. So the K brands and other brands sit unsold.

* My opinion on the upgrade of ukes is that people think they will play better. They buy a new uke and still sound the same. They then sell it later on.

spookelele
11-23-2015, 10:32 AM
I only have 1 pono, and I'll never sell it, because Andrew K makes it special.
Whenever I start to think people suck.. I play it and remember it's not always so.

La Perdrix
11-23-2015, 11:43 AM
the reason why I sold mine : no projection.

spookelele
11-23-2015, 11:43 AM
It would be interesting to compile listed sales vs completed sales.
Just cuz something is listed doesn't mean it gets sold.

BigD
11-23-2015, 11:48 AM
My pono had forever been my dream uke. Not much for some people but ive never had any intention or the need to get anything better because it suited me just fine. I loved the neck and it sounded fantastic. But i eventually came to terms with the fact that i really do prefer a longer scale. Sold it to fund my Blueridge 40TCE and haven't looked back since :D

jjdejd
11-23-2015, 12:24 PM
My first Uke was a Pono w/ low g because I watched what everyone was recommending. It was a Pro Classic tenor w/wound C string from HMS. I tried to get used to it, but eventually asked Aaron what the problem may be, he said it was a higher tension Uke and the low g setup w/ wound C probably made it a little harder to play.I also noticed the thicker neck. I tried a few concerts and sold the Pono and have been a concert fan since. It's just an opinion. I guess you have to decide what's right for you. Just my 2 cents!

DownUpDave
11-23-2015, 12:38 PM
Why so many Ponos get sold...........because they SUCK............crickets ;)

I actually sold a custom and bought a Pono pro classic tenor, cedar and maccassar ebony. It goes head to head with my Collings, Mya Moe, Webber, Compass Rose, LfdM.......you get the idea.

We are all individuals and there is no one size fits or pleases all.:-)Buy em , try em, then decide to keep em or sell em.:-)Rinse and repeat till you find what captures your heart.

spookelele
11-23-2015, 01:59 PM
the reason why I sold mine : no projection.

Might just be wrong strings.
Wound bass either gc, or just c makes alot of difference.

coolkayaker1
11-23-2015, 02:10 PM
So maybe the advice should be to skip the pono and jump directly to the custom?

Or, jump one step further directly to the endgame: buy a guitar.

sam13
11-23-2015, 02:53 PM
I have 3 Pono Pro Classic Tenors, and one Baritone. I love them all ... superb quality, easy to play and also agree that they hold up very well with Dave's Mya Moe, Collings, Compass Rose, my and his LFdM ... I said hold up very well ... didn't say better ... but they are exceptional instruments. I played all 4 in the last two days.

Katysax said it really well in a PM to me ... they are the "working man's cadillac" as they offer exceptional quality but you can take it to a pub and not be so stressed because it can be replaced if something happens to it.

hollisdwyer
11-23-2015, 03:05 PM
I just purchased a Pono Pro Classic concert from the Marketplace for a Xmas gift for my wife. It looks like a very nice instrument to learn on and keep until she might want to step up to a custom (probably get her a Barron River if that's the case).

Re Mya Moe's, I have sold a few here over the past year. Some to buy other Mya Moe's some to afford a custom commission. In fact I wouldn't mind selling my most beautiful Mya Moe Sitka over Koa cut away tenor to buy either the Mya Moe fiddleback tenor or the Eddie Vedder Tenor that are on the Market place right now. For me it's a way of experiencing a wider range of great instruments.

vanflynn
11-23-2015, 03:25 PM
Personally I don't want to screw around with the hassle of selling, shipping, hoping you get paid, hoping the buyer isn't unreasonable ........ of a uke that's worth $150. I would rather gift it to a friend and hope they enjoy it.

Pono, KoAloha's Opio, Mainland, upper level Kala, ( and others) are the introduction for many folks to what a good, playable uke is all about. Some (like me) stall at this level, others move on. Mainland and KoAloha have unique styles that some either love or hate. I bought a Pono from HMS because: A - I love the traditional look and B - I figured that Andrew (being part of the Pono / Ko'olauu family) will treat me good. I was right! I would recommend Pono to anyone and a used one is a great chance to move up into a decent instrument or try a different size.

pluck
11-23-2015, 03:36 PM
Lower end uses are easier to sell on craigslist. Buyers with lower expectations get to try before they buy.

La Perdrix
11-23-2015, 06:30 PM
Might just be wrong strings.
Wound bass either gc, or just c makes alot of difference.

I tried many, aquila, worth clear, brown, savarez alliance, etc.
I know now that wound strings can improve a "mute" or a cheap uke but that wasn't the sound I expected.

natchez
11-23-2015, 09:30 PM
Here is my 2 cents. I recently acquired a Pono MCD, and have a Pono MT arriving shortly, both pre-owned. So for me, as a buyer, it has been simply the value proposition. Price to build and to sound quality ratios are high. I also travel a lot, often for weeks or sometimes months at a time, and did not want instruments that I would "fret over" when traveling to various places where temperature and humidity changes occur regularly. And, Ponos are quite sturdily built compared to some others.

The original question was why there are so many for sale, it seems likely because at their price points Ponos give a lot of bang for the buck and many, many more will have been sold. For example, at HMS there are 43 reviews posted for the Pono MT and 11 for the Pono MC, while I did not see any others with more than about 7 reviews. If the number of reviews at HMS correlates somewhat to the number of ukuleles sold then many more Ponos are out there. Also, they are priced just high enough to be worth the shipping charges to sell nationally rather than just to sell locally.

Seems from the posts above some sell due to some specific feature like projection- I do find my Pono concert on the quiet side, or slightly thicker necks. For my current level of play and for now they fit the bill well. The tenor also has a truss rod- something I think may be prove useful for the future in my dry home Nevada climate and the only marginally slightly more humid Scottsdale climate I visit often.

La Perdrix
11-23-2015, 09:43 PM
to be honest, projection was the only thing I did not like on my Pono concert mahogany ; it was a beautiful and perfectly built instrument, with a warm and rich sound, but too much quiet indeed.

maxmax
11-23-2015, 11:48 PM
I'm in the process of moving right now, so I can't handle one more thing I have to do, but once I've settled in, I'm also going to be listing my Pono MTDX for sale.

It was my first uke and I bought it sight unseen because of the high praise Ponos get here. I thought I wanted a tenor, but realised I like Sopranos and Concerts better. It's also kinda quiet and doesn't have a very wide dynamic range, kinda dead sounding. I simply don't like it very much. It plays nice though, and I see many people complaining about the deep neck, but that's actually the thing I like about it the most. I don't like shallow necks and unfortunately, it seems that most ukuleles have shallower necks than the Ponos.

spookelele
11-24-2015, 01:10 AM
I tried many, aquila, worth clear, brown, savarez alliance, etc.
I know now that wound strings can improve a "mute" or a cheap uke but that wasn't the sound I expected.

Yeah.. to be honest I was disappointed in my pono at first. I also tried many strings.
I set it up high g originally, and threw alot of different strings at it, and most sounded meh.
Then I tried it low g, and that was a little better.

And then I tried wound low g, which was something I was resisting like the plague cuz I hate the squeek and zip.
But that was quite a bit better, and then I tried wound g and c, and that was even more better.

My next string change will be to the new south coast ml-wb linear set, but that might be a bit, as my current set still has alot of life left.

JustinJ
11-24-2015, 03:54 AM
Or, jump one step further directly to the endgame: buy a guitar.
I'm at this point in my purchases of ukuleles. I have one nice one and do not plan on upgrading.

I have two guitars and it seems you get better value for your money with guitars. You can have a really nice classical guitar around the 900- 1500.00 range. I bought an Ibanez Hollowbody guitar for the price of a midrange ukulele and it sounds great.

I still love playing my uke but will not upgrade it. The amount of money that a higher end uke costs is hard to justify for me now.

I find that learning the ukulele and guitar makes a nice synergy. If you learn the notes on the uke, then when you take up guitar, you only have to learn the first four frets. You get to the fifth fret and the first four strings are tuned GCEA just like a uke. Most of the movable chords on the uke transfer nicely to the guitar.

Also the ukulele has a nice percussiveness that the guitar does not have. The guitar allows more complex chord sounds and of course the bass. I enjoy the voice of the tenor uke and it's hard to beat for its singing voice.

*I would encourage people to play the ukes they own. It'll bring you much more happiness than selling and buying in UAS.

RichM
11-24-2015, 03:58 AM
*I would encourage people to play the ukes they own. It'll bring you much more happiness than selling and buying in UAS.

I would encourage people to do whatever they want, and find happiness in whatever they do. Happy holidays, everyone.

tbeltrans
11-24-2015, 04:09 AM
A couple of quick thoughts on the OP's question:

1. If a person buys sight unseen, then the reality of the instrument may be different for that person than what is read on the net as experienced by others. The solution is, where possible, try before you buy.
2. Moving up to a higher end instrument. My experience with guitars over the years in hindsight is that it is often less expensive to buy "right" the first time, rather than churning through various instruments at lower price levels to eventually get there. Of course, to do so, one must know what s/he wants in the first place and experimentation (i.e. the "churn") may be the only way to find out.

In the end, there is no one "right" solution that fits every person and situation, so we can each only speak to our own experiences. If there are more Pono ukuleles sold than the other brands, we can certainly expect more Ponos to show up on the used market unless there is something so special about them that people simply want to hang onto them. Never having played or owned a Pono, I can't make that judgement.

For my own experience, my very first ukulele was a Riptide. After playing it for a week or so, I realized that it was not for me and that I really would need to go higher end right away. I traded it off for a much better (high end) ukulele. I wanted one each of soprano, concert, and tenor. I decided to skip the churn and go all the way straight off, and have been much happier in the long run. For me, all koa wood seems more "ukulele" than those that look like miniature guitars with spruce tops and rosewood back and sides, though I am sure those are very nice too. So my focus was quite narrow, making the choices easy. I did not want to buy sight unseen, so I stuck with what I could get locally. Fortunately, we have one shop in my area that sells high end ukuleles, so it really was not difficult to get it done. I have never looked back since completing my three ukulele collection.

Tony

JustinJ
11-24-2015, 04:16 AM
I would encourage people to do whatever they want, and find happiness in whatever they do. Happy holidays, everyone.

Interesting article on happiness and buying. I was aware of the term habituation. It's why many find themselves in UAS. I found this article interesting for the idea of happiness in experiences. What I meant by playing the uke you have is the joy that comes from accomplishing a new song or getting a technique down. It's something that money can not buy.

http://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2013/06/why-wanting-expensive-things-makes-us-so-much-happier-than-buying-them/276717/

strumsilly
11-24-2015, 04:22 AM
Pono, KoAloha, Mainland, upper level Kala, ( and others) are the introduction for many folks to what a good, playable uke is all about. hmm, I don't know about lumping Koaloha with these others, unless you are talking about their import line. I have had various models of the others you mentioned, and none of them were even close to my Koaloha tenor. then, it also costs 2x as much. I have not tried one of the Pono PC series though, which are about the same price. In my experience, you can buy a more expensive instrument with more bling and better fit and finish, but I have played and owned A LOT of instruments and still have not found one I like better.

vanflynn
11-24-2015, 05:16 AM
hmm, I don't know about lumping Koaloha with these others, unless you are talking about their import line.

Yes, I meant the Opio. Sorry.

etzeppy
11-24-2015, 05:26 AM
Don't know. The wife just got a Pono Pro Classic 5 tenor spruce/rosewood. She loves everything about it. Before buying she was told two things....the neck is huge and the stock strings suck (dull & lack projection). Both were false in this instance. She has tiny hands and had no problem at all converting from a Kala neck. With the Pono radius fret board, she thinks it's easier to play than Kala. The stock Ko'olau 'Alohi Strings (low G) are lively and resonate. No complaints there either. The build quality and finish are excellent.

spookelele
11-24-2015, 05:28 AM
Don't know. The wife just got a Pono Pro Classic 5 tenor spruce/rosewood.

That could be part of it.
Spruce and cedar are generally speaking.. louder than acacia and mahogany. I dunno about mango...

tbeltrans
11-24-2015, 06:07 AM
One problem that can happen, and I know does with guitars anyway, is that the better a player you become, and the wider variety of instruments you play, the more you come to appreciate quality. There is something to be said for true craftsmanship, whether we are talking about furniture, musical instruments, cars, etc. Personally, I don't need a "high end" car and would not spend the money on it. I have always bought what I could afford in a car (never new), and have therefore never had a car loan. My current car is a 2000 Toyota Echo that I bought in 2004.

Also, I could not care less about going to a fine restaurant. To me, there is little point because once the meal is over, it is gone and will pass through me and be gone forever in a day or two, though I know several people who live for a trip to a fine restaurant and really enjoy doing that. I tend to put more value on something that will last me a long time and provide enjoyment again and again during that time. There are many things that can do that, such as a decent set of golf clubs, or a home theater system, or a big house in the suburbs, or model railroading, or fine cameras, whatever else is available.

However, for me, I appreciate fine craftsmanship in musical instruments, along with being able to learn and play them well. I have two wood acoustic guitars, a 1997 Taylor 912c and a Santa Cruz Guitar Company (SCGC) Firefly. Both are fine instruments, however I can readily sense the difference in quality between the two, with the finer workmanship and sound going to the SCGC. I could also readily sense the difference between the Riptide ukulele (a relatively nice instrument, definitely not "junk") and what I replaced it with (traded it in on a Kamaka Ohta-San concert). To me, those differences were important, but may not be to somebody else (just as is the case for me with cars).

In a car, all I need is a dependable means of getting from point A to point B and back as inexpensively as possible. In an instrument, I really do appreciate the workmanship, appearance, and sound that a high end ukulele or guitar brings every time I pick it up to play.

Different things are important to different people. We all have different priorities and ways of applying these to our buying habits.

For some people, playing a ukulele is not enough, and collecting or churning through instruments may well be. For other people, playing and learning new things about the ukulele is of primary importance and as long as their ukulele sounds reasonably good and handles well enough, it will serve them for a long time.

So in a thread such as this, we all have to realize that we are different in how we approach the ukulele and there is no one approach more valid than another. One person may say "just enjoy what you have", while another revels in posting NUD with fun pictures, while yet another enjoys putting up Youtube videos of new tunes s/he has learned. None of these is a "better" way, since in each case, the person is doing what he or she wants to do and is getting enjoyment for having done it.

Tony

katysax
11-24-2015, 06:19 AM
The number of Ponos for sale probably reflects the number of Ponos sold to begin with. There are simply more of them in the market. I've sold Ponos because they are replaceable. If I want to thin the herd I think twice about selling a rarer uke. There really is a wide range of Ponos. The best ones can be better than an average Ko'olau. The worst ones are no better than a cheap Lanikai. I am a big fan of the tenor Pro Classic line, but the others in my experience are hit and miss.

Similarly Mya Moe, there are lots of them compared to a lot of customs. Despite the waiting list its easy to get another one. They sell for enough money to make the sale worthwhile.

For me buying a ukulele is less buying a "thing" and more buying an experience. If I sell it I may feel that I enjoyed the experience but its not the experience I am looking for at that moment.

janeray1940
11-24-2015, 06:28 AM
One problem that can happen, and I know does with guitars anyway, is that the better a player you become, and the wider variety of instruments you play, the more you come to appreciate quality. There is something to be said for true craftsmanship, whether we are talking about furniture, musical instruments, cars, etc. Personally, I don't need a "high end" car and would not spend the money on it. I have always bought what I could afford in a car (never new), and have therefore never had a car loan. My current car is a 2000 Toyota Echo that I bought in 2004.

Also, I could not care less about going to a fine restaurant. To me, there is little point because once the meal is over, it is gone and will pass through me and be gone forever in a day or two, though I know several people who live for a trip to a fine restaurant and really enjoy doing that. I tend to put more value on something that will last me a long time and provide enjoyment again and again during that time. There are many things that can do that, such as a decent set of golf clubs, or a home theater system, or a big house in the suburbs, or model railroading, or fine cameras, whatever else is available.

However, for me, I appreciate fine craftsmanship in musical instruments, along with being able to learn and play them well. I have two wood acoustic guitars, a 1997 Taylor 912c and a Santa Cruz Guitar Company (SCGC) Firefly. Both are fine instruments, however I can readily sense the difference in quality between the two, with the finer workmanship and sound going to the SCGC. I could also readily sense the difference between the Riptide ukulele (a relatively nice instrument, definitely not "junk") and what I replaced it with (traded it in on a Kamaka Ohta-San concert). To me, those differences were important, but may not be to somebody else (just as is the case for me with cars).

In a car, all I need is a dependable means of getting from point A to point B and back as inexpensively as possible. In an instrument, I really do appreciate the workmanship, appearance, and sound that a high end ukulele or guitar brings every time I pick it up to play.

Different things are important to different people. We all have different priorities and ways of applying these to our buying habits.

For some people, playing a ukulele is not enough, and collecting or churning through instruments may well be. For other people, playing and learning new things about the ukulele is of primary importance and as long as their ukulele sounds reasonably good and handles well enough, it will serve them for a long time.

So in a thread such as this, we all have to realize that we are different in how we approach the ukulele and there is no one approach more valid than another. One person may say "just enjoy what you have", while another revels in posting NUD with fun pictures, while yet another enjoys putting up Youtube videos of new tunes s/he has learned. None of these is a "better" way, since in each case, the person is doing what he or she wants to do and is getting enjoyment for having done it.

Tony

Once again, Tony, it seems as if we have similar philosophies. 1999 Toyota Corolla here, bought used in 2001. I've never bought a brand-new car either, and I feel the same about high-end restaurants. :)

Instruments, though - my first non-childhood uke was a $100 Ohana. While there was nothing inherently wrong with it, I knew within three weeks of playing it that I wanted something of higher quality. I already knew that I liked the Kamaka sound and plain-jane look, but balked at the price tag. Instead, a Koaloha Pikake soprano came my way for a bargain-basement price, so I went for that. Again, within a few weeks I was feeling dissatisfied (mostly due to the limitations of only having 12 frets). Shortly thereafter a Kamaka HF-2 concert came up locally on Craigslist, again for a bargain-basement price. I met the seller, offered him $100 over his asking price because I felt that he was cheating himself (he needed money to pay the rent, supposedly - been there myself many times!), and that uke has been a daily player ever since. That was 6 years ago.

My experience isn't with Pono, which I've never played or even seen in the wild, but more with mid-price ukes in general, and based on that - I wouldn't say skip the Pono/midrange and go straight for a custom, but I *might* say "skip the Pono/midrange and go straight for a K-brand" - assuming that's the sound one wants.

Also worth noting: I've had one custom in my uke journey. Past tense - note that I don't have it any longer.

Fleacia
11-24-2015, 07:00 AM
From the Department of Anecdotal Evidence and Small Sample Size: I sold mine a year or two ago because I never got comfortable with the thick neck.

Me too. Also, mine was a tenor, and though I thought I'd like the deeper body, it didn't work for me. It seemed like a good idea on paper, but when I couldn't actually live with the instrument, I passed it on for another one. Not a Pono, because something else was more comfortable to play--a cedar/rosewood concert, same wood combo as the Pono, shallower body, and thinner neck profile. This one happens to be a Mainland. BTW I prefer closed geared tuners, but they were a bonus on the Mainland and not why I chose the uke. Love it!

Ukejenny
11-24-2015, 07:11 AM
I see all the Ponos in the marketplace as an opportunity for those of you who like to shop, buy, sell, try... lots of ukuleles. It is a great time to get a great deal on what might be a great ukulele for you, if you are wanting to try a Pono, or add another Pono to your ukulele family.

When I very first found UU and got into ukulele playing, Pono was the first brand that I really started looking into, really listening to on YouTube, and really researched when trying to figure out what kind of instrument to buy. I ended up with another brand, for financial reasons, but loved all that time with the Ponos online.

wayfarer75
11-24-2015, 07:13 AM
I have a cheap soprano (Kala), a mid-range semi-Hawaiian concert (Kelii) and two higher-end ukes, a Kamaka pineapple and a spec Barron River mahogany concert. These are all the ukes I bought (except for a LoPrinzi soprano that needed to be returned due to a twisted neck), I haven't sold any of them, and I don't want to. They are all really different ukes, and they all have individual voices.

Am I weird? I am if you look at this board. The closest I have come to trying out a uke before buying was playing a Kamaka HF-1 at Willcutt Guitars in Lexington, KY--before I laid down the money for the pineapple. I saw pics of ukes #2-4 before buying, but only heard samples of one (the BR). This doesn't account for the feel of the ukes and their overall playability. My Kelii has a thick neck, the Barron River has a super slim one and the sopranos are in the middle. I may be less picky than others about that stuff. My Kelii is similarly mid-range in price to a Pono deluxe, and it is fantastic. To those who want the longest sustain and the loudest volume, it is the winner of all my ukes. It's strung low G and plays sweet slow ballads; it sounds like a tenor. Somebody else might prefer a different sound.

I figure people buy a Pono because they are so highly regarded here--HMS has a gazillion videos of them sounding fantastic--but then people get one and realize that they really aren't Corey Fujimoto after all. Maybe the uke is a lemon, a dud. Or maybe they don't like the Ko'olau strings (I don't) and don't bother changing, or they would rather play a uke with a more classic sound like sopranos and some concerts have, or they're like me and have tiny hands and can't do tenor stretches, or they just need money and know the Pono will sell. I bet way more Ponos are never sold and are happily owned. But I don't doubt that there are many more reasons for selling a Pono than I could think of.

ukeeku
11-24-2015, 07:55 AM
The number of Ponos for sale probably reflects the number of Ponos sold to begin with. There are simply more of them in the market. I've sold Ponos because they are replaceable. If I want to thin the herd I think twice about selling a rarer uke. There really is a wide range of Ponos. The best ones can be better than an average Ko'olau. The worst ones are no better than a cheap Lanikai. I am a big fan of the tenor Pro Classic line, but the others in my experience are hit and miss.

Similarly Mya Moe, there are lots of them compared to a lot of customs. Despite the waiting list its easy to get another one. They sell for enough money to make the sale worthwhile.

For me buying a ukulele is less buying a "thing" and more buying an experience. If I sell it I may feel that I enjoyed the experience but its not the experience I am looking for at that moment.

Thing is, Kala, Lanikai, Oscar Schmidt, and Ohana are the big sellers. they sell way more than Pono since they are in many of the distributor chains, but yet we see very few in comparison for sale.
I wish I had sales numbers for each. it would be an interesting thing to compare apples to apples. a so many resold per 100 sold as new in a year.

Keep in mind I am not saying Pono ukes are bad. just an observation.

wayfarer75
11-24-2015, 08:05 AM
Thing is, Kala, Lanikai, Oscar Schmidt, and Ohana are the big sellers. they sell way more than Pono since they are in many of the distributor chains, but yet we see very few in comparison for sale.
I wish I had sales numbers for each. it would be an interesting thing to compare apples to apples. a so many resold per 100 sold as new in a year.

Keep in mind I am not saying Pono ukes are bad. just an observation.

True about the sale numbers, but Ponos have a better reputation than the Kalas/Lanikais/Oscar Schmidts/Ohanas, and their prices start higher because they don't do laminates. The top end Pono is about twice the price of a top end Kala (not the Elites made in CA). If I were selling a uke and had one of those brands and a Pono, I would probably sell whichever one would get me the most money. I wouldn't bother selling my Kala KA-S; I'd give it away. If I had to sell a uke because I needed the money, I'd probably sell my Barron River. I have had it the least amount of time=bonded with it the least. It's my most expensive instrument=more money for whatever I needed. That might be the case for some. In your research, did you note why the seller was making the sale? Some say why, and some don't. I have seen some very shocking sales on the Marketplace here. Perhaps I'm too attached to my instruments, but I can't imagine selling them unless I really really really needed the money.

JustinJ
11-24-2015, 09:46 AM
I would like to add that Rappsy sells a lot of Ponos on here. He seems to come across a lot of them. He may have 3-4 on sell at a time. This may account for some of the higher numbers.

ukeeku
11-24-2015, 10:16 AM
I would like to add that Rappsy sells a lot of Ponos on here. He seems to come across a lot of them. He may have 3-4 on sell at a time. This may account for some of the higher numbers.

that's a whole other issue. it seems that they may be breaking a rule in the market place

"Member-to-member private sales which form no part of a business"

Doc_J
11-24-2015, 12:31 PM
that's a whole other issue. it seems that they may be breaking a rule in the market place

"Member-to-member private sales which form no part of a business"
No rule broken there. My friend Lenny has just tried a lot of ukes, and many Ponos.

I've gone through quite a few ukes myself. I enjoyed playing every one. But I like trying new ones, and only keep so many. Thus, a lot of great ukes have gone to other players to enjoy. Must be a lot of people do this too. That's why we see so many nice ukes in the marketplace. I agree with what has been said here earlier. The number of a particular brand uke being sold is probably reflective of their production volumes.

SoloRule
11-24-2015, 03:00 PM
Don't know. The wife just got a Pono Pro Classic 5 tenor spruce/rosewood. She loves everything about it. Before buying she was told two things....the neck is huge and the stock strings suck (dull & lack projection). Both were false in this instance. She has tiny hands and had no problem at all converting from a Kala neck. With the Pono radius fret board, she thinks it's easier to play than Kala. The stock Ko'olau 'Alohi Strings (low G) are lively and resonate. No complaints there either. The build quality and finish are excellent.

So happy to hear that the uke arrived and she likes it.
I have small hand yet the Pono neck does not bother me at all. My other uke has thin neck and it hurt my wrist.
Pono is indeed the entrance to a future custom uke.
My only complaint is the weight !

hawaii 50
11-24-2015, 04:33 PM
Thing is, Kala, Lanikai, Oscar Schmidt, and Ohana are the big sellers. they sell way more than Pono since they are in many of the distributor chains, but yet we see very few in comparison for sale.
I wish I had sales numbers for each. it would be an interesting thing to compare apples to apples. a so many resold per 100 sold as new in a year.

Keep in mind I am not saying Pono ukes are bad. just an observation.

not sure I would go through the trouble of selling a cheaper laminate uke..I would gift to someone who needed a uke....how much would you sell a $120.00 uke for anyway..you still have to pay shipping to the person who buys it....:)

I still think the Collins ukes that are being resold for what ever reason is a question too? they build very few but your research shows that they are being sold used also..this much more of a comparison to a high end Pono than a low end Lanikai....IMO

sukie
11-24-2015, 04:37 PM
I received my Mainland Slothead mahogany concert Uke today, and I now know why you don't see many being sold! Wow! Better than some $1K and up ukuleles I have played, really!!!

I know. They are really nice.

uketanzon
11-24-2015, 04:54 PM
I have noticed that a LOT of Pono ukes end up in the marketplace.
What is the deal? Are they bad so people are dumping them?
Did a search in the market place for the last 6 months and took the first 10 pages and got these numbers:
Pono 24
Koaloha 12
Kala 11
Mya Moe 6
Fluke/flea 6
Collings 5
Martin 4
Kamaka 4
Ohana 4
Mainland 2
Kanilea' 2
Oscar Schmidt 2
KPK 1
Mele 1

24 Pono is a lot considering how many they make and the price range.
Also there have been a ton of Mya Moe as well for the number made. I see more of those than any other custom uke.

This is an academic question. what do you think is going on? Are Pono just a upgrade between the cheap Kala and a nice uke?
Do Mya Moe ukes just get sold because they are worth a good amount of money and people will sell them first?
Or is it that are not all that and people dump them since they don't like them that much?


I do not see any Loprinzi ukes listed. Not surprised. i own one, it's my favorite.

tbeltrans
11-24-2015, 05:47 PM
Once again, Tony, it seems as if we have similar philosophies. 1999 Toyota Corolla here, bought used in 2001. I've never bought a brand-new car either, and I feel the same about high-end restaurants. :)

Instruments, though - my first non-childhood uke was a $100 Ohana. While there was nothing inherently wrong with it, I knew within three weeks of playing it that I wanted something of higher quality. I already knew that I liked the Kamaka sound and plain-jane look, but balked at the price tag. Instead, a Koaloha Pikake soprano came my way for a bargain-basement price, so I went for that. Again, within a few weeks I was feeling dissatisfied (mostly due to the limitations of only having 12 frets). Shortly thereafter a Kamaka HF-2 concert came up locally on Craigslist, again for a bargain-basement price. I met the seller, offered him $100 over his asking price because I felt that he was cheating himself (he needed money to pay the rent, supposedly - been there myself many times!), and that uke has been a daily player ever since. That was 6 years ago.

My experience isn't with Pono, which I've never played or even seen in the wild, but more with mid-price ukes in general, and based on that - I wouldn't say skip the Pono/midrange and go straight for a custom, but I *might* say "skip the Pono/midrange and go straight for a K-brand" - assuming that's the sound one wants.

Also worth noting: I've had one custom in my uke journey. Past tense - note that I don't have it any longer.

We do seem to have similar philosophies, and in several threads we have now seen that. :)

One thing about used Toyotas is that they do seem to be a safe purchase. I have put over 100,000 miles on mine since I bought it and have had no trouble, though I do have regular maintenance done as I would any car I might own.

With regard to ukuleles, it sounds as if you found what works for you. One of my ukuleles is a custom Koalau that would have been very expensive had I not traded a guitar straight across that I would otherwise have had to sell. The HF-2 is a nice ukulele, so it sounds as if you did the honest thing in your situation and got a great ukulele in return. My favorite of the Kamakas I have tried is the Ohta-San, and fortunately it is the one Kamaka I have. It took a while to find a suitable soprano, but I finally did with my old Martin 2K. It seems easier to me to find really good sounding concert and tenor ukuleles than sopranos. I am sure that is personal taste and that others can readily find a soprano that works for them.

Tony

ukeeku
11-25-2015, 01:44 AM
No rule broken there. My friend Lenny has just tried a lot of ukes, and many Ponos.

I've gone through quite a few ukes myself. I enjoyed playing every one. But I like trying new ones, and only keep so many. Thus, a lot of great ukes have gone to other players to enjoy. Must be a lot of people do this too. That's why we see so many nice ukes in the marketplace. I agree with what has been said here earlier. The number of a particular brand uke being sold is probably reflective of their production volumes.

131 posts in the marketplace in a year and a half is not a business? many people have not sold 10 ukes in the whole time they have been on UU, he is selling 10 a month.

Rakelele
11-25-2015, 03:08 AM
As for the original question, I can think of three possible reasons:

1) Pono Ukes are perceived as mid-range, so they'll get sold when people upgrade.

2) Pono Ukes retain a lot of their value, so they're worth reselling, whereas you might not want to go through the trouble of selling/shipping an inexpensive laminate Uke.

3) Seems like they aren't to everyone's taste; some complain about fat necks, heavy weight, or lack of volume. None of this is true for me, though. I have been pleased with every single one I've owned (six or seven), and much more so than with the K brands. The ones I have all produce plenty of volume, neck profile in the Tenor size is strikingly similar to other makers (I measured), and the same goes for weight, with most differences being due to the species of wood: My Pono Ebony Tenor is a lot heavier than my Pono Acacia Tenor, whereas that latter is similar to my KoAloha Opio and my Kanilea Tenor. Sure, they aren't exactly lightweight, but they feel sturdily built. They have a very nice finish and many features that you'll only find in the custom range. I wouldn't hesitate to buy another one in a heartbeat.

spookelele
11-25-2015, 04:22 AM
Maybe it's a conspiracy led by shipping industry.. cuz they make out like bandits on these.

natchez
11-25-2015, 04:40 AM
As for the original question, I can think of three possible reasons:

1) Pono Ukes are perceived as mid-range, so they'll get sold when people upgrade.

2) Pono Ukes retain a lot of their value, so they're worth reselling, whereas you might not want to go through the trouble of selling/shipping an inexpensive laminate Uke.

3) Seems like they aren't to everyone's taste; some complain about fat necks, heavy weight, or lack of volume. None of this is true for me, though. I have been pleased with every single one I've owned (six or seven), and much more so than with the K brands. The ones I have all produce plenty of volume, neck profile in the Tenor size is strikingly similar to other makers (I measured), and the same goes for weight, with most differences being due to the species of wood: My Pono Ebony Tenor is a lot heavier than my Pono Acacia Tenor, whereas that latter is similar to my KoAloha Opio and my Kanilea Tenor. Sure, they aren't exactly lightweight, but they feel sturdily built. They have a very nice finish and many features that you'll only find in the custom range. I wouldn't hesitate to buy another one in a heartbeat.

I played a friend's Pono MT tenor that was made some time ago, marked made in China and finished in Hawaii, and the neck was indeed quite thick. My just received Pono MT has a neck comparable to other brands and it was made much more recently in Indonesia. So, the same model has differing neck profiles depending upon when and potentially where made. This may account for some of what is heard about Pono necks.

wayfarer75
11-25-2015, 04:48 AM
131 posts in the marketplace in a year and a half is not a business? many people have not sold 10 ukes in the whole time they have been on UU, he is selling 10 a month.

That would be a very poor business model at the prices he's asking.

spookelele
11-25-2015, 06:23 AM
Sure sounds like a business to me. Doesnt seem fair to the other Dealers who are regulars . They should also be allowed to sell 10 a month through the site.:rulez: :confused:

Well.. one indicator.. has he sold 10 of the same one?
If it's an individual selling ones they didn't like, its unlikely that they would be selling a bunch of the same model.
But if it's a store, or someone that has a line on seconds/returns or something.. you'd see a bunch of duplicate listings.

sam13
11-25-2015, 06:46 AM
People try and use all kinds of Ukes ... I wouldn't look into it too much. Rappsy does not own a Uke store nor is a dealer.

He is a great guy, and I consider a friend. Dave's and my enthusiasm for Pono Ukes bit him HARD and he has the means to explore different Ukes and tonal qualities.

His journey has led him to find he likes other makes and sizes scales.

While they are mid priced, one could buy 5-10 of them and it would still be less expensive than some of other high priced customs being sold currently.

rappsy
11-25-2015, 07:41 AM
I would like to add that Rappsy sells a lot of Ponos on here. He seems to come across a lot of them. He may have 3-4 on sell at a time. This may account for some of the higher numbers.


131 posts in the marketplace in a year and a half is not a business? many people have not sold 10 ukes in the whole time they have been on UU, he is selling 10 a month.


That would be a very poor business model at the prices he's asking.


Sure sounds like a business to me. Doesnt seem fair to the other Dealers who are regulars . They should also be allowed to sell 10 a month through the site.:rulez: :confused:


No rule broken there. My friend Lenny has just tried a lot of ukes, and many Ponos.

I've gone through quite a few ukes myself. I enjoyed playing every one. But I like trying new ones, and only keep so many. Thus, a lot of great ukes have gone to other players to enjoy. Must be a lot of people do this too. That's why we see so many nice ukes in the marketplace. I agree with what has been said here earlier. The number of a particular brand uke being sold is probably reflective of their production volumes.

First of all, thanks so much to Hodge and Laura for their comments.

I find it amazing that someone has nothing better to do than to COUNT MY POSTS. The second thing I find amazing is the assumption that every post is for a separate Uke. Many of these posts are bumps, and unless you have hijacked my PM's, there is ABSOLUTELY NO WAY you can know how many I have sold. 10 A MONTH???. This is ludicrous. Put your efforts on something other than criticizing.

Thank you Laura. You are absolutely right. it would not be a good business model with what I am selling it for if this was a business. .:agree: Thank you for that.

Thanks also to Hodge for knowing and communicating that I go through a lot of Ukes in hopes of finding the ones I like. Those who take the time to know me, know that I really like LN concerts, and have a KoAhola, Kanile'a, Kamaka, and an Ono to show for it. If I hadn't bought and sold so many, I would never have gotten to understand this and know where I wanted to be. I have worked hard all my life to be in a situation where I can do this. It doesn't need to be criticized.

I also make a lot of trades, in that I feel that some are easier to trade and sell. For instance, I have gotten a Clara for one of my other earlier deals. I was hoping to like the Clara (I did, but it's concert length), and knew that it would be easier to sell or trade than the one I traded away.

I have many people that have been happy with our trades and sales and have both gotten to experience Ukes that we wouldn't normally be able to.

Before accusing, KNOW THE FACTS.

Back to our regularly schedule programming...

hawaii 50
11-25-2015, 07:47 AM
rappsy......
yeah...selling ten a month thing is kind of crazy...just made up I guess.....not sure why someone would do this...:)

but to keep it real are you a dealer or just someone who loves ukes....:)

spookelele
11-25-2015, 08:46 AM
I dunno, maybe it's just me.
But.. Rappsy selling used ukes here.. doesn't really bother me.
Obviously it bothers ukeeku...

I guess if Rappsy had a bad reputation from selling a bunch of bum ukes or something.. that might be different.
But it seems like people are happy buying or trading stuff with him.

I guess I feel like.. no harm no foul.

wayfarer75
11-25-2015, 08:51 AM
Fact is you have 12 Pono for sale in the past 7 months
http://forum.ukuleleunderground.com/search.php?searchid=7629012

some are the same model over and over, are they the same Uke? Are you reposting the same listing over and over?

Also a business does not need to pay your bills, it just needs to pay for itself. I make a few bucks here and there with the stickers, by no means will I quit my day job, but it pays for me to go to uke events.

Please understand about fairness of the forums. Many dealers would love to sell stuff here.

I don't buy the excuse of looking for the right uke. at this point you would have lost a lot of money if you were buying all these ukes new and selling them as used. travel and play ukes at fests and shops if you are so picky. I suspect that you are buying low selling high. Perception is everything.

If your hobby is buying and selling ukes, start a store

A business needs to make a profit. Rappsy would have to be buying wholesale to be making much of a profit, especially to cover shipping. Where do you think he's buying them from? If it's a series of private transactions, he'd be only making a few bucks, and frankly I'm not enough of a rules Nazi to care. If you have an issue with this, why not ping a mod and let them look into it?

sam13
11-25-2015, 08:56 AM
I dunno, maybe it's just me.
But.. Rappsy selling used ukes here.. doesn't really bother me.
Obviously it bothers ukeeku...

I guess if Rappsy had a bad reputation from selling a bunch of bum ukes or something.. that might be different.
But it seems like people are happy buying or trading stuff with him.

I guess I feel like.. no harm no foul.

I agree. Who cares????!!!

Hey by the way, Happy Thanksgiving to all of my United States friends ... love and appreciate all of you!

soupking
11-25-2015, 09:00 AM
rappsy......
yeah...selling ten a month thing is kind of crazy...just made up I guess.....not sure why someone would do this...:)

but to keep it real are you a dealer or just someone who loves ukes....:)

I surprise Len don't already know if Rappsy a dealer or not, since he know everything :)

WOW.... really, though- not sure how any of this on topic. This place really makes one wonder sometimes lol. I've sold an insane amount of stuff here, but I'm no dealer, nor do I care about what anyone else does with their wares. As to the Pono question, there have been more than enough reasonable explanations already offered. Everyone should really leave this guy alone, though, and go play their ukes instead. Welp, Happy Thanksgiving everyone, since we're all in the spirit today! :cool:

buddhuu
11-25-2015, 09:26 AM
I'm temporarily closing this for review. Back soon.

Thanks.

buddhuu
11-25-2015, 09:52 AM
...And we're back in the room.

Ok. It has been pointed out that Rappsy is selling a lot of ukes in the Marketplace. A few people have noticed and we did get a report about it. When I received the report I looked at Rappsy's Marketplace posts and, yes, there are a lot of them. That said, I saw no real evidence that Rappsy is a dealer or I would have taken action. So, I am taking Rappsy at his word that he is not a dealer unless someone has clear information or evidence to the contrary. I find that substantial evidence is a good thing to have if you're going to start throwing accusations around.

So, our position is that Rappsy is not a dealer unless and until someone provides the mod team with convincing evidence to the contrary. Furthermore, I am now ruling this aspect of the discussion off-topic. If anyone thinks they have light to shed then contact the mod team, otherwise move on.

Thanks.

EDIT: I will be monitoring the Marketplace in an ongoing attempt to make sure all is above board.

Rllink
11-25-2015, 11:22 AM
Where is he who shall remain nameless, and who's name shall never again be uttered upon this site, when you need him?:D

rappsy
11-25-2015, 11:44 AM
Hopefully this is now over.

Thanks for all the support publicly, through PM's and email. How I got dragged into a thread that I did not comment on is beyond me.

good_uke_boy
11-25-2015, 11:57 AM
Where is he who shall remain nameless, and who's name shall never again be uttered upon this site, when you need him?:D

Voldemort?

mm stan
11-25-2015, 12:06 PM
Peanuts, Popcorn, Pono's... get them while they are hot... :)

rappsy
11-25-2015, 12:13 PM
Peanuts, Popcorn, Pono's... get them while they are hot... :)

Excellent. :agree:

rappsy
11-25-2015, 03:14 PM
Jon. Free up some PM space.



Rick, thanks for your action here, mate.

mm stan
11-25-2015, 03:18 PM
Aloha UU Gang,
May all of you enjoy the peaceful thanksgiving holiday and share the warm thoughts in your hearts.. :)

sam13
11-25-2015, 03:26 PM
Aloha UU Gang,
May all of you enjoy the peaceful thanksgiving holiday and share the warm thoughts in your hearts.. :)

And you, brother Stan.

hawaii 50
11-25-2015, 05:53 PM
Aloha UU Gang,
May all of you enjoy the peaceful thanksgiving holiday and share the warm thoughts in your hearts.. :)


I hope people don't take this the wrong way...Happy Thanksgiving to you to Stan....:)
hope to see you soon....

mm stan
11-25-2015, 11:23 PM
Since i see this thread was about Pono, which means righteousness, I thought my manao was appropriate for
Our Thanksgiving day :)

Jerwin
11-25-2015, 11:52 PM
Just to add my 2 cents:

I love my Pono MTDX, it feels and plays great. Once I was thinking about selling just because it's quite a lot of money for me and I mostly spend time on soprano uke or a guitar.

I'll definately give it more play before it goes to some1 else. Great intrument.


Interesting pono neck fact: +-Same thickness as Kala Acacia concert at 2nd fret but Pono has constant neck thickness. So Kala is actually thicker. Also Ohana's tenor neck was similar in terms of thickness (TK-25CE uke). I find my Pono's neck very comfortable. There was 1 fret with sharp edge that was catching my fingernail of strumming hand. Which was realy easy fix.

ukuleleden
11-26-2015, 01:21 AM
Or, jump one step further directly to the endgame: buy a guitar.

I actually found it more rewarding doing just the opposite, getting rid of my guitars for more ukuleles! :cool:

Rllink
11-26-2015, 04:23 AM
I actually found it more rewarding doing just the opposite, getting rid of my guitars for more ukuleles! :cool:I was thinking about playing guitar when I discovered the ukulele. I feel like the uke saved me.

katysax
11-26-2015, 05:41 AM
Thing is, Kala, Lanikai, Oscar Schmidt, and Ohana are the big sellers. they sell way more than Pono since they are in many of the distributor chains, but yet we see very few in comparison for sale.
I wish I had sales numbers for each. it would be an interesting thing to compare apples to apples. a so many resold per 100 sold as new in a year.

Keep in mind I am not saying Pono ukes are bad. just an observation.

Well I'm just a sample of one, but I've had ukes of every price range because I like to try them all, even the cheap ones. I tend to give away the cheaper ones and not resell them. At some point the hassle of the sale isn't worth it. Most Ponos will fetch enough to be worth reselling.

Another reason I think you see a lot of Ponos for sale is that you are looking at Internet places for sale. I'll be the overwhelming majority of Ponos are bought on-line. (Same with Mya Moe). Thus the number of Ponos in this particular sub-market is particulary high. Also, I'll bet a lot of the ones you see being sold were bought used. A lot of us who buy or have bought a lot of ukes tend to buy and sell in the on-line marketplace. If I had to come up with an explanation for the relative high numbers of Ponos (and Mya Moes) you see on the Internet for sale I'd say its that they are both uniquely brands that rely heavily on the Internet for sales, and there are relatively high numbers of them.

Teek
11-26-2015, 10:41 AM
I played a friend's Pono MT tenor that was made some time ago, marked made in China and finished in Hawaii...

When were Ponos ever made in China? I had a Pono as my second uke and first tenor back in 2007, it was an older Pono, solid koa, wish I still had it, it was made in Indonesia. Just curious.

I've had four, still own the fourth, and intend to keep it. I always take the stock strings off for Southcoasts or Worths. I've never had one that was quiet that didn't need new strings, so far. One solid koa, two all solid 'hog, current is a Pro Classic spruce over rosewood. Rosewood and ebony BTW are super heavy woods. My older solid koa Pono was heavier than my Kanile'a which was a featherweight. Just my personal experience with the brand. I always rec it to anyone who asks who is looking for a solid mid level player.

Also I don't sell on here much, I go right to Craigslist now, and most of my cheaper ukes were either sold long ago when the market was better or given away.

Mya Moe, eh, I've not been impressed with the build quality or sound for the price.

Rodney.
11-26-2015, 11:10 AM
When were Ponos ever made in China? I had a Pono as my second uke and first tenor back in 2007, it was an older Pono, solid koa, wish I still had it, it was made in Indonesia. Just curious.



They're were originally made in Indonesia, later they made a deal with a Chinese factory. AFAIK they're now both made in Indonesia and China. There are fake Pono's around from China. The real ones made in China should also have a label 'setup in Ohau Hawaii', and the serial number somewhere on the neck. The first digits of that number is the build year.
I need a Pono. Baritone. Spruce. Cutaway. Now.

bunnyf
11-26-2015, 11:21 AM
Just bought a used Pono abc-pc. So, sample of one, here's why this lady sold. This was her entry level instrument that she got from HMS 3mo ago (who gets this nice a uke for number 1?). Anyway, she gave up the uke, if she had played long enough to have discovered UU, it would have been on the marketplace instead of CL. As others have said, it's a popular mid-priced prod. uke, so I'm guessin you see a lot cuz there are a lot. They are worth enough to consider selling long distance, paying shipping. I'm sure there are tons of Lanikais and Kalas being sold locally on CL.

Kiwiohana
11-26-2015, 11:23 AM
AFAIK they're now both made in Indonesia and China.

Nope, they have discontinued production in China entirely, due to logistic issues with the remote location. All new Ponos are only made in Indonesia and finished in Hawaii. And they are gorgeous!

sam13
11-26-2015, 12:54 PM
They're were originally made in Indonesia, later they made a deal with a Chinese factory. AFAIK they're now both made in Indonesia and China. There are fake Pono's around from China. The real ones made in China should also have a label 'setup in Ohau Hawaii', and the serial number somewhere on the neck. The first digits of that number is the build year.
I need a Pono. Baritone. Spruce. Cutaway. Now.

I have a RBSHC Spruce top. I highly recommend them.

hawaii 50
11-26-2015, 03:25 PM
Nope, they have discontinued production in China entirely, due to logistic issues with the remote location. All new Ponos are only made in Indonesia and finished in Hawaii. And they are gorgeous!


all the Ponos are built and finished in Java.Indonesia...they have no one here at Pono doing finish.....Ryan does only the finish on the Ko'olau ukes.....

Kiwiohana
11-26-2015, 06:20 PM
all the Ponos are built and finished in Java.Indonesia...they have no one here at Pono doing finish.....Ryan does only the finish on the Ko'olau ukes.....

Sorry, I was thinking of the Chinese ones being finished in Hawaii as I was typing - men can't multi task so my bad.

Rodney.
11-26-2015, 08:05 PM
Thanks for the education about Pono leaving China. I'm glad they did.

Nickie
11-27-2015, 12:47 PM
This has been an interesting thread. I've learned some things about Pono. We have a Pono dealer nearby. Ponos are rare in our club, but one friend owns one. It's a mahogany concert size with a lo G setup. It's a little heavy, yeah, but it resonates impressively for a $400 uke. I tried to get it away from her, but she won't part with it.

PereBourik
11-27-2015, 01:15 PM
This has been an interesting thread. I've learned some things about Pono. We have a Pono dealer nearby. Ponos are rare in our club, but one friend owns one. It's a mahogany concert size with a lo G setup. It's a little heavy, yeah, but it resonates impressively for a $400 uke. I tried to get it away from her, but she won't part with it.

I agree about the thread.

I have a Pono ATD. It is my first good ukulele. A sound cannon and beautifully finished, great sustain and tone. It was a bargain. I don't intend to ever let it reach the Marketplace.

Mattyukaholic
11-27-2015, 10:48 PM
I honestly don't think anything compares to a Pono at their price points for their entry level line. Where else to you get a perfectly bound fretboard, silky smooth frets and high quality finish? Also you get a truss rod on the tenor and Bari models. I just think they're amazing for their cost.

sealcove
11-29-2015, 05:25 AM
I just started playing uke again with a Pono AT. I keep doing an instrument oscillation, where I get a uke, enjoy it, but then decide that it is too much on top of guitar and mandolin. My problem is that I like nice instruments, and the first two trips through the cycle were with a Kamaka tenor and a Collings UT1. This time, I decided that perhaps I should get something less expensive, and I was a bit worried if the Pono AT would make me happy compared to what I am used to. My concern was unfounded; I am quite pleased with the tone, volume and playable setup of the Pono. At this price point, I wont feel bad holding onto it if I go through a down cycle again.

Somewhere between the Kamaka and the Collings, I also had a higher end Pono that I purchased used in the marketplace here. It seemed like a nice instrument too, though perhaps a bit lacking in terms of projection. At the time it seemed like it may have been too heavily finished, but that was just a guess. That said, the lightly finished AT attracted me for that reason, and it sure does project well.

tigersister
11-29-2015, 06:50 AM
Or, jump one step further directly to the endgame: buy a guitar.

I bought a Pono guitar. Does that mean I get bonus points? Or do I lose a turn? :confused:

tigersister
11-29-2015, 06:59 AM
There seems to be a lot of Pono love on UU, which may be why people choose to list their Ponos here. From my experience Pono and Koalau don't have a lot of name recognition in most of the local uke circles I've been in. When I had mine, people were curious about the brand and usually pretty impressed with it.

hawaii 50
11-29-2015, 07:03 AM
I bought a Pono guitar. Does that mean I get bonus points? Or do I lose a turn? :confused:

where did you get your guitar from...direct from Pono in Wahiawa? best kept secret in the guitar world...haha...:)

Rodney.
11-29-2015, 07:11 AM
I bought a Pono guitar. Does that mean I get bonus points? Or do I lose a turn? :confused:

Nice, which one do you have? I really like the C-30DC.

tigersister
11-29-2015, 10:21 AM
where did you get your guitar from...direct from Pono in Wahiawa? best kept secret in the guitar world...haha...:)

I bought it off eBay when Pono was listing them at steep discounts. Our guitar player friends are blown away by the quality and sound. I've had many offers on it. I could probably make a profit, but I don't see myself parting with it anytime soon.


Nice, which one do you have? I really like the C-30DC.

I have a cedar topped palor guitar. Model OP-10 DC.

coolkayaker1
11-29-2015, 01:58 PM
I bought a Pono guitar. Does that mean I get bonus points? Or do I lose a turn? :confused:

It means you win the game, t-sis. You win the game. ;)

igorthebarbarian
11-29-2015, 02:19 PM
I read this entire thread, including a weird detour on rappsy, and agree with most of the points. I do agree with the thinking that only decent/mid-range ukes end up on the marketplace here. You rarely see a Lanikai or Rogue here. Those lower-end ones end up on local Craigslist posts. In fact, when I see a Pono on my local Phoenix Craigslist, it is a "wow" because it's so unusual there.

If you have a nice, quality uke, you're probably going to buy/sell it here on the UU Forums --- assuming you're "in the know" and are a user here. I have had nothing but good experiences buying ukes here from other UU'ers. I have never sold any of mine though thru the UU Marketplace.

As for the Pono, I love the look of them - and their wonderful HMS videos - but they're a little too rich for my blood, and I'm trying to go laminates-only nowadays in AZ.

Ukeananda
12-04-2015, 06:54 AM
I just started playing uke again with a Pono AT. I keep doing an instrument oscillation, where I get a uke, enjoy it, but then decide that it is too much on top of guitar and mandolin. My problem is that I like nice instruments, and the first two trips through the cycle were with a Kamaka tenor and a Collings UT1. This time, I decided that perhaps I should get something less expensive, and I was a bit worried if the Pono AT would make me happy compared to what I am used to. My concern was unfounded; I am quite pleased with the tone, volume and playable setup of the Pono. At this price point, I wont feel bad holding onto it if I go through a down cycle again.

Somewhere between the Kamaka and the Collings, I also had a higher end Pono that I purchased used in the marketplace here. It seemed like a nice instrument too, though perhaps a bit lacking in terms of projection. At the time it seemed like it may have been too heavily finished, but that was just a guess. That said, the lightly finished AT attracted me for that reason, and it sure does project well.


I hear you, same with me. I've played guitar & mando for years so my first uke was a Kanilea tenor. Wanted an instrument that would last... Then I drifted back to mandolin and sold the uke to fund my mas. About 3 years ago got reinterested in uke, so I bought a mid level Kala concert from HMS. Recently, I've been looking at a Pono tenor to add to my collection. Now this thread has got me thinking I should be rethinking a mid price uke. OTOH, I replaced a >2K Weber mando with a Chinese Eastman at 1/3 the price with no regrets.

Point is, I've sold many instruments over the years in the hunt for the Holy Grail. Maybe Ponos, for many, fill a temporary gap in that search.

martinfan
12-04-2015, 08:12 AM
These was a great question and thread.

Why lots of Ponos for sale?

A. Simply due to volume
B. Repeated problems with Ponos
C. Ponos sold to advance higher due to holding their Value and Gateway Effect

Consider the Martin Unofficial Guitar forum or the Acoustic Guitar forum. In both, there are always many Martins for sale.

Many love Martin but use them to help finance the next step up.

It appears that Ponos are highly praised, retain their value, and used to finance even more expensive ukuleles.

It was an honest observation and it provoked excellent dialog and is what makes online forums so wonderfully useful!

thanks to all!

I voted "C" for my choice.

PTOEguy
12-06-2015, 09:57 AM
Well I'm just a sample of one, but I've had ukes of every price range because I like to try them all, even the cheap ones. I tend to give away the cheaper ones and not resell them. At some point the hassle of the sale isn't worth it. Most Ponos will fetch enough to be worth reselling.

Another reason I think you see a lot of Ponos for sale is that you are looking at Internet places for sale. I'll be the overwhelming majority of Ponos are bought on-line. (Same with Mya Moe). Thus the number of Ponos in this particular sub-market is particulary high. Also, I'll bet a lot of the ones you see being sold were bought used. A lot of us who buy or have bought a lot of ukes tend to buy and sell in the on-line marketplace. If I had to come up with an explanation for the relative high numbers of Ponos (and Mya Moes) you see on the Internet for sale I'd say its that they are both uniquely brands that rely heavily on the Internet for sales, and there are relatively high numbers of them.

I think this hits it on the nose - Ponos tend to be only available online and they have a great reputation. As a result, people like me buy them and after a little bit of playing time find out that they may not be the right instrument for their style of music (true for me) or that they may have got one that underperforms (also true for me). As a result of that experience, I'm really tending towards buying things I have been able to try out. Which means that the Opio tenor I really want will have to wait until I can travel to Hawaii, and I might wind up getting a Deering banjo uke because I happened to try one and find it to have a great deal of charm for me despite its being a very unique animal compared to other banjo ukes.

shortcircuit
12-09-2015, 02:46 AM
I do NOT have UAS!!! I just belong to the uke of the month club.

Ele
12-14-2015, 08:42 PM
You may have said this in jest but I would agree!
Although not sure exactly what you mean by custom..... Are you meaning a "K" brand, or something made by Kinnard etc?
There seems to be so many variations with the Pono's....inexpensive to almost thousand now. The K brands are more consistent in their quality. The manufacturers do not mess around with different woods as much. However Kanile'a does seem to experiment with finishes and surface bling. Still their quality is exceptional from what I've see .

BB11
03-04-2016, 01:31 PM
My first Uke was a Pono w/ low g because I watched what everyone was recommending. It was a Pro Classic tenor w/wound C string from HMS. I tried to get used to it, but eventually asked Aaron what the problem may be, he said it was a higher tension Uke and the low g setup w/ wound C probably made it a little harder to play.I also noticed the thicker neck. I tried a few concerts and sold the Pono and have been a concert fan since. It's just an opinion. I guess you have to decide what's right for you. Just my 2 cents!

May I ask what is meant by higher tension? Is it the low G or in general?

Thanks.

jjdejd
03-04-2016, 01:45 PM
May I ask what is meant by higher tension? Is it the low G or in general?

Thanks.
I'll send you a PM