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plunker
11-29-2015, 09:15 AM
I am working on Harlem Nocturn in C. The fifth measure has a G# whole note. Seems like it needs a chord there. I can find one that sounds good. Any suggestions.

Camsuke
11-29-2015, 10:01 AM
Hi mate, can you post a tab or a little more information.

plunker
11-29-2015, 10:08 AM
Hi mate, can you post a tab or a little more information.
http://www.virtualsheetmusic.com/score/HL-250824.html?tab=scorch
I think this is the first page. I bought the whole thing, but I can't seem to copy it. Thanks for trying.

JustinJ
11-29-2015, 10:37 AM
I noticed in the third measure, you have an Am for four bars.

Depending on how you like the sound, you can substitute an Ami6 and Ami7 for the Ami . If you play an Ami6 on the second fret, you can slide down to the G# and play a G#mi7. Transition to an A7 from the Gmi7, transition to the Dmin

I think it may sound better after the G#mi7, if you play the A#min7 on the third fret and slide up one fret to Amin7 before transitioning to the Dmin.

These are just suggestions.

Most of the versions of this song are in the key of Bb

Chord progression in Bb 2-3 measure are Gmaj7 , 3-4 measures are Cmin6, 5th Cmaj7 , 6th measure Eb7 A7 D7 Maybe this will give you some ideas.

Jim Hanks
11-29-2015, 11:40 AM
A number of chord sheets I found suggest Am6 as JustinJ did. The "problem" is that G# note (is a flat 9 edit: oops, no it isn't) makes it a minor-major7 so it's going to sound dissonant. It's supposed to.

Strumdaddy
11-29-2015, 11:20 PM
What about going to an AmM7 (1003) for two beats then to Am7 (0000) - that way the G# is a passing note to somewhere....

Jim Hanks
11-30-2015, 01:41 AM
Could work - of course the g# is the melody whole note so "ought" to be sustained. (Edit: but you are right about AmM7 - fixed my last post)

plunker
11-30-2015, 02:38 AM
Thank you every one. I played around using your suggestions. What I found was playing an A on the 4 string, leaving the 3 open and the G# on the 2, without struming the one gives a good result. I am using a low g set up on a tenor. Thanks again.

tbeltrans
11-30-2015, 10:55 AM
To answer this, you need to specify the key the tune is in. There are several keys that use G#, so we would need to know. For each key, there is the harmonized scale, giving you the 7 diatonic chords. Some of those chords will use the G#. From there, it is really just a matter of trying the chords to hear which one(s) fit in context, much like putting a sentence together. Of course, other chords can be arrived using the relative minor scale, parallel minors/majors, typical chord subs such as tritone, etc., but usually just the diatonic harmonized scale will suffice. A very small bit of diatonic theory goes a long way to resolving these sorts of issues. Too much theory just muddies the waters.

Tony

Jim Hanks
11-30-2015, 12:07 PM
Thank you every one. I played around using your suggestions. What I found was playing an A on the 4 string, leaving the 3 open and the G# on the 2, without struming the one gives a good result. I am using a low g set up on a tenor. Thanks again.
Excellent solution. It's AmM7 leaving out the fifth and without playing the g# and a next to each. Might have to steal that one. :nana:

Jim Yates
11-30-2015, 06:02 PM
I jut tried it with E7. Since I'm not sure about the tune, I'm not sure if it'll work, but . . .