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hammer40
12-01-2015, 05:37 AM
I have a new Bari due today and I was thinking of trying a low g (GCEA) tuning on it. I have been watching Glen Rose videos where he uses this tuning, and it sounds really nice.

He mentions to just use a regular tenor uke re-entrant set and to just re-organize the strings by diameter, larger to small. I have also seen where you can just use a normal classical set, using the bottom four strings and tuning up. It is not mentioned if nylon or carbon strings are used for this, or if it matters at all, tension wise. Not sure which would be the preferred choice, I really hate loose/floppy string tensions.

I know that Southcoast has a set for this, as well as Aquilla, but I am looking at other possible alternatives, if there are any. I did see where Guadalupe strings also has a set, but at close to twenty bucks shipped, if I can avoid that I will.

If anybody uses this tuning on the baritone, would you mind posting your string set choice? I searched the threads, but mostly came up with octave tuning answers, which is not what I am after.

Kimosabe
12-01-2015, 05:50 AM
Go for the South Coast strings. You don't really need to change uke strings very often, every couple years if that.

I'm a big fan of Glen and have been for seven years or more.

They asked that famous Motown bass player how often he changed strings and he said, "Never!"

Glen's Advanced Jazz chord video is a must once you get his basics down.

Enjoy your baritone with GCEA tuning.

saltytri
12-01-2015, 05:58 AM
Either of the Southcoast LL sets will be fine and will give you tension in the correct range. You can opt for a wound G string or not.

gnordenstam
12-01-2015, 05:58 AM
I use the Southcoast Baritone linear set GCEA on mine. Love the sound.
--G

Jon Moody
12-01-2015, 07:02 AM
Go for the South Coast strings. You don't really need to change uke strings very often, every couple years if that.

I'm a big fan of Glen and have been for seven years or more.

They asked that famous Motown bass player how often he changed strings and he said, "Never!"

Glen's Advanced Jazz chord video is a must once you get his basics down.

Enjoy your baritone with GCEA tuning.

Couple of points of clarification.

If you're using wound strings on your uke, if the wrap is silvered copper, phosphor bronze or aluminum, it's going to tarnish. So, you'll likely be changing those a bit more than just the standard nylon strings even if you don't play them that often.

As for the Motown player, that's completely apples/oranges. Flatwound bass strings are revered for their broken-in, thuddy tone, which only comes into play after a couple months of breaking the strings in. Then they last for years, if not over a decade. They're also completely different than tie end wound strings, which is what ukulele strings are, so it's not really relevant.

Kimosabe
12-01-2015, 07:17 AM
Fair enough. I stand corrected about a correspondence between uke strings and bass strings.

Is tarnishing a reason for replacing? Is tarnishing change in color or corrosion?

My basic point is that even if South Coast strings are a little more expensive they last a relatively long time. Most people change their strings because they want to hear the difference in sound not because the strings wear out.

I play a couple hours a day on various ukes and I can't recall a string fraying. Been a long time. Years.

hammer40
12-01-2015, 07:27 AM
Couple of points of clarification.

If you're using wound strings on your uke, if the wrap is silvered copper, phosphor bronze or aluminum, it's going to tarnish. So, you'll likely be changing those a bit more than just the standard nylon strings even if you don't play them that often.

As for the Motown player, that's completely apples/oranges. Flatwound bass strings are revered for their broken-in, thuddy tone, which only comes into play after a couple months of breaking the strings in. Then they last for years, if not over a decade. They're also completely different than tie end wound strings, which is what ukulele strings are, so it's not really relevant.

Does GHS have something that would work for this? I would prefer a 50/50 string set up, two wound and two carbon or nylon.

Jon Moody
12-01-2015, 08:17 AM
Is tarnishing a reason for replacing? Is tarnishing change in color or corrosion?

It can be. Usually, the tarnishing of the string (due usually in part to contact with skin pH) is going to affect the tone. So while it may not feel dirty or grimy, they can sound dead and lifeless.



My basic point is that even if South Coast strings are a little more expensive they last a relatively long time. Most people change their strings because they want to hear the difference in sound not because the strings wear out.

Longevity is the hardest thing to accurately depict, as it's based on more than just how long you play your instrument. Skin pH is a huge part. We have artists that have acidic skin pH to the point where it will corrode - yeah, corrode - stainless steel strings. Another large factor is what tonal needs you want. One guy may enjoy the same set of strings on for years, whereas another guy may change his ukulele strings more regularly, because he likes a bright and snappy sound. Then there's that whole thing about what you hear/perceive, thinking that "this set has been on here for a while and it sounds good!" until they change the set and then say "Wow! I forgot how old those strings were! These new ones sound great!"

So yeah. Longevity is a truly personal thing that no one can really lay claim to.



Does GHS have something that would work for this? I would prefer a 50/50 string set up, two wound and two carbon or nylon.

I just grabbed some options and strung it up on my baritone in the office. So far so good; they tuned up fine, and didn't seem like it was pushing the limits of their ability. Give me a day or two with it, and I'll feel more comfortable making the official suggestion of gauges on it.

hammer40
12-01-2015, 08:31 AM
I just grabbed some options and strung it up on my baritone in the office. So far so good; they tuned up fine, and didn't seem like it was pushing the limits of their ability. Give me a day or two with it, and I'll feel more comfortable making the official suggestion of gauges on it.

That's awesome Jon, I appreciate the help! I'll keep an eye out for your response.

strumsilly
12-01-2015, 08:58 AM
The only wound string that seems to last as long[for me] as unwound is the freemont. I like wound strings and currently have 2 wound basses on my Loprinzi tenor but the usual aluminum/copper/silvered wounds wear and fray where they contact the frets. I too am very happy with the nonwound Southcoast linears for bari GCEA. BUT , had a real dud of a plywood baritone that came alive with the Aquila set. your mileage may vary.

Jon Moody
12-04-2015, 03:23 AM
That's awesome Jon, I appreciate the help! I'll keep an eye out for your response.

Alright, I played it for about a half hour this morning, after a couple days of tuning it up and playing. It's fine, and sounds really nice. The balance between the plain and wound strings is good in terms of tonality and tension, although it does feel really weird going from that heavier plain string to the tiny wound one. I will probably keep that set on here for a bit, as I too enjoy the 50/50 of plain/wound strings.

Strings I used are below. I've used the official GHS part number, but also included the gauge so if you wanted to find it from another brand, you could.

1st A - Part 9401 - .029 clear nylon
2nd E - Part 9402 - .033 clear nylon
3rd C - Part 9423 - .023 wound silvered copper
4th G - Part 9424 - .030 wound silvered copper

Hope that helps.

kissing
12-04-2015, 08:13 AM
D'addario Pro-Arte Light classical guitar set. Use the DGBE strings (4th-1st) to tune a baritone uke to GCEA (low G).

Easiest solution as they are widely available.

Normal tension set would work as GCEA for concert and tenor. On a baritone, Light tension set.