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View Full Version : How do I tie this fancy knot?



farmerjones
12-02-2015, 01:55 PM
I'm thinking it may be time to change the strings on my baritone. It still has the same strings as when I picked it up from the store a month ago. I have no idea how long they had it, or how often it has been played there. I remember when I bought it, the intonation was a bit better, so I want to see how a string change goes before I attempt any custom setup work.

Here are some pictures of the knot:
86010
86011

If anyone knows a link to a video that shows how this is done, I would be most appreciative. :cheers:

Kayak Jim
12-02-2015, 02:06 PM
I don't have a video but the knot is not so fancy, just looped around twice. Untie it slowly and you can figure out how it's tied.

farmerjones
12-02-2015, 02:15 PM
I've seen videos of that, and it seems easy enough. They just seemed to loop it twice like you said and then tie a knot. I'm more wondering about how all the strings are tied together on the saddle.

janeray1940
12-02-2015, 02:21 PM
Midway down this page (http://www.tikiking.com/how_to_change_strings.html) there's a step by step illustration. It's easy!

deschutestrout
12-02-2015, 02:35 PM
And, no need to tie them all together. Snug your double loop and you're good to go. Where you see them tied "together" is simply running the tag ends under the adjoining knot. Totally unnecessary in my opinion.

pritch
12-02-2015, 04:10 PM
Totally unnecessary in my opinion.

I'll second that. Each string trimmed to the same length looks tidy enough, actually it looks tidier to me. Each to his own.

Futurethink
12-02-2015, 04:54 PM
The page linked to in Janeray's post looked pretty clear. I've added it to my bookmark list.

Here's a video I found useful;
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kyv7uOiXsbM

kypfer
12-02-2015, 09:21 PM
Tying all the strings together as in the OP's picture, if that's what you want, is best achieved by tying the treble string first with sufficient "tail" to lie across the width of the bridge (and then a bit). This "tail" is then incorporated within the tie for the next string, and so on across the bridge.

Aesthetically I like it. Practically it can be a nuisance if one has to replace just one string and wish to retain the effect (all strings need to be slackened).

As always, YMMV :)

phil hague
12-02-2015, 11:36 PM
Hi, There is no knot. They just loop round themselves. leave a long tail which is then held by the next string.
Just do one string at a time and copy the ones you have not yet removed. When you have done one uke you will be ok.
Good luck,Phil.

Louis0815
12-03-2015, 05:46 AM
And should you really go for the tails as shown in the pictures I would point them all to the other side: All open ends at first string prevents your strumming arm from any potential collisions/scratches (strings can have sharp ends....)

70sSanO
12-03-2015, 09:41 AM
Tying all the strings together as in the OP's picture, if that's what you want, is best achieved by tying the treble string first with sufficient "tail" to lie across the width of the bridge (and then a bit). This "tail" is then incorporated within the tie for the next string, and so on across the bridge.

Aesthetically I like it. Practically it can be a nuisance if one has to replace just one string and wish to retain the effect (all strings need to be slackened).

As always, YMMV :)

That is a really good point I hadn't thought of. I always thought the tails looked really cool, but I never thought of the hassle of replacing a single sting.

John

spookelele
12-03-2015, 10:12 AM
There is no knot. They just loop round themselves.

Isn't that what a knot is? something that loops around itself?

UkerDanno
12-03-2015, 10:21 AM
another video...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LwNDkh43oqc

if you start with the 4th string and wrap the other way, the tails will point down and away from your arm. Tuck the 2nd and 1st strings before tightening completely for a clean look.

Calypso
12-04-2015, 03:33 AM
Here's a video which helped me in the early days. Very clear, concise explanation of how to tie that knot - and about the triple loop method which is very strong and will ensure your strings don't undo themselves.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lDJywsNAF1g

Tudorp
12-04-2015, 04:20 AM
That is a basic method to use. I use it for most of mine. Very simple to accomplish. Another alternative is this one that I use from time to time. These are bone beads that I have drilled for this purpose. Adds a cool detail to the uke, and also easy to do and very secure. http://i1238.photobucket.com/albums/ff490/Tudorp/P1040823.jpg

natchez
12-04-2015, 05:16 AM
I'll second that. Each string trimmed to the same length looks tidy enough, actually it looks tidier to me. Each to his own.

And, if you want to change one string, tying them like this can be a pain.

Brian1
12-04-2015, 07:21 AM
Having loose tails is a pet peeve of mine. I noticed the video links don't show the method shown in the picture. (and thats a bit frustrating)

I figured out that if you do the 1st and 4th strings first and don't pull them tight and twist the string around itself in opposite directions so the tails point toward each other you can then put on the second and third strings twisting the string around itself in the opposite direction as the strings on its closest end the tails on 3&4 and 1&2 will point toward each other and those tails can be tied into position to allow the tail of of the inner strings to be tied to the loop of the outer strings.

I forgot to mention that when you tie the inner strings the tails of the loose outer strings get tucked into the knot before it is pulled tight... depending on how long you leave the tail you can tie the 1st and 4th string into the knots of 3&2.

It is a pain to do this and I wish I knew an easier way, but it looks so much better. It always stands out to me when someone with a high end decked-out ukulele doesn't take the care to make the ends of their strings look nice.

UkerDanno
12-04-2015, 02:18 PM
this is something like what I shoot for, on the only bridge tie uke I have.
86115

kypfer
12-04-2015, 10:12 PM
I figured out that if you do the 1st and 4th strings first and don't pull them tight and twist the string around itself in opposite directions so the tails point toward each other you can then put on the second and third strings twisting the string around itself in the opposite direction as the strings on its closest end the tails on 3&4 and 1&2 will point toward each other and those tails can be tied into position to allow the tail of of the inner strings to be tied to the loop of the outer strings.


I like the sound of this :)

I'll try and remember this for next time, thank you :)