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Irish Uke Tom
12-05-2015, 01:35 AM
Ok. So here goes:

Below are the frequencies for low g tuning.
G = 196 Hz
C = 262 Hz
E = 330 Hz
A = 440 Hz

I want to tune it down a bit, by 8hz, or at least be able to measure it accurately using my tuner. I use a snark tuner which has no back button or frequency setting, just the power button on the front. It shows -50 and +50 on either side of the note showing at the top middle. Could someone explain what these values mean? There are 14 lines either side of the note that ascend and descend.

Any help would be appreciated. Just so you know I can hear differences when I make minor adjustments to my tuning, I just don't know how to be precise.

:cool:

Irish Uke Tom
12-05-2015, 01:39 AM
86117


This is what the tuner looks like. Sorry for the terrible photo. Although you do get a nice sideways veiw of the mighty river Lagan,

Croaky Keith
12-05-2015, 02:25 AM
That looks like my tuner, a Snark SN-6.

(Other than that I'm sorry but I am too new to ukes to be able to help.)

Irish Uke Tom
12-05-2015, 05:21 AM
hi uke1950. Thanks for replying. Mine isn't the SN-6 because it has more than one button. I'm a newbie myself :) only been at this since june!

joekulele
12-05-2015, 05:56 AM
If your clip-on doesn't have Hz calibration, you could try a smart phone app that uses the phone's mic. I bought one years ago called Pitchbot, but I'm sure there are a bunch of free ones available.

Irish Uke Tom
12-05-2015, 06:34 AM
cheers man. always forget about those apps!

stevepetergal
12-05-2015, 07:12 AM
The 50 refers to a quarter tone (50% of a half step). So, for example, a G tuned at your Snark's -50 would be exactly centered between an accurate F# and a G. +50 would be between a G and a G#.
You can mostly ignore the lines on either side of the center green line. They're only there to give you some reference as to how far you are from your target. The Hz numbers are there mostly to confuse you, by the way. Utterly unnecessary to over-complicate tuning your instrument. Get your strings tuned to their green lines and you'll be fine.

Jim Hanks
12-05-2015, 08:19 AM
What you really need is a chromatic tuner that allows you to adjust the reference frequency to 432hz. In lieu of that, you have to figure out how many cents flat of 440hz is 432hz. g# is 415Hz so 432 lies at 8/25 flat of 440 or 32 cents. So if you are trying to tune your A string to 432hz, the needle is going to be way over to the left - if you think of your tuner as the top half of a clock face, the needle would be almost exactly at 10 o'clock

Irish Uke Tom
12-05-2015, 09:13 AM
What you really need is a chromatic tuner that allows you to adjust the reference frequency to 432hz. In lieu of that, you have to figure out how many cents flat of 440hz is 432hz. g# is 415Hz so 432 lies at 8/25 flat of 440 or 32 cents. So if you are trying to tune your A string to 432hz, the needle is going to be way over to the left - if you think of your tuner as the top half of a clock face, the needle would be almost exactly at 10 o'clock


Thanks you Mr.Hanks! This was what I needed to know but didn't ask for very well! It's probably pointless straying off that norm but each uke probably has its own sweet spot. Is it nonsense to say that? Stevepetergal has me doubting myself but this thought just crossed my mind after some wine haha.

FourSilverMoonbeams
12-05-2015, 10:41 AM
Cosmic pitch!

Jim Hanks
12-05-2015, 10:44 AM
Not nonsense but I really doubt the "sweet spot" would be so narrow as 8hz. I think tuning down or up is a great way to explore different sounds. I love the sound and feel of Bb tuning on tenor ukes so I think that is my sweet spot much more so than normal C tuning. In my opinion you'd be better off tuning to a known pitch standard than an arbitrary one, e.g. tune down to g# and see how you like you. It's easier to tune to the green line and if you need to get back to C tuning you can get there with a capo. But hey, it's your uke so if you want to tune to 432Hz, have at it.

FourSilverMoonbeams
12-05-2015, 10:49 AM
432 isn't all that arbitrary- http://www.collective-evolution.com/2013/12/21/heres-why-you-should-convert-your-music-to-432hz/

(Not that I'm endorsing this.........)