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DownUpDave
12-07-2015, 10:23 AM
Some times I can be stubborn about dumb things. I have a Webber custom tenor made by David Webber. When I received it this uke jumped up to first place in my herd......until the LfdM showed up.

I had the Webber strung with South Coast HML-RW and loved the sound. I broke a string a few months ago and went on a string experimention spree with this uke. Nothing really made me happy and I had thoughts of selling it. I finally put on some HML-RW again (last of the old patch) and I am back in love with the sound.

A wise luither said more ukes get sold before given a fair chance. In my case it is " a simple string change can save a uke from a trip to the Market Place".

Almost orphaned

8620286201

Camsuke
12-07-2015, 11:04 AM
This story reminds me of when our children were toddlers. Whenever they became tired of certain toys we'd pack them (the toys) in the wardrobe for a few weeks and then bring them back out. The kids always fell in love with them once again!

ukuleleden
12-07-2015, 11:28 AM
Confucious says: A smart man buys a great ukulele; the genius in him keeps it.

Nickie
12-07-2015, 11:54 AM
Wow, what a nice uke! That's almost like NUD. Congrats on re-finding it. I think I'm gonna do a string change on my Ohana, I'm not liking it these days. I sure like the Lava strings but it buzzes like hell. Intonation's off too, gonna lower the saddle back where it was.....

DownUpDave
12-07-2015, 12:43 PM
I am not sure that comparing ukulele enthusiasts to toddlers is a good way to start a Tuesday.

My wife would disagree with you there Bill...........just sayin' :p

ksiegel
12-07-2015, 12:50 PM
My wife would disagree with you there Bill...........just sayin' :p

Yeah, toddlers are often more mature about these things than we are...

Jim Hanks
12-07-2015, 01:54 PM
we'd pack them (the toys) in the wardrobe for a few weeks and then bring them back out
glad you clarified that. ;) :biglaugh:

rappsy
12-07-2015, 02:11 PM
This story reminds me of when our children were toddlers. Whenever they became tired of certain toys we'd pack them (the toys) in the wardrobe for a few weeks and then bring them back out. The kids always fell in love with them once again!


glad you clarified that. ;) :biglaugh:

I was thinking along Jim's lines. Glad you clarified that as well, Campbell.


We know you better than that, Dave. It probably wasn't that close to the marketplace. Simon would have unplugged your computer before you did that. Besides, you have to keep it for a while so I can play it....

Dan Uke
12-07-2015, 02:16 PM
it's just a matter of time...

bonesoup
12-07-2015, 11:04 PM
I was thinking along Jim's lines. Glad you clarified that as well, Campbell.


We know you better than that, Dave. It probably wasn't that close to the marketplace. Simon would have unplugged your computer before you did that. Besides, you have to keep it for a while so I can play it....

Yeah Dave, no selling until Lenny and I have made it to your demo day!

PhilUSAFRet
12-08-2015, 12:35 AM
I once traded a sweet little Mele soprano without searching for the right strings. Still regret that.

Patrick Madsen
12-08-2015, 05:42 AM
I came really close to selling my Webber Baritone. It was the first one David made. I even lent it out to a guy for a week or so as he was interested. He brought it back saying it was too good for him. I put it back in the stack and kind of forgot about it because I was playing a '62 Martin bari.

A while later I thought I'd bring it to a gig rather than the Martin and man it just sang with a deep resonant sound. So much so I haven't picked up the Martin since and play it exclusively doing gigs. Using a pick really brings out a guitar sound using South Coast Strings. It's my go to instrument now and will never sell.

Same thing is happening now with my Chennell archtop bari. It came with nylon strings and intonation was pretty bad considering it's custom. Last week I took it to my local luthier to try steel strings and a setup. Really changed the whole energy of it. Took it back yesterday to get the nut lowered a bit and put on a 3mm heavier steel set. I think it's really going to sound pretty good when I get it back Thursday. The beauty of a floating bridge is it can take steel strings. I'm going from a 10 to 13mm set

David Weber makes some of the finest guitars and ukes I've ever played. He's been at it for over 35 years I think. He works out of the place Larrivee had when he first started as a one man shop in North Van.Davids ukes are so clean, light and have a wonderful deep sound. I'm surprised more Canadians haven't found him yet considering the price of the Canadian dollar.

I agree Dave, Webber makes a mighty fine instrument. I'm seriously thinking on getting him to make me a tenor guitar next. If you ever decide to sell that tenor, I'd like first dibs if possible.

DownUpDave
12-08-2015, 05:59 AM
I came really close to selling my Webber Baritone. It was the first one David made. I even lent it out to a guy for a week or so as he was interested. He brought it back saying it was too good for him. I put it back in the stack and kind of forgot about it because I was playing a '62 Martin bari.

A while later I thought I'd bring it to a gig rather than the Martin and man it just sang with a deep resonant sound. So much so I haven't picked up the Martin since and play it exclusively doing gigs. Using a pick really brings out a guitar sound using South Coast Strings. It's my go to instrument now and will never sell.

Same thing is happening now with my Chennell archtop bari. It came with nylon strings and intonation was pretty bad considering it's custom. Last week I took it to my local luthier to try steel strings and a setup. Really changed the whole energy of it. Took it back yesterday to get the nut lowered a bit and put on a 3mm heavier steel set. I think it's really going to sound pretty good when I get it back Thursday. The beauty of a floating bridge is it can take steel strings. I'm going from a 10 to 13mm set

David Weber makes some of the finest guitars and ukes I've ever played. He's been at it for over 35 years I think. He works out of the place Larrivee had when he first started as a one man shop in North Van.Davids ukes are so clean, light and have a wonderful deep sound. I'm surprised more Canadians haven't found him yet considering the price of the Canadian dollar.

I agree Dave, Webber makes a mighty fine instrument. I'm seriously thinking on getting him to make me a tenor guitar next. If you ever decide to sell that tenor, I'd like first dibs if possible.


Great story Patrick, thanks for that. I am glad you are getting your arch top figured out, it deserves it as do so many instruments.

I emailed David a couple months ago regarding a tenor guitar. We hammered out some build details, he uses his parlor guitar body. He can do a scale length around 22" and will do a 1-3/8"or 1-1/2" nut width. Bluedog guitar has a video recording of one of his tenor guitars on their youtube channel. It is the nicest tenor guitar I have heard. I am really happy with my new Blueridge tenor guitar but if I every get a custom built David Webber will be the guy doing it.