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View Full Version : How to make multi-track YouTube videos??



uke puke
04-03-2009, 02:30 PM
Guys, I am wondering how to make multi layered tracks to post on you tube...

What programs or software should i use to make a multitrack video, that has several layers of recorded audio? I have seen several videos where people will lay down a base track, and then layer backup vocals or solos over top. How do you do this?

Dont know if this is the right board to post this question. Any help is much appreciated!

uke puke
04-03-2009, 02:31 PM
P.S. I am hoping for free software that i can download...

grappler
04-03-2009, 02:40 PM
im pretty sure you can use Windows Movie maker.
If you have a mac, theres garage band and imovie 08 or imovie HD

Fred Miu
04-03-2009, 02:50 PM
im pretty sure you can use Windows Movie maker.
If you have a mac, theres garage band and imovie 08 or imovie HD

and that stuff free on your computer.

uke puke
04-03-2009, 03:09 PM
word. i dont have a webcam yet... can i still use movie maker, and just do a slideshow or something until i get a webcam??

Yopparai
04-03-2009, 03:25 PM
For the PC, I use Audacity for the audio mixing. Its free and it does pretty much everything I need, and then some. Normally I use it to record while I am running the camera. I can tweek the mix and balance things out like I want, and then export it as an mp3 (or wav).

If you don't need to layer or composite video, then MS Moviemaker that comes with the computer should be sufficient to handle the video end.

Yopparai
04-03-2009, 03:26 PM
word. i dont have a webcam yet... can i still use movie maker, and just do a slideshow or something until i get a webcam??
Yep. you can put pictures in the timeline and set how long they display, and do fades from one to the next.

uke puke
04-03-2009, 05:06 PM
For the PC, I use Audacity for the audio mixing. Its free and it does pretty much everything I need, and then some. Normally I use it to record while I am running the camera. I can tweek the mix and balance things out like I want, and then export it as an mp3 (or wav).

If you don't need to layer or composite video, then MS Moviemaker that comes with the computer should be sufficient to handle the video end.

Thanks man! Just installed audacity, and it seems pretty easy to use. I was trying to use demo versions of ableton live, and pro tools. I couldnt figure out how to do anything.. Thanks again.:shaka:

Yopparai
04-03-2009, 05:47 PM
Did you download the Lame stuff for exporting to an mp3? should be somewhere on the same page that got you the audacity download. It is free as well, but you have to have it to make mp3 formatted files. (you can make wav formatted files without it)

Monkeyswithladders
04-03-2009, 07:19 PM
I think I use a pretty inefficient process, but it works for me and I like it, so I'll probably keep doing it this way. Keep in mind I've only been doing this for about 5 months and don't really know what I'm doing. I basically knew what kind of finished product I wanted to make, and this was the best way I could figure out how to get there.

I use a condenser mic and have it plugged into my camcorder through the external mic jack. I record every part straight to my camera so each part has its own file and I just line them up and edit them once I'm finished with the recording.

1) So first I record a core rhythm part to my camera (uke or drums)
2) Then I put it on my ipod
3) Then I set my camera up again and record following parts while listening to my ipod-- then all the parts will end up in the same rhythm.
4) Now I upload all the other parts and line up the files with each other using Magix. Now I have a song with, let's say, 4 audio and 4 video tracks.
5) Because each part's audio and video is linked together, the video editing takes no time at all. It's just a matter of deleting the video for every part except the one I want to show at different points of the video. That's why a lot of my videos have the double exposure look-- at many points I'll just leave 2 or more video files up at once.

The pros:
It makes it easy for me to record just a part or two as I have time and do a song over many days.
I can shoot video elsewhere and take it home to record backing tracks around it.
I just simply like being free from my computer during the recording process. I don't know why.

The cons:
I have a mini dv camera, so if I do 3 takes on drums and it takes 10 minutes, it then takes another 10 minutes to upload it on my computer before I can even see how the mic picked up the sound or if I forgot to plug in the preamp or some other stupid thing. So it's pretty annoying. If I can upgrade to a hard disk camera soon it will cut my recording time in half, so I reeeeally want one, lol

grappler
04-03-2009, 09:50 PM
thanks for that monkeywithladders.
i found that informative!
Thats a pretty simple way to layer your editings!
good stuff

SamWise
04-04-2009, 12:48 AM
My system, possibly easier:

1) Record a core track. I usually video this, so ideally uke and vocals together. I would run the camera, and also Audacity (or Sonar in my case). The tricksy part is that you need to get the balance between uke and vocals right, because if they're both on one track, there's no messing with the balance later

2) Record any other tracks. I might or might not video these, depending how long I want to spend building up my video, but I might add more ukes, guitar, bass, backing vocals - go crazy, experiment, see what works. I would use my headphones at this stage so that I can hear the original track without getting it leaking into the mic and polluting my other tracks.

3) Mix down. I'll play around with the levels of the tracks, add some reverb, maybe some other effects depending on what I'm looking for. The more you do this, the better you get at spotting what will work, but you never get perfet.

4) Export to wav (not mp3 - you lose some quality going to that format, so why do it? The wav file is just going to get imported into a video anyway, so the size is not important)

5) Do the video. I generally use Windows Movie Maker, because it's relatively simple. In the simplest cases, I'll import the video and I'll uncheck the "break into clips" option, so I just get one long chunk. I'll split it at the point I see myself click on the computer to start the recording. I'll then drop the audio in, jiggle things around til it's in synch (you can have the sound the camera recorded and the sound from the audio running together, so you can tell when it's right). Bish bash bosh.

If I'm feeling clever, I might cut in some bits of me playing other instruments, or very rarely I might seperately film an MTV style video, but normally it's the above. Movie Maker makes nice compact files, so they're quick to upload. If I'm doing a collaboration, I'll use Multiquence to run the videos side by side, but it's much more of a faff, and the files it outputs are WAY bigger.

Pippin
04-04-2009, 01:03 AM
What a lot of pros do is take the original multi-track recording and play to it on the video without an audio layer. Then, they re-record the video in every different "set" or location used in the same manner. In the end, the entire production can be edited to perfect timing with the music with a program like Vegas or Sound Forge. There are lots of professional video editing tools out there that have a time-line editing feature. IF you look around, you can find some cheap knock-offs in the shareware world.

casetone2514
04-04-2009, 01:43 AM
I don't suppose I have much to add. All the bases seem to have been covered.

I record each track as I lay it down both on video and as a separate audio track.

When all the takes are in the can (do you like the movie jargon?) I mix the audio and put it in to Moviemaker. Then I mute all the video takes and edit them onto the premixed audio. It means you don't get any audio jumps or inconsistencies and if you don't get the video edit 100% spot on it doesn't show (sound) on the audio.

Tony

UKISOCIETY
04-04-2009, 04:33 AM
I don't suppose I have much to add. All the bases seem to have been covered.

I record each track as I lay it down both on video and as a separate audio track.

When all the takes are in the can (do you like the movie jargon?) I mix the audio and put it in to Moviemaker. Then I mute all the video takes and edit them onto the premixed audio. It means you don't get any audio jumps or inconsistencies and if you don't get the video edit 100% spot on it doesn't show (sound) on the audio.

Tony

The only difference with my technique is that I don't mute the video when I'm putting the video and audio together in Moviemaker. I find that I can synch the audio better that way-once it sounds like one audio source, I then mute the video.

casetone2514
04-04-2009, 07:03 AM
The only difference with my technique is that I don't mute the video when I'm putting the video and audio together in Moviemaker. I find that I can synch the audio better that way-once it sounds like one audio source, I then mute the video.

Yeah. That's probably a lot better. Me stoopid.

musicmonsterw
06-13-2010, 08:04 AM
Thanks. These are all great tips! Does anyone use a Mac?

alexrock23
06-14-2010, 01:48 AM
thanks Samwise for post tutorial. This was nice of you and very informative. maybe you can help me on something I have trying to be able to figure out for months now.

Freeda
07-01-2014, 03:33 AM
Just bumping this old but useful thread. Anyone got anything to add in the last few years?