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RLM3121
12-17-2015, 01:28 PM
I see a lot of really nice ukes for sale in the marketplace forum. It made me wonder why they no longer held that special place in the owner's heart?

I own a Collings that I really like and wouldn't think of parting with it. I also must note that it is the only ukulele I own.

I'm just courious what made these special ukes not so special.-Ray

Ukulele Eddie
12-17-2015, 02:00 PM
I see a lot of really nice ukes for sale in the marketplace forum. It made me wonder why they no longer held that special place in the owner's heart?

I own a Collings that I really like and wouldn't think of parting with it. I also must note that it is the only ukulele I own.

I'm just courious what made these special ukes not so special.-Ray

First, I have two Collings and believe that some of them are among the best values out there.

Directly to your question, I went through a period where I wanted to experience many different ukes on one hand, and on the other, agreed (at that time) with my wife since I was consulting (not working regularly) that I would limit my ukes to two (then). So, I rotated through ukes very quickly to experience many. I absolutely regret some of those that I sold, but I love the variety and learning from this experience. I've owned over three dozen ukes in my 2.33 years of "ukiness".

I am now gainfully employed and own, uh, more than two. With another Kinnard and a Beau Hannam in process.

spongeuke
12-17-2015, 02:16 PM
Realized I have too many in that some aren't being played. To make the thinning less stressful I set a criteria that they should be about as old as I am (72)

hollisdwyer
12-17-2015, 03:12 PM
... I've owned over three dozen ukes in my 2.33 years of "ukiness"....

That's a hell of a rate of churn. I'm impressed!

I've have the same rational as you for buying and selling ukes. It's a wonderful journey. I also regret selling some of the ukes I've owned but it's all part of the learning experience.

RLM3121
12-17-2015, 03:16 PM
You have some nice ukes and a very understanding wife!

70sSanO
12-17-2015, 03:20 PM
My first ukulele was a KoAloha soprano. Pretty nice for a first uke. But after I got a tenor I never played it and I never really got attached to it. I sold it and bought a second tenor. I haven't sold any ukuleles since.

John

hollisdwyer
12-17-2015, 03:44 PM
You have some nice ukes and a very understanding wife!

If you are talking to me, yes, I do have a very understanding wife but everything has its limits. I'll be retiring next year and we will probably move to an apartment so 'downsizing' is the word of the year for us from now on.

pritch
12-17-2015, 04:11 PM
I own a Collings that I really like and wouldn't think of parting with it.

If you're only going to have the one that's a nice one to have. I'm still in the acquisition phase and haven't sold any, but I'm happy with what I have for now.
Of course if it suddenly rained gold bars...

Doc_J
12-17-2015, 04:28 PM
Lots of good reasons to sell great instruments. While Collings ukes are great, other ukes can be preferred over them. For me a Kinnard replaced the spot my Collings had. My Moore Bettah caused me to sell my koa Ko'olau and koa Kanile'a. I'm not trying to be snobby. I swear I could have been happy with any of these as my primary instrument. But I can hear and feel the differences, and made decisions to sell based on those.

I've had other reasons to sell great ukes, the sound of one string (regardless of the actual string type on it) wasn't what I wanted to hear. I sold a Kamaka concert because the A-string never sounded quite right to me at the second fret. Sometimes a G-string can be over-powering.

Sometimes, it's playability (a neck can be too thin or too thick). If it doesn't feel right, I won't keep it. I sold great ukes because of string spacing (too wide or too narrow) and fretboard height. The small things that can bother a person are numerous.

Another factor is just trying out and learning about new ukes.

70sSanO
12-17-2015, 04:47 PM
At the risk of speaking out of turn, and getting the ire of a number of people, this thread has gotten way too expensive for me. If fact in a lot if ways, this forum has gotten to become an exercise in name dropping at a private club.

There are a lot of people who can only afford what they have and are saving to find a better instrument and it has to be disheartening when they read such cavalier comments about discarding excellent instruments like yesterday's garbage.

Sorry for offending people.

John

Doc_J
12-17-2015, 05:31 PM
At the risk of speaking out of turn, and getting the ire of a number of people, this thread has gotten way too expensive for me. If fact in a lot if ways, this forum has gotten to become an exercise in name dropping at a private club.

There are a lot of people who can only afford what they have and are saving to find a better instrument and it has to be disheartening when they read such cavalier comments about discarding excellent instruments like yesterday's garbage.

Sorry for offending people.

John

John,

I appreciate your thoughts. When expensive ukes are mentioned, please don't feel it's name-dropping or to make anyone feel bad. When I make a comment about an instrument, I give my honest opinions (I, for one, am not cavalier). The top uke makers have worked hard to make wonderful instruments. They should be applauded for striving always to excel. Irrespective to sound and feel, a custom instrument is also very personal and a connection between the builder and the player. Custom ukes are exactly why many folks may sell wonderful production instruments, such as a Collings or Kamaka.

kohanmike
12-17-2015, 06:11 PM
I was caught up in UAS for the first year of playing ukulele and accumulated 16, mostly below $200. I sold some because they were too similar to the others, or they just didn't sound as good. I held on to 8 for a few months, then decided I would only keep the ones I really liked and sounded the best, so I now have 4 and so far after almost a year, it's stayed that way, BUT, in the last year I started playing bass uke, and of course, I'm up to 8 now, but so far because they're all different enough, I don't intend to sell any.

Ukulele Eddie
12-17-2015, 06:42 PM
You have some nice ukes and a very understanding wife!

To whom is this comment addressed?

Ukulele Eddie
12-17-2015, 06:53 PM
There are a lot of people who can only afford what they have and are saving to find a better instrument and it has to be disheartening when they read such cavalier comments about discarding excellent instruments like yesterday's garbage.

Sorry for offending people.

John

I've NEVER heard anyone put down somebody's uke on this forum, regardless of price. So, similarly, one shouldn't be offended because some others choose to spend serious (relatively) on ukes. It doesn't matter what one spends, it only matters how much they love their uke. I love my Larrivee as much (and more, in some cases) as my more expensive instruments. It's a phenomenal value. And while still out of many people's financial reach at about $900, it's relatively achievable by many people.

Bill1
12-17-2015, 07:14 PM
The benefit of finding a population of ukulele owners who will sell magnificant ukuleles on a whim is that those who are looking can pick up some bargains. The size of the bargain may not be apparent until 2020+, but it will be amazing given the quality of ukes like the Collings and others already discussed in this thread. And it wont necessaryily be the financial value which is amazing, it will be the non-financial value. Patient ukulele enthusiasts are making the most of threads like this.
Just on the costs of enjoying buying ukes. My most recent purchase is a Mahalo U30. I have lucked into a good one for $31 delivered. I have not changed the strings, just let the supplied strings settle. It has a few different features to the 2006/7 model I have. Apparently Mahalo sold a million ukes in 2010. They will be getting some age. I have formed a view that you could have a lot of fun setting up a collection of U30s, working out when the headstock shapes changed and the tuners changed etc and tracking down minty examples. I think you might be able to put together a nice representative collection for less than $200, and one or two will have an excellent tone. I was thinking of starting a thread suggesting this as a learning experience for budding ukulele enthusiasts, especially those of school age. I remember reading somewhere that the U30 shape is based on one of the Martins. There are also Ohanas and Kalas etc getting some age which you could start to collect.
Money is not everything, we are lucky to live at a time when playable ukuleles are available over a wide price range, and also lucky that there is a good second hand market avaiable. If you focus on music and not money, you may be humbled by someone elses playing, but you are not likely to be humbled by the price tags on someone elses instruments.

the flat tire
12-17-2015, 08:03 PM
I sell mainly because there's no emotional attachment.
Or for whatever reason, it didn't float my boat.
I sold a KoAloha, but for some reason I can't get rid of a Kala, my first 'good' instrument, even though I hardly play it now.
I think I'm more careful or selective on what I'm purchasing so I start off sort of 'attached' to what I buy and earlier acquisitions mean less to me.

DownUpDave
12-18-2015, 12:02 AM
I have held on to most of mine, the herd is growing so I might sell off a few. I have been playing about 1-1/2 years and it has been a big learning curve as to the sound I like and more importantly the dimesion that work for me. My third uke was a Pete Howlet custom koa tenor I bought used. Lovely instrument but with a slim neck, found out I don't like slim necks. I sold a gorgeous Koaloha KCM-00 because concert size was really not my favorite and a friend absolutely covetted that uke. He is very happy with it and I am glad he has it.

Remember when you sell a uke that is not right for you it might just be the buyers holy grail. Win win :shaka:

Croaky Keith
12-18-2015, 12:38 AM
At the risk of speaking out of turn, and getting the ire of a number of people, this thread has gotten way too expensive for me. If fact in a lot if ways, this forum has gotten to become an exercise in name dropping at a private club.

There are a lot of people who can only afford what they have and are saving to find a better instrument and it has to be disheartening when they read such cavalier comments about discarding excellent instruments like yesterday's garbage.

Sorry for offending people.

John

I think it is interesting how much some people will pay for something that may play a little bit better than the run of the mill ukes.

Maybe we should start a thread for cheap uke players. :music:

DownUpDave
12-18-2015, 02:30 AM
I think it is interesting how much some people will pay for something that may play a little bit better than the run of the mill ukes.

Maybe we should start a thread for cheap uke players. :music:


Do a search.......that has already been done.......a number of times. All ukes are good ukes as long as you like them no matter their cost.

kkimura
12-18-2015, 03:24 AM
I saw a great ukulele ad a while a go. The seller presented the situation as sadly dysfunctional personal relationship where interest in the uke on sale was displaced by a new acquaintance. A classic "break up" story.

hollisdwyer
12-18-2015, 04:11 AM
I wonder if we tend to hang onto the instruments that we have commissioned more than the customs we have purchased 2nd hand? Having more 'skin in the game' with the ones commissioned might make them more of a keeper.

Inksplosive AL
12-18-2015, 08:47 AM
I have personal issues buying things but never selling anything. My currently neglected ukuleles are simply in standby for the day that feeling comes over me to grab something different.

:)

rappsy
12-18-2015, 08:57 AM
If you are talking to me, yes, I do have a very understanding wife but everything has its limits. I'll be retiring next year and we will probably move to an apartment so 'downsizing' is the word of the year for us from now on.

Say it ain't so, Hollis. AHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH!!!!!

janeray1940
12-18-2015, 09:15 AM
I see a lot of really nice ukes for sale in the marketplace forum. It made me wonder why they no longer held that special place in the owner's heart?

I own a Collings that I really like and wouldn't think of parting with it. I also must note that it is the only ukulele I own.

I'm just courious what made these special ukes not so special.-Ray

I've sold a DaSilva custom, and a Kamaka Ohta-San, both of which I suppose some would consider "special." I'm not really sentimental about this sort of thing, and I live in a really tiny space, so I'm pretty minimalist when it comes to possessions. I sold the custom because what I *thought* I wanted turned out to not be what I wanted at all, and I sold the Ohta-San because my little hands could never get comfortable with the larger scale (I play soprano and concert, and the Ohta-San is closer to tenor scale).

In each case I took a good long time before committing to selling - by the time I posted them here, I hadn't played them in months. I've sort of got a three-month rule with just about everything I own: unless it's something seasonal like a winter coat, if it hasn't been used it three months, I'm pretty sure I don't need it. In the case of the ukes, it was more like 6 months.

All of that to say - no regrets, and I hope each uke *did* turn out to be "special" for someone! I've kept the three ukes that are "special" to me.

janeray1940
12-18-2015, 09:19 AM
I wonder if we tend to hang onto the instruments that we have commissioned more than the customs we have purchased 2nd hand? Having more 'skin in the game' with the ones commissioned might make them more of a keeper.

I think I did to some extent - usually I'm pretty sure after a couple months if I want to re-home a uke, but it took me two years to commit to re-homing the custom I had commissioned. Turned out everything I thought I wanted really wasn't what I wanted at all, but it took me some time to figure that out and come to terms with it! Live and learn.

hollisdwyer
12-18-2015, 06:24 PM
Say it ain't so, Hollis. AHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH!!!!!

You know Lenny, I am comfortable with a smaller collection. That doesn't mean that I don't want to play some nice looking Ukes I see for sale on UU or FMM or in the NUD posts (God, doesn't Cam's new Kinnard look fantastic), but I don't feel I have to own one (except for that Kinnard). Lol.

SteveZ
12-19-2015, 02:20 AM
Ukulele isn't an instrument - it's a family of instruments. There are so many sizes, body types, string configurations, etc. that experimenting with as many as possible to find what one likes the best should not be surprising. The experimentation can result in a physical storage (as well as instrument usage) problem, so some must go when others are added.

Selecting the "to go" instruments is as easy as seeing which cases have dust and which don't.

JustinJ
12-19-2015, 09:33 AM
With my current uke, I liked it from the beginning but was not love at first play. I thought this is workable I thought about trading it or selling it for several months. Just recently, I've made the decision that this is the uke for me. I'm satisfied and it's like my wife, here to stay. I love how it plays, how the neck feels and the responsiveness of it.

The responsiveness of it forced me to change my technique. I was brushing a string ever so slightly and it was sounding. The errors seemed to be more glaring than with other ukes that I played. Once I changed my technique I realized that the uke could give me a lot of dynamics.

I think it's wise before selling or trading a uke to play it for several months and put a 100 hours of playing on it. Learn its idiosyncrasies and really understand how to get the best out of it. Only play it for several months,not your other ukes. You bought it because you liked something about it, now dive in and get the most out of it.

If you just pick up an instrument and can not stand it, then of course sell it or trade it. But if you're not too sure, devote a good amount of time to playing it. ,

It takes a while before you can make a judgement on an instrument, at least for me. I'm glad that I did not trade or sell it.

flailingfingers
12-19-2015, 12:57 PM
I seem to have personal issues that take the form of selling anything I don't use. It particularly hurts me to see an old favorite sitting around unplayed. It deserves better so I sell it to someone who will, hopefully, take better care of it ,which means: really PLAY it.

Bill1
12-19-2015, 02:42 PM
I don't have a lot of sentimentality. When I was working a well payed job i planned for the future and picked up some great Ukuleles. When you stop paid work everything is expensive, no matter how big your pension is. Now I still have all the ukes. If I don't play them for a year or two years it does not matter, I will live much longer than that and will get back to the ukes. Storage and security are an issue, but not an insurmountable issue.
Uke makers retire and stop making. Tree farms experience different seasons and develop different wood. The world is changing. Unless you really need the money, or space, check out what Justin wrote and put in a good 100 hours before you decide to sell.

Dan Uke
12-19-2015, 03:48 PM
I see a lot of really nice ukes for sale in the marketplace forum. It made me wonder why they no longer held that special place in the owner's heart?

I own a Collings that I really like and wouldn't think of parting with it. I also must note that it is the only ukulele I own.

I'm just courious what made these special ukes not so special.-Ray

I am not too sentimental with items in general so if the uke doesn't have the sound I like, I sell it. Of course, there are exceptions like the Kamaka, which represents my first uke and has the date stamp of Mar 2011, about the time I started.

I'm glad you like your Collings. I've owned two but not for me.

Ukejenny
12-19-2015, 03:59 PM
So far, I haven't sold any of my ukes. I've really enjoyed each one and they all have a place and a use for me, musically and personally.

KaraUkey
12-21-2015, 02:57 PM
I sold a "loaner" uke once because a really nice lady took a real shine to it. Other than that I have kept all my ukes. Funny how you can pick one up out of the blue, play it and think wow what a great little uke. To me they all have their own sound and feel. It's part of what I like about ukes.

mountain goat
12-21-2015, 03:13 PM
The same person that made me buy it.

The devil.

Nickie
12-21-2015, 04:08 PM
I sold an Oscar Schmidt tenor because I didn't like the sound, and it was heavy.
I sold an Ohana soprano because it was too "clinky" sounding.
I sold a Luna concert because the pickup control/battery was in an uncomfortable spot.

I hope that was straightforward enough and I didn't insult anyone.

Ukejenny
12-22-2015, 09:01 AM
I sold an Oscar Schmidt tenor because I didn't like the sound, and it was heavy.
I sold an Ohana soprano because it was too "clinky" sounding.
I sold a Luna concert because the pickup control/battery was in an uncomfortable spot.

I hope that was straightforward enough and I didn't insult anyone.

I am completely insulted by your lack of emotion. (I kid, I kid!!!!)

Nickie
12-23-2015, 07:14 AM
I am completely insulted by your lack of emotion. (I kid, I kid!!!!)

Thanks for the laugh.
I was hoping to get a rise out of someone!

sam13
12-23-2015, 09:29 AM
I needed more underwear.

kvehe
12-23-2015, 10:52 AM
I haven't sold one yet. It would mess up my numbering system. (What if I sold my second uke? Would my third become #2? You see my issue. :))

Dan Uke
12-24-2015, 03:00 AM
I haven't sold one yet. It would mess up my numbering system. (What if I sold my second uke? Would my third become #2? You see my issue. :))

that's pretty funny :D

sculptor
12-24-2015, 10:09 AM
First, I have two Collings and believe that some of them are among the best values out there.

Directly to your question, I went through a period where I wanted to experience many different ukes on one hand, and on the other, agreed (at that time) with my wife since I was consulting (not working regularly) that I would limit my ukes to two (then). So, I rotated through ukes very quickly to experience many. I absolutely regret some of those that I sold, but I love the variety and learning from this experience. I've owned over three dozen ukes in my 2.33 years of "ukiness".

I am now gainfully employed and own, uh, more than two. With another Kinnard and a Beau Hannam in process.

Sounds like there is a real need for a Ukeoholics Ananomous! :)

-- Gary

sculptor
12-24-2015, 10:23 AM
At the risk of speaking out of turn, and getting the ire of a number of people, this thread has gotten way too expensive for me. If fact in a lot if ways, this forum has gotten to become an exercise in name dropping at a private club.

There are a lot of people who can only afford what they have and are saving to find a better instrument and it has to be disheartening when they read such cavalier comments about discarding excellent instruments like yesterday's garbage.

Sorry for offending people.

John
John --

Note, I got serious hate postings when I expressed something similar. This particular forum seems to be the worst with regard to what you mention.

Note, to cut your spending try to justify purchases in a more rational manner by asking yourself some questions like:

Will this instrument offer me something meaningful that my currents instruments can't? For instance, you like a particular electric uke but there isn't a chance in hell you'll ever need to plug it in for a gig or even a private kitchen concert... so don't buy it because though it offers something, it's not meaningful.

Is this the cheapest option that works or is this about the bling? You can get pro quality instruments starting in the $300 range... so why spend ten times as much?

-- Gary

Bill1
12-24-2015, 12:13 PM
I think the whole point of the OP is to find out why someone spends what seems to be a lot of money on a musical instrument, and then when they get it and find out what it is like, they just up and resell it.
The thread is about instruments which seem expensive, its rare to find someone who wonders why you gave away your $50 Kala suddenly.
I think a major reason for most resales is about money. A good buying strategy is to always try to buy something that is easy to sell and get say 80%+ of the purchase price back. People buy a Collings knowing it is going to be easy to resell for a good price. So they buy it for say $2000, sell it for $1800 and play it for a few months in between. The experience costs $200 for a few months of learning and musical enjoyment. Some one day music festivals sell $200 tickets. If they tried to save money and picked up a $250 Kala and then could not sell it and had to give it away to get rid of it, the experience costs $250. Maybe it can be hard to accumulate the initial outlay, but often buying a musical instrument with the right extras and bling is going to be a lot more cost effective if you are turning over instruments in a learning phase, when compared with buying a string of low cost instruments which are hard to even give away.
A second consideration with low cost ukes, if you really care about poor people, is the treatment of the workers who make the instruments and the ecological impact of the construction materials. Out of Collings and Kala, which company is most likely to have good working conditions and which company is more likely to use sustainable construction materials?
Helping poor people is not about silly emotional blackmail or fake economies, if you want to help them get yourself into one of the many charity organisations and help them, making silly distracting comments on a ukulele bulletin board is never going to help them much.

flailingfingers
12-24-2015, 01:20 PM
I think the whole point of the OP is to find out why someone spends what seems to be a lot of money on a musical instrument, and then when they get it and find out what it is like, they just up and resell it.
The thread is about instruments which seem expensive, its rare to find someone who wonders why you gave away your $50 Kala suddenly.
I think a major reason for most resales is about money. A good buying strategy is to always try to buy something that is easy to sell and get say 80%+ of the purchase price back. People buy a Collings knowing it is going to be easy to resell for a good price. So they buy it for say $2000, sell it for $1800 and play it for a few months in between. The experience costs $200 for a few months of learning and musical enjoyment. Some one day music festivals sell $200 tickets. If they tried to save money and picked up a $250 Kala and then could not sell it and had to give it away to get rid of it, the experience costs $250. Maybe it can be hard to accumulate the initial outlay, but often buying a musical instrument with the right extras and bling is going to be a lot more cost effective if you are turning over instruments in a learning phase, when compared with buying a string of low cost instruments which are hard to even give away.
A second consideration with low cost ukes, if you really care about poor people, is the treatment of the workers who make the instruments and the ecological impact of the construction materials. Out of Collings and Kala, which company is most likely to have good working conditions and which company is more likely to use sustainable construction materials?
Helping poor people is not about silly emotional blackmail or fake economies, if you want to help them get yourself into one of the many charity organisations and help them, making silly distracting comments on a ukulele bulletin board is never going to help them much.

Really well put. Thanks.
I'm sorry that John and Gary feel they cannot afford expensive ukes. But to be put off by the fact that others can afford the best and enjoy owning them strikes me as a form of reverse elitism. However it's also a matter of priorities. I choose to splurge in this arena since the playing of music offers me so much joy. I don't splurge on expensive cars or fine wine. I have found that, for me, the joy of playing an excellent ukulele is worth every penny. It actually seems to be cheap medicine in fact.

buddhuu
12-24-2015, 02:13 PM
Sorry, this sour grapes about other people's instruments thing is getting old very quickly. I may reopen this after Boxing Day but for now, chill the heck out. Ho ho ho.