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Ukettante
12-20-2015, 09:44 PM
A couple of days ago I was at the airport check-in counter, waiting for my family's boarding passes to our tropical destination. I looked around, and saw this guy pushing a cart with two suitcases plus what appeared to be a tenor ukulele gigbag to the adjacent counter. I thought: Dang I should've brought my soprano!

Then I looked away. Seconds later when I looked back, I saw the guy swinging his suitcases onto the scale and then pointing to his uke gigbag. He seemed unable to speak English at all and was trying to ask whether it was OK to check his ukulele. My eyes bulged, and I was hoping the lady behind the counter would shake her head. But alas, she nodded. Hey, you can check anything you want as long as it's not prohibited by law. Regrettably, I let the moment slip past without saying anything. In the days that followed, I just kept thinking I should've stepped in and stopped the nonsense, language barrier or no language barrier.

UkieOkie
12-21-2015, 03:17 AM
With time your guilt will dissipate mostly but it's likely you'll never fully outrun the shame. ����

kohanmike
12-21-2015, 08:01 AM
A segment on Sunday Morning CBS showed that strangers are very willing to engage in conversation. This incident should prepare you to make contact next time.

Rllink
12-21-2015, 08:16 AM
You shouldn't worry about it. I'm assuming he was an adult, and capable of making his own decisions.

Jim Hanks
12-21-2015, 01:22 PM
With time your guilt will dissipate mostly but it's likely you'll never fully outrun the shame.

Bwahahahaha :biglaugh:


You shouldn't worry about it. I'm assuming he was an adult, and capable of making his own decisions.

But I'm with rllink, not really your place, and certainly not your "problem"

TheCraftedCow
12-22-2015, 08:43 AM
I think these replies advocating neutrality indicates an attitude which causes a significant part of our societal problems. The lack of concern for someone else's problems destroys cohesiveness. Would I want someone to disregard assisting one of my friends or relatives? Absolutely not! A strange language would indicate a person perhaps not familiar with many things we take for granted. How many people watched Kitty Genovese murdered but did not get involved because by habit they were passive and detached . Little things form habits It has been said bad habits are hard to break, but the same also holds true for good habits.

Rllink
12-22-2015, 08:55 AM
I think these replies advocating neutrality indicates an attitude which causes a significant part of our societal problems. The lack of concern for someone else's problems destroys cohesiveness. Would I want someone to disregard assisting one of my friends or relatives? Absolutely not! A strange language would indicate a person perhaps not familiar with many things we take for granted. How many people watched Kitty Genovese murdered but did not get involved because by habit they were passive and detached . Little things form habits It has been said bad habits are hard to break, but the same also holds true for good habits.I think there is a big difference in taking action to save someone from being murdered by someone else, and going up and telling people how they should or shouldn't be transporting their ukulele. I frankly think that people telling other people what they should or shouldn't be doing is causing a lot of our societal problems.

Ukejenny
12-22-2015, 08:58 AM
Try not to beat yourself up too much. The universe will send you another chance to do a good ukulele deed.