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photoshooter
01-05-2016, 03:16 PM
I'm wanting to try some inlay techniques and will likely build my own Dremel base since the StewMac is on the pricey side (I'm just a hobbyist). I was checking out what's new at Lee Valley and they've put out their own flavor of rotary tool plunge base (http://www.leevalley.com/US/wood/page.aspx?p=73720&cat=51&ap=1). Like all of their tools it looks to be well executed. All of a sudden the StewMac base isn't so terribly pricey ;)

87076

Allen
01-05-2016, 09:26 PM
It's actually quite a good price for the machining that's involved in making that complete unit. It really depends on how much you plan on using it as to whether it's justified. If it was me, I think I'd go for it, as I already own the SM one and it's certainly lacking as far as I'm concerned.

RPA_Ukuleles
01-06-2016, 05:01 AM
It does seem that a heavier base could really be an asset for precision work. Less likely to skip around, more stable feeling. Up to a point of course. I made an acrylic one thinking that lighter was better, but now rethinking that.

Huvvers
01-12-2016, 08:27 AM
Hello folks, somewhat late to this thread, but I just got the Veritas plunge base yesterday so I thought I would put my 2cents in. In true Veritas style, this tool is a solid, well built version of the big router setups. Yeh, it's pricey but comes with the accessories to make it versatile and accurate. A big bonus is that the base's threaded holes for attaching the fence rods are on the same hole center s as the SM base. It is possible to use your existing jigs with the Veritas base. First off, I am going to cut some circles with the LV setup, then try my homemade circle cutter. Is it worth it? Now that I have seen it and the second guessing is done, YES!! It definitely satisfied my TAS for awhile. GaryHovde

PS this is my first attempt at posting pics.8729687297

Allen
01-12-2016, 09:00 AM
That's a very good idea there for you to set the depth of your cut based on material. Quick and quite fool proof.

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
01-12-2016, 09:10 AM
That looks very nice and at a pretty reasonable price too. I may have to add one to my collection. For inlay work I use the StewMac base but for rosettes I use a Bishop/Cochran and a Micro Fence. Both very pricey.

Allen
01-12-2016, 04:09 PM
Isn't it funny how those of us that do it for a living think that's its a good price for a bit of quality kit.

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
01-12-2016, 04:25 PM
Isn't it funny how those of us that do it for a living think that's its a good price for a bit of quality kit.

Haha, you're right Allen. These are tools for a life time. I think the Micro-Fence base was well over $300. But it is super precision. The Bishop/Cochran was close in price. I think the Veritas base looks very nice, especially for the price.
Prompted by a thread here recently I just spent $1400 on a couple of Festool sanders and a dust extractor for them. I'm sure I've spent way more than that on all the DeWalts, Makitas, and the Porter cables I've collected over the years. I don't need a lot of tools to do my craft but those tools I do have I want to be the best. Wood (and time) is too valuable these days to take chances. For a hobbyist or occasional builder though they are overkill.

imagean
06-21-2016, 11:17 AM
Hello, I am about to buy one of these Veritas Plunge Base kits and like to know if you are still happy with it.

Many thanks in advance...


Hello folks, somewhat late to this thread, but I just got the Veritas plunge base yesterday so I thought I would put my 2cents in. In true Veritas style, this tool is a solid, well built version of the big router setups. Yeh, it's pricey but comes with the accessories to make it versatile and accurate. A big bonus is that the base's threaded holes for attaching the fence rods are on the same hole center s as the SM base. It is possible to use your existing jigs with the Veritas base. First off, I am going to cut some circles with the LV setup, then try my homemade circle cutter. Is it worth it? Now that I have seen it and the second guessing is done, YES!! It definitely satisfied my TAS for awhile. GaryHovde

PS this is my first attempt at posting pics.8729687297

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
06-21-2016, 11:23 AM
Just so's you know, I never found a plunge base necessary when doing inlay work. Simply tilt the base away from you and dig in. After all you're only plunging 1/16" or less and you're always starting in the field and working your way to the line anyway.

Huvvers
06-26-2016, 08:26 PM
Hello imagean. Sorry for the late reply. Yes I am happy with it. My last job was to cut rabbet on the bottom of my moulds. I loaded the Dremel with a 2 flute,1/4" bit and installed the 6 inches fence rods with the follower attached to the micro adjustable fence. It was a little off balance because all the weight of the rods and fence were hanging out in mid air. Once I got the right grip on the base, the job went well. There was good line of sight to the bit, but I think that the overall cut was too much for the Dremel itself.So I nibbled away a inch then went full depth to finalize the cut. I did the rabbets on 3 forms in about 45 minutes. It would not be possible to use my bigger routers, because they don't have a pin guided follower like the Veritas. I haven't tried rosettes rebate s yet, but will be cutting some practice channels soon.Up to this point, I am happy with it, and can see that it will be a versatile tool.