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plunker
01-07-2016, 02:08 AM
Are sopranos usually tuned to low G
If they are is there a good substitute string for the Low G on a soprano. I have some tenor strings and wondering which one would be best.

My tenor is strung to low g and my great nephew is comming over for us to baby sit. I am going to try to get him hooked. eh, eh, eh.

Croaky Keith
01-07-2016, 02:24 AM
As far as I know, all soprano, concert, & tenor ukes are normally tuned to high G (gCEA), some people like to put a low G string on as it gives some extra lower notes (GCEA).

Edit: You should be able to buy a single low G string if you want to try it out.

jollyboy
01-07-2016, 02:49 AM
As I understand it, soprano is the one size that is pretty much never tuned to low-g. I'm not even sure if soprano scale low-g strings are available.

FarmerBill
01-07-2016, 03:21 AM
I have two sopranos tuned to low-g, one with fremont blacks and one with an aquila red low-g. They work great for me.

La Perdrix
01-07-2016, 03:28 AM
I also love the aquila-red on soprano, the fremont is a little bit to smooth for me...
there is also an aquila wound low-g string, as you can hear it here : https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=MTD8q9AlZ5w

good_uke_boy
01-07-2016, 03:51 AM
Usually tuned low-G? No.
Can be? Yes. I have Fremont soloist low-g strings on two sopranos:
http://www.theukulelesite.com/fremont-soloist-polished-low-g-string.html

Lori
01-07-2016, 06:39 AM
It can be done. You might have to try out a couple of different brands of string to find the best fit for your uke. I think a polished wound string like the Fremont Soloist would be a good place to start.
–Lori

hendulele
01-07-2016, 06:44 AM
It might be possible to use a C string and tune it to G as well, but I'm not sure how that would work on a soprano.

Rakelele
01-07-2016, 07:21 AM
Romero Creations XS is the only Soprano I can think of that comes standard with a low G. They have La Bella strings with a wound low G. I have recently changed that one to the Fremont Soloist low G which is much more resonant.

brimmer
01-07-2016, 09:49 AM
Sure, you can play low g on a soprano. Whether you can play as nice as Ohta-san is another matter entirely.


https://youtu.be/lqwo6yGswOk

brimmer
01-07-2016, 09:52 AM
Another, one of my favorites, Ohta-san's composition Hawaii. If you want to play Hawaii with a high G uke, you have to alter the tune because there are melody notes on the low G string.


https://youtu.be/pMOKhxm9UfY

kypfer
01-07-2016, 11:50 AM
As others have noted, Aquila produce a set of "reds" with a low G for a soprano ukulele.

FWIW, my experience suggests that a conventional "waisted" soprano ukulele has problems with the lower notes when strung "low-G", the volume just isn't there.

However, I do have two different pineapple soprano ukuleles strung with a low G, and both of them respond much better to the lower notes. - (in case you're wondering, one of them is tuned in 5th's)

All of my ukuleles are "economy" laminate models, so it's not a case of good ones and bad ones ;) ... if you do have a "quality" instrument your experiences may differ !!

coolkayaker1
01-07-2016, 03:40 PM
I've discovered low G on my sopranos to always be flabby, given the lower tension nature of sopranos to begin with.

So, I just skip the five extra semitones ("notes") that a low G would give me and play high G, like Jake.

How Ohta-San pulls it off, I haven't a clue. LOL. He sure is good, though, for sure.

TheCraftedCow
01-08-2016, 05:03 AM
The first song to come to mainland USA via radio was a low g song. that was 75 years ago. BOTH tunings are authentic and acceptable. I wonder how many are "pure" enough to still play on gut strings tuned with wooden pegs. If you really want an arresting sound from a soprano, put a low g on both the 1 and 4 string and pull the #1 up to an 'a' . It is a great sound for doin' the blues.

aarondminnick
01-08-2016, 05:51 AM
Here's another option to consider: leave the high G and swap out the A string for low A instead! If you are just chording, it will work fine. Should give an interesting sound.

Inksplosive AL
01-08-2016, 07:46 AM
I have a Risa solid soprano (stick) that I tried using the Aquila red low G with. The design of the ukulele grabs the string at the crossover bar and snaps it between the tuner and this bar. Since I still haven't modded to fit the Aquila red low g and I wanted to start playing with it again I started looking around google to see what else I could use.

My search found talk of using a D string off a classical guitar. I still haven't tried it but read about those who have. It also isn't too hard to find the diameter on a currently sold low g for ukulele for comparison.

Since I mentioned Aquila reds and string breakage I have a bit more to say. First I would like to mention that I am not paid to say this and I have never ever been offered anything free, discounted, or offered a replacement by anyone who makes these.

I love the red strings the papery feel the thinness compared to other strings and the sound. The day or so the low g was working on my stick I was having much fun making breathing sounds come from my amp while playing. After the 2nd low g broke on me I pulled out the reentrant G and strung it up. I have had zero string breakage on the Risa and now three other sopranos I have reentrant sets on. Two sets are over a year old and still going strong.

http://forum.ukuleleunderground.com/showthread.php?49868-What-string-for-Low-G

Funny seems the low g on a soprano argument has been going on here for awhile now.

WhenDogsSing
01-08-2016, 09:07 AM
I use D'Addario Pro Arte J4304 (.028") classical guitar strings (D string) for low G on my Kiwaya KTS-7 soprano. Works good for me.

TheCraftedCow
01-10-2016, 06:46 AM
Is the string pinching at the slot in the nut or the slot in the saddle? I have widened them on the ukuleles I have with low g on them, and on soprano -concert - tenor, I have yet to break a string. The same goes for the soprano and concert banjo ukuleles. A couple of them are strung through the body rather than knotted at the bridge.

whistleman123
01-10-2016, 08:06 AM
Here's another option to consider: leave the high G and swap out the A string for low A instead! If you are just chording, it will work fine. Should give an interesting sound.

I'd like to try this! Would you just use another low G string and tune it up a major 2end? Or would a different a different string choice work better?

Mim
01-10-2016, 08:35 AM
Normally it is High G, but a low G is not a problem. If you are not sure if you are completely sold on the Low G and just want to try it out, I suggest the Aquila Wound Single Low G string. You dont have to widen the nut slot and can go back and forth between High and Low G and give it a try that way.

JackLuis
01-10-2016, 01:07 PM
Phd make a low G set for Soprano and Concerts. I tried them on a spruce topped Ohana concert but removed them to try Fremont black lines. I just got a soprano Caramel and the Aq Super Nyguts that came on it aren't my cup of Mocha. I will put the Phds on it to see if that removes the plunkyness.

I've been playing tenor and concerts and haven't been a fan of soprano's.

Anyone else notice that strings change character after they settle a bit? I noticed that for a few days they flatten and need to be touched up, but after they settle down they change character just a bit. It seems like it takes a week before they give you a true sound?