PDA

View Full Version : Thoughts on Colings UT1-K



Txmiller
01-27-2016, 04:05 PM
I was all set to order a Pono ProClassic but discovered this Collings that's available in my backyard. I'm very familiar with Collings guitars quality etc, but am just beginning my Uke adventure so I don't know anything about their Uke line. What's the verdict on their UT1-K? Do they have a radioused fret board and a adj. truss rod in the neck? How important are these since string tension is a lot lower than on a guitar? How does their Koa rate against their Mahogany ukes? Thanks

Ukulele Eddie
01-27-2016, 04:19 PM
I'm a fan of their ukes (see signature). I love their neck profile. Fit and finish are invariably perfect. Tone generally ranges from good to great. I've only played one Collings that I thought, "meh." Most are "nice" or "Wow." YMMV.

E

UkerDanno
01-27-2016, 04:25 PM
It's a no-brainer, if you can afford it, get the Collings...

hollisdwyer
01-27-2016, 08:05 PM
The Pono Pro Classic's are nice instruments but the Collings, even the no frills UT1 version (frills don't make it sound any better anyway), are superb instruments.

It has always been my opinion that a fine instrument will help you progress because it usually is: easier to play (important when you are a newbie), sound better and therefore gives you more enjoyment and will have a longer 'shelf life' in your home as it will be hard to out grow.

WhenDogsSing
01-28-2016, 01:14 AM
I was all set to order a Pono ProClassic but discovered this Collings that's available in my backyard. I'm very familiar with Collings guitars quality etc, but am just beginning my Uke adventure so I don't know anything about their Uke line. What's the verdict on their UT1-K? Do they have a radioused fret board and a adj. truss rod in the neck? How important are these since string tension is a lot lower than on a guitar? How does their Koa rate against their Mahogany ukes? Thanks

Collings ukuleles have radiused necks but do not have adjustable truss rods in the neck. They are superb instruments.

greenie44
01-28-2016, 01:17 AM
About two years ago I decided that my sincere dedication to playing the uke allowed me to consider getting a more expensive model. I went to a store with a lot of high end ukes (Gryphon Music in the Bay area) and put a whole bunch through their paces. The Collings really stood out and, to make a long story short, I ended up getting a used UT2-K. I have never looked back.

It is a fabulous uke. It shares playing time now with a Kinnard mahogany, which is also terrific, but I still love the Collings.

When I was comparison shopping, I tried a UT1-K and a UT3-K and found that the UT3-K seemed much better. I called Collings and talked to them about it, and they said that the UTK-2 and UTK-3 were different from the UTK-1, with the only difference between the 2 and 3 being bling. You might want to consider going up to the 2.

DownUpDave
01-28-2016, 01:23 AM
I own a Pono Pro Classic and a Collings UT2 so I will try to answer some of your questions and give some personal opinions.

The Collings does have a radius fretboard but does not have a truss rod. Radius is nice if you prefer it truss seems like a good idea but in reality never gets touched. The Collings I own is mahogany and I have played some koa tenor models. Koa is a bit brighter both are somewhat similar in so far as they have that Collings sound, resonant and crisp.

Pono is larger and heavier with a deeper neck. Collings is very light and the smallest sized tenor I have seen.

If you can get a UTK1 at a good price and you like the look and sound I would jump at the deal. Ponos are very common Collings not so much

hollisdwyer
01-28-2016, 04:07 AM
.....When I was comparison shopping, I tried a UT1-K and a UT3-K and found that the UT3-K seemed much better. I called Collings and talked to them about it, and they said that the UTK-2 and UTK-3 were different from the UTK-1, with the only difference between the 2 and 3 being bling.......

As a very new and very happy owner of a Collings UCM-2 I am very interested in hearing how Collings described the difference between the UT1 and the UT2 & UT3 models. Some things are obvious but I was wondering if they mentioned differences in construction methods.

Txmiller
01-28-2016, 07:40 AM
Thanks for the insight. I just spoke w/ Collings regarding model differences. They said the internal builds are identical. External differences are: 1) binding on 2s & 3s 2) grade of wood and 3) finish. 1s are satin and 2s & 3s are gloss. I seem to remember some comments on the Pono site saying that finish did make a difference in sound, volume etc. I wonder if that's some of the difference some people are hearing. I wouldn't think it would make enough change to influence buying decision, or am I wrong?

CdnSouthpaw
01-28-2016, 10:06 AM
Even though it's still a pricey uke, the 1 and the 1k are terrific values.

brimmer
01-28-2016, 11:20 AM
I had a UT1-K and sold it because I don't play tenors any more. They are fine ukes with tremendous build quality. The Collings signature is a very assertive and "forward" sound - their guitars have this tonal property too. "Punchy" might be a good descriptor. Not a mellow Kamaka type of sound, and a much fuller or fatter tone than a Martin. But these are all just adjectives... You should play it and decide if its a sound you like. Many discriminating players love the Collings sound profile, its a matter of preference. They are great ukes, but their distinctive sound profile has to suit your personal taste. I'm a Collings fan, and one of their mahogany concert ukes lurks in my future.

Others may disagree with the adjectives I used. Let your ears be your guide.

greenie44
01-28-2016, 11:41 AM
I had a UT1-K and sold it because I don't play tenors any more. They are fine ukes with tremendous build quality. The Collings signature is a very assertive and "forward" sound - their guitars have this tonal property too. "Punchy" might be a good descriptor. Not a mellow Kamaka type of sound, and a much fuller or fatter tone than a Martin. But these are all just adjectives... You should play it and decide if its a sound you like. Many discriminating players love the Collings sound profile, its a matter of preference. They are great ukes, but their distinctive sound profile has to suit your personal taste. I'm a Collings fan, and one of their mahogany concert ukes lurks in my future.

Others may disagree with the adjectives I used. Let your ears be your guide.

I don't disagree. It's why I can justify my Collings and my Kinnard. Although both are fantastic instruments, they sound and play quite differently.

Personally, I find the Collings more responsive to playing technique, which can be a hindrance for someone with limited playing skills like myself. But it encourages me to play with a more delicate approach, which is better for now and in the future.

Ukulele Eddie
01-28-2016, 05:33 PM
As a very new and very happy owner of a Collings UCM-2 I am very interested in hearing how Collings described the difference between the UT1 and the UT2 & UT3 models. Some things are obvious but I was wondering if they mentioned differences in construction methods.

At some point, I somewhere read that there was a difference from "1" models and the "2's and 3's". I contributed to that by restating it here on UU. I later learned from Collings directly that there are ZERO differences in the acoustic build attributes of any Collings ukes. So I feel compelled when I see the misinformation repeated, to correct it (like atoning for my prior sin! ;-).

hollisdwyer
01-28-2016, 06:48 PM
At some point, I somewhere read that there was a difference from "1" models and the "2's and 3's". I contributed to that by restating it here on UU. I later learned from Collings directly that there are ZERO differences in the acoustic build attributes of any Collings ukes. So I feel compelled when I see the misinformation repeated, to correct it (like atoning for my prior sin! ;-).

Thanks for that Eddie. It was what I was expecting as I know that Beau Hannam's Players Model has the same attention as to what it will sound like as his higher priced models. I believe I read that Chuck Moore does the same. A simpler finish/construction (lower graded wood sets, no bindings, no inlays, stock tuners, etc) allows the maker to sell at a lower price point. So a Collings is a Collings, A Beau Hannam is a Beau Hannam and a Chuck Moore is a Chuck Moore. Some are not fancy but they all sound and play wonderfully.

DownUpDave
01-29-2016, 12:40 AM
Thanks for that Eddie. It was what I was expecting as I know that Beau Hannam's Players Model has the same attention as to what it will sound like as his higher priced models. I believe I read that Chuck Moore does the same. A simpler finish/construction (lower graded wood sets, no bindings, no inlays, stock tuners, etc) allows the maker to sell at a lower price point. So a Collings is a Collings, A Beau Hannam is a Beau Hannam and a Chuck Moore is a Chuck Moore. Some are not fancy but they all sound and play wonderfully.


If I am not mistaken one of Coreys personal insruments was a UT1 and he can pick from a large sampling of Collings. High gloss finish and fancy bling does not equate to better sound.

blowery
01-29-2016, 05:23 AM
I have a UT-1, a KoAloha Pikake Concert and a few other cheapies.

The fit and finish on the Collings is superb. The case is great. A very articulate uke that is just fantastic for finger style. Extremely light and responsive with high sustain. Very easy to play and great neck feel/profile. Thats not the first time at all I've heard that the base model UT-1s are some of the best sounding ones. YMMV.

Oh and the smell of the collings is awesome!

Txmiller
01-31-2016, 11:52 AM
For you guys with Collings UT1s, does it fit OK in the hard case with an end pin or pickup jack? Thanks

bearbike137
02-01-2016, 07:47 AM
I love Collings instruments (I own both an acoustic and electric guitar made by them), but their tenor ukulele having only thirteen frets to the body is a deal breaker for me. I strongly prefer 14 frets (like Kamaka, and well, just about everyone else out there). I need the additional room on the upper fretboard.

Is it just me, or have they modified their bridge from the earlier models? If I recall, the back of the bridge used to taper all they way down to the ukulele's top. I actually had a string pull out of there and take some of the wood with it. I had to send it to Collings for repair. They claimed user error on my part, but frankly, it always struck me as an accident waiting to happen. The current bridge looks much more substantial.

gregc
02-03-2016, 03:59 PM
I love my mahogany Collings UT1. Great ukes.